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Could a Folic Acid Prescription Help Prevent Suicide?

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1 million Americans attempted suicide in 2020, and a new study is hinting at a potential way to reduce that risk: prescription folic acid.

The study, of more than 800,000 Americans in a health care database, found that when people were on prescription folic acid, their likelihood of being treated for

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 30, 2022
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  • Fitness Trackers Could Get You Stepping More -- Even If You Don't Look at Them

    Wearing a fitness tracker may help you get more steps in -- even if you never give it a glance.

    A new study found that folks who wore a pedometer averaged 318 more steps a day than those who didn't, even without specific

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 30, 2022
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  • Attending Church Might Lengthen Black Men's Lives

    Places of worship may provide respite for Black men that not only enhances their lives, but may extend them, new research suggests.

    "Black men have been oppressed, commodified, surveilled and criminalized like no other group in U.S. history and they often experience disproportionately high levels of social and psychological stress from

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 30, 2022
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  • Money, Good Info Can't Undo Resistance to COVID Vaccine: Study

    Public health officials tried everything to convince Americans to get vaccinated against COVID, including giving away cash, but that wasn't enough to change hesitant minds, a new study shows.

    Researchers were surprised by the findings.

    "There is literature and evidence from other vacci...

    Perceptive Pooches Can Smell Your Stress

    THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone knows dogs have a keen sense of smell, but now researchers have discovered they can even smell stress in the breath and sweat of humans.

    "Dogs possess an incredible sense of smell. Previous research has demonstrated their ability to ...

    Does Forced Cheerfulness at Work Lead to Burnout?

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Getting up on the wrong side of bed can happen to the best of folks. Not everyone greets every morning with a sunny disposition and big smile.

    But when a bad mood overlaps with work, many people feel pressured to just snap out of it and "get happy."

    Happiness From Home Buying Is Often Fleeting, Study Shows

    Home ownership may be the culmination of the American Dream, but a new study cautions that many people think they will be happier than they actually become once they are king or queen of their own castle.

    “We wanted to investigate whether home buyers correctly predict the long-term impac...

    Anxiety During Pregnancy Could Mean Earlier Delivery

    Too much anxiety isn't good for anyone, but a new study suggests it is particularly perilous for pregnant women because it can raise the chances of their child being born early.

    Given that finding, the researchers recommended that doctors screen for anxiety during the...

    Deep Brain Stimulation Offers Hope Against Severe OCD

    THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When traditional treatments fail to help patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), an implant that zaps the brain with electrical pulses just might, a new research review shows.

    ...

    Depression, PTSD Plague Flint Residents 5 Years After Water Crisis

    An unprecedented water crisis continues to take a heavy toll on the mental health of adults in Flint, Michigan, a large survey shows.

    Five years after the crisis, an estimated one in five — about 13,600 people — remained clinically depressed, the survey found. And about one in four — 1...

    Task Force Recommends Anxiety Screening for All Adults Under 65

    In what amounts to a public acknowledgement that anxiety disorders have run rampant during the pandemic, an influential expert panel is recommending for the first time that all Amer...

    Heart Disease Can Plague Adults With ADHD

    New research suggests that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may trigger more than just psychiatric complications: Adults suffering from ADHD may also be more likely to develop some type of cardiovascular disease.

    "Clinicians need to c...

    Depression Affects Almost 1 in 10 Americans

    Nearly 10% of Americans suffer from depression, with the mood disorder increasing fastest among teens and young adults, a new study finds.

    Between 2015 and 2020, incidence of depression reached 9% among Americans 12 and older. Among teens and young adults, the depression rate stood at 17% in 2020, the researchers found.

    "

    Mental Skills Slow With Age, But Seniors Gain in Other Ways: Study

    Seniors, there's good news and bad from a new study of mental health. The brain-centered research confirms that mental skills do decline with age -- but it also finds many people over 60 having better psychological health than folks in their 20s.

    "We wanted to better understand the interplay between cognition and mental health across aging, and whether they rely on activation of similar o...

    Seniors, This Daily Routine May Keep You Sharper, Happier

    Older adults who rise and shine early every day may have sharper minds and fewer depression symptoms, a new study suggests.

    The researchers found that U.S. adults aged 65 and older who typically got up early — before 7 a.m. — then stayed active throughout the day performed better on tests of memory and thinking than their peers with less "robust" daily routines. They were also less li...

    Pregnancy Undermines Body Image in Half of Women

    Many women are unhappy with how their bodies look both during and after pregnancy, and it's an issue that can trigger postpartum depression and eating disorders, a new study suggests.

    Researchers from...

    Pot Use in Early Pregnancy Linked to Long-Term Mental Health Issues in Kids

    Using marijuana after the first weeks of pregnancy is linked to mental health issues in children that linger well into early adolescence, a new study shows.

    Exposure to cannabis after about five to six weeks of fetal development was associated with attention, social and behavioral problems, according to...

    Timing of Meals Could Alter Your Mood

    The time of day -- or especially night -- that you eat may affect your mental health, according to a small new study.

    Researchers created a simulated shift-work schedule and found increases in depression and anxiety for those eating at odd hours.

    "Our findings provide evidence for the timing of food intake as a novel strategy to potentially minimize mood ...

    As Thermometer Rises, So Does Hate Speech on Twitter

    Internet hotheads are often literally that, with hateful tweets rising in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports.

    Temperatures higher than 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to heavy increases in online hate messages, according to a review of more than 4 billion English-language tweets.

    The researchers identified a “feel-good window” between 54 and 70 degree...

    Nearly 1 in 4 Young U.S. Adults Sought Mental Health Care During Pandemic

    The stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic may have led to a significant jump in the number of young American adults seeking help for mental health woes, new data shows.

    Between 2019 and 2021, the percentage of American adults overall who said they'd sought and received any mental health treatment over the ...

    Stories of Difficult Conception, Birth Can Boost Appreciation of Life

    Stories about their difficult birth or their parents' fertility challenges can give adult children a more grateful, upbeat attitude towards their lives, British researchers suggest.

    They studied the messages as well as how they were delivered, interviewing people about the stor...

    'Digital Self-Harm': When Teens Cyberbully Themselves

    Up to 9% of American teens say they've engaged in what's known as "digital self-harm" -- anonymously posting negative comments about themselves on social media.

    As is the case with acts of physical self-harm such as cutting, this "virtual" self-harm is associated with a higher risk for thinking about or attempting suicide, according to a startling

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 2, 2022
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  • Many Teens Easily Fooled by Fake Online Health Messages

    Many teenagers have a hard time discerning between accurate health messages and “fake news," a new study finds.

    Presented with a choice between fake and true health messages, about two in five teenagers considered both messages equally trustworthy, researchers found...

    Half of Moms of Children With Autism Have Depression

    While half of mothers of children with autism suffer symptoms of depression, a new study has discