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Health News Results - 287

40-Year Study Finds Weight-Loss Surgery Extending Life Spans

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2023 (HealthDay News) – It’s well known that obesity fuels an increase in a person’s risk for other chronic health conditions.

Now, a new study shows that weight-loss surgery could set that person’s health, and longevity, on a different path.

Utah researchers who followed patients for up to 40 years...

'Spare Tire' in Middle Age Could Mean a Frail Old Age

Any 'middle-age spread' of excess weight around your tummy could raise your risk of becoming frail decades later, a new study suggests.

Obese folks who've packed on pounds around their waist are more likely to develop symptoms of frailty, including exhaustion, weak grip strength, slow walking speed and reduced physical activity levels, researchers say.

Those symptoms can make a per...

Your Weight Could Alter Vitamin D's Effect on Health

Vitamin D is widely promoted for better health, but if you're overweight, you might not reap the benefits.

In a new study, researchers found a 30% to 40% reduction in cancer, cancer deaths and autoimmune diseases among people with a lower body mass index (BMI) who took vitamin D supplements,...

Elementary School Kids Get Healthier When Gardening Is on Curriculum

A Texas-based education initiative has found that enrolling children in poor communities in gardening and cooking classes may help boost their long-term health.

Called “Texas Sprouts," the program covered one full academic year and exposed elementary school children in 16 low-income schools access to outdoor gardening instruction, nutrition information and cooking lessons. Parents were ...

Fast Food May Be Toxic to Your Liver

Do your liver a favor and steer clear of fast food, new research urges.

People with obesity or diabetes who consumed 20% or more of their daily calories from fast food had severely elevated levels of fat in their liver compared to those who ate less fast food or none.

Even the general U.S. population had moderate increases in liver fat when fast food made up one-fifth or more of the...

Leading Pediatricians' Group Calls for More Aggressive Treatment of Childhood Obesity

A leading pediatricians' group has issued new guidelines on treating obesity in children and teens that, for the first time, call for early, aggressive intervention that can include weight-loss drugs and surgery.

“There is no evidence that ‘watchful waiting’ or delayed treatment is appropriate for children with obesity,” Dr.

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 9, 2023
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  • Could Weight-Loss Surgery in Teens Raise Risks for Alcohol Abuse?

    For teens who are obese, weight-loss surgery can be life-changing — but not always in a good way.

    A new study finds a troubling downside to weight-loss surgery among 13- to 19-year-olds: They're at increased risk of alcohol use disorders. And their risk stays higher for up to eight years after their surgery.

    “We have to be honest about both the risks and benefits of these proced...

    Some People's Guts Are Better at Gaining Energy From Food

    If you've ever thought you must absorb more calories from food than other people do, you might be onto something: A new study hints that some people's gut bacteria extract more energy, as in calories, from food — possibly contributing to weight gain.

    The study, of 85 overweight adults, found that those with a particular gut bacteria profile — dubbed the "B-type" — had less energy de...

    U.S. Could Face Surging Numbers of Teens With Diabetes

    The United States could see a huge rise in diabetes among young people over the next several decades, a new modeling study finds.

    As many as 220,000 young people under the age of 20 could have type 2 diabetes in 2060, which would represent a nearly eight-fold increase, a research team that included scientists from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. Type 1 diabetes ...

    Obesity Might Lower Milk Production in Breastfeeding Moms

    While 8 of 10 mothers breastfeed their newborns for a short time, the number plummets despite recommendations from experts, in part because milk production falls off.

    Researchers investigating why that happens found that in women who are obese, inflammation may be the culprit.

    Prior research has shown that when a person is obese, chronic inflammation starts in the fat and spreads to...

    1 in 4 Kids With Type 2 Diabetes Isn't Obese

    It's easy to blame the childhood obesity epidemic for growing cases of type 2 diabetes, but a new study finds nearly one-quarter of all diagnoses are not related to obesity.

    “The finding was somewhat surprising,” said Dr. Constantine Samaan, an associate professor in the department of pediatri...

    Bribing Folks Can Help Them Meet Weight-Loss Goals, Study Finds

    Money may not buy happiness, but it might give low-income obese people an extra incentive to lose weight, a new study suggests.

    The study, of people from urban neighborhoods, found that cash rewards encouraged participants to shed some extra pounds, versus a weight-loss program with no financial bonuses.

    And the effects were similar whether people were rewarded for reaching the...

    As Kids' Obesity Rises, Brain Health Declines: Study

    Kids who are overweight or obese often struggle with school work, and now new research provides clues on how excess weight may harm the developing brain.

    “The main takeaway is to raise awareness about brain health consequences of obesity besides physical health consequences, especially since obesity rates are very high and continue to rise,” said study author

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 29, 2022
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  • Words Can Wound When Parents Talk to Kids About Obesity

    With U.S. health officials calling childhood obesity a public health crisis, conversations about weight are important. But what you say to your kids can be challenging, and even counterproductive, a new study found.

    "Body weight is a sensitive issue and the way we talk about it matters," said lead author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 21, 2022
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  • Exercise Can Help Fight Colon Cancer, Even If Patient Is Obese

    Getting regularly scheduled, moderate physical activity can help extend the lives of people with colon cancer, according to a new study.

    Exercise is even helpful for obese cancer patients, reducing inflammation and improving the bacterial communities of the gut's microbiome, the findings showed.

    "Inflammation is a key process that drives colorectal cancer. We know a high BMI [body m...

    Weight-Loss Surgery Slashes Odds for Heart Attack in Very Obese People

    Getting bariatric surgery may significantly help prevent heart attacks, strokes and angina in very obese people, a new study finds. The study participants were also affected by what's known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is often linked with obesity.

    While studying patients who had a body mass index (BMI) higher than 40 and NAFLD, researchers from Rutgers Universi...

    More Teens Are Getting Weight Loss Surgery, If Families Can Afford It

    A growing number of U.S. teenagers are undergoing weight-loss surgery, but the figures suggest many still lack access to the procedures -- especially underinsured Black and Hispanic kids.

    That's the conclusion of a new study charting trends in bariatric (weight-loss) surgery among U.S. teens. Researchers found that between 2010 and 2017, the annual rate of the procedures doubled among kid...

    Obesity Could Speed Disability When MS Strikes

    Obesity is never healthy, and that may be especially true for people who also develop multiple sclerosis.

    Obese people with MS are likely to see the disability linked to the disease rapidly worsen, said German researchers who followed more than 1,000 patients in a new study.

    Weight loss, they suggested, might help slow the progression of the disease.

    "The findings from this s...

    Sleep-Deprived Kids Will Snack More: Study

    Experts studying kids' sleep and eating habits have learned more about a potential reason for childhood obesity.

    Kids who are deprived of sleep tend to eat more calories the next day, researchers found. And some of those extra calories come from less-healthy, sugar-laden snacks or treats.

    "When children lost sleep, overall they ate an extra 74 calories per day, caused by an increase...

    Good Sleep Could Keep Illness at Bay as You Age

    As men and women enter their golden years, those who regularly fail to get a good night's sleep face a higher risk for developing not one but two serious chronic illnesses at the same time, new research shows.

    Researchers from France, Finland and United Kingdom tracked the self-reported sleep routines and health status of nearly 8,000 Britons from ages 50 to 70.

    While the new analys...

    Years of Diabetes Could Speed Onset of Menopause

    The earlier a woman is diagnosed with diabetes, the sooner she may enter menopause, new research shows.

    Rates of diabetes have grown steadily, so researchers wanted to understand the long-term implications of

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 12, 2022
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  • Late-Night Meals Especially Bad for Weight Gain: Study

    Your fondness for midnight snacks has caused you to pack on the pounds over the years, and now researchers have a better understanding of why.

    While late-night eating has long been linked with an increased risk for obesity, researchers weren't sure exactly how it caused weight gain until now.

    "When meals are delayed by four hours and everything else stays the same, you burn fewer ca...

    Firefighters Show Fasting Diets Can Work for Shift Workers

    "Time-restricted" eating is a popular way to lose weight, and a new study suggests it can offer shift-workers a way to eat more healthfully.

    Time-restricted eating is a form of intermittent fasting, where people limit themselves to eating within...

    Healthy Living Boosts Life Span, Even for Former Smokers

    Eating well and exercising can make for a longer life, and that holds true for former smokers, too, a new study shows.

    Researchers found that of nearly 160,000 former smokers, those who exercised, ate healthfully and limited their drinking were less likely to die over the next couple of decades, versus their counterparts with less-healthy habits.

    It's well known that when smokers ki...

    Knee Trouble? Losing Weight May Help Slow Arthritis

    Losing excess weight may not only help prevent knee arthritis, but also slow its progression in people who already have the condition, a recent study suggests.

    Researchers found that among over 9,000 middle-aged and older adults, those who managed to shed some extra weight benefited their knees in two ways...

    Not Just Obesity: Everyone May Have a 'Fat Threshold' for Type 2 Diabetes

    If you are one of the millions of people with type 2 diabetes, losing weight can help reverse the blood sugar disease even if you aren't overweight or obese, new research reveals.

    Here's the proof: 70% of people with type 2 diabetes who were a normal weight during the study went into remission after they lost roughly 10% o...

    Diets Haven't Improved Much Worldwide, and U.S. Remains Near Bottom of List

    Despite everything people have learned about good nutrition, folks around the world aren't eating much healthier than they were three decades ago, a new global review has concluded.

    Diets are still closer to a poor score of zero -- with loads of sugar and processed meats -- than they are to a score of 100 representing lots of fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and whole grains, Tufts Unive...

    Weight-Loss Surgery Has Long-Term Benefits for Pain, Mobility

    Bariatric surgery aims to help severely obese patients shed significant weight, and now new research shows that many can also look forward to lasting pain relief and mobility.

    Though many patients regain some weight in the first couple of years after bariatric surgery, pain and m...

    Sugary Drinks Could Raise Your Odds for Fatal Cancers: Study

    New research offers yet another reason why Americans should cut back on their soda consumption: Drinking too many sugary beverages may increase the risk of death from cancer.

    "Unfortunately, Americans exceed recommended limits on sugar consumption by ...

    Cancers in People Under 50 Are Rising Worldwide

    Cancers among younger adults are a growing global problem and are likely related to factors like poor diet, obesity and inactivity, a new research review finds.

    Since the 1990s, researchers say, rates of various cancers have been rising in many countries among people under 50. And while the reasons are not fully clear, it's likely that changes in lifestyle and environment — starting ear...

    Pregnancy Undermines Body Image in Half of Women

    Many women are unhappy with how their bodies look both during and after pregnancy, and it's an issue that can trigger postpartum depression and eating disorders, a new study suggests.

    Researchers from...

    Talking to Your Child About Weight, But Avoiding Stigma

    Helping a child deal with a weight issue, while avoiding negativity about their body image, can be challenging, one expert says.

    Yet, obesity affects 20% of American children, causing harm to physical and mental health.

    Dr. Marsha Novick, medical director of the Healthy Weight Program for Children and Tee...

    Are Big Breakfasts Really the Key to Weight Loss?

    Dieters who believe that eating a big breakfast followed by a small dinner is the surest way to lose weight will likely be very disappointed by the findings of a new, small study.

    What did the researchers discover? Eating the largest meal early in the day is unlikely to make any difference.

    “The notion of timing of eating to influence health has been around for a long time,” sai...

    Do Taxes on Soda Really Lower Sugar Intake?

    New research suggests that good intentions may not always be enough when it comes to public health.

    According to the study of the consequences of Philadelphia's 2017 tax on sugar-sweete...

    Hypertension in Pregnancy Is Getting More Common for Gen Z Women

    Gen Zers and millennials are about twice as likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy than women from the baby boom generation were, a new study finds. This includes conditions such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension.

    It's usually believed that the odds of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy rise with the age of the mother, but after taking age into acco...

    Too Little Sleep Could Have Teens Piling on Pounds

    New research suggests that not getting enough sleep may doom adolescents and teens to obesity and poorer health as they enter adulthood.

    Those who slept less than eight hours a night were more likely to be overweight or obese than their peers who do get...

    Are You Among the 'Diet-Resistant'? Workouts May Be Key to Weight Loss

    "You can't run from the fork."

    It's an old weight-loss saying, reminding folks that diet is more important than exercise when it comes to shedding excess pounds.

    But is that true for everyone?

    New research suggests there's a category of "diet-resistant" people who need to work out and watch what they eat if they want to shed pounds.

    In fact, these folks should ...

    8/8 -- Self-Employed Women Are Often Healthier: Study

    Women who are their own bosses might have healthier hearts to show for it, a new study suggests.

    The study, of more than 4,600 working U.S. women, found that those who were self-employed typically got more exercise and were less likely to be obese or have

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • More Than Half of Young U.S. Adults Have a Chronic Health Condition

    Obesity, depression, high blood pressure, asthma: These are just a few of the chronic health conditions that are now affecting almost 40 million Americans between the ages 18 and 34, new federal data shows.

    Overall, the 2019 data found that more than half of young adults (nearly 54%) now deal with at least on...

    More Young Americans Are Dying of Heart Failure

    A growing number of younger American adults are dying of heart failure, with Black Americans being the hardest-hit, a new study finds.

    Heart failure is a chronic condition in which the heart muscle cannot pump blood as well as it should, leading to symptoms like fat...

    PFAS 'Forever Chemicals' Cost the U.S. Billions

    They are called "forever chemicals" because they linger in the human body and can contribute to the risk of everything from cancer to childhood obesity.

    Now, new research on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) finds they also exact a huge financial toll, costing the U.S. health system billions every year.

    ...

    Fat Around the Liver Raises Risk for Heart Failure

    About 30% of adults around the world have a buildup of fat in the liver, a condition called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Now an international team of researchers has linked that condition to a heightened risk of heart failure.

    NAFLD, as it is called for short, is increasing rapidly because of rising rates of overweight and obesity, the researchers noted.

    They reviewed ...

    Obesity Rates Continue to Climb Among U.S. Kids, Teens

    For the first time ever, more than 1 in 5 American kids is obese.

    From 2011 to 2012 and again from 2017 to 2020, rates of obesity rose for kids between 2 and 5 years of age as well as 12- to 19-year-olds, a new analysis of nationwide health survey data shows. And the uptick was true for U.S. kids of every race and ethnic background, according to study leader Amanda Staiano.

    "The pro...

    Fewer Americans Are Dying of Heart Disease Than a Decade Ago

    Deaths from heart-related causes have dropped over the past 20 years, though differences persist by race and ethnicity as well as where people live and their access to care.

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), which partially funded the research, detailed the results of three papers. The findings were published July 18 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation

    Who'll Get Long COVID? Just a Look at a Patient Gives Clues

    Sometimes just looking at a person can give clues to their likelihood of developing long COVID after a bout with the virus.

    For example, obese people are five times more likely to suffer long COVID symptoms that persist at least three months after their infection clears, a major new U.S. s...

    Think You're at High Risk of Prostate Cancer? Healthy Living Can Slash Odds for Lethal Disease

    Genes can put some men at heightened risk of prostate cancer, but a new study suggests they can undo much of that potential harm with a healthy lifestyle.

    Researchers found that among men at increased genetic risk of prostate cancer, those who maintained a healthy lifestyle were much less likely to die of the disease over...

    About 1 in 7 U.S. Kindergarten Kids Now Obese

    Despite reports that rates of childhood obesity are decreasing, kids seem to be packing on pounds at younger ages.

    In 1998, just under 73% of children entering kindergarten in 1998 had a normal body mass index (BMI), while 15.1% were overweight, and 12% were obese.

    However, fast forward 12 years and just 69% of kids started kindergarten at a normal BMI, a new study finds.

    An...

    COVID Vaccine Saves Lives Regardless of Body Weight

    COVID vaccination is highly protective against severe disease in people of all body weights, new British research finds.

    The study of over 9 million adults found that those who'd received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine were strongly protected against hospitalization or death from the disease. And the effectiveness was just as great for obese people as those with a healthy weight.

    T...

    Biggest Weight Gain Now Comes Early in Adulthood

    The obesity epidemic isn't slowing down anytime soon, and new research delivers even worse news: Most American adults have not only gained more weight, but they gained most of it earlier in life.

    The statistics were grim: More than half of Americans in the representative sample had gained 5% or more body weight during a 10-year period. More than one-third of Americans had gained 10% or mo...

    Only 7% of American Adults in Good Cardiometabolic Health

    Less than 7% of U.S. adults are in good cardiometabolic shape, and new research warns the trend is only getting worse.

    Cardiometabolic health is an umbrella term that includes blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol, weight and/or the presence of heart disease.

    "While w...

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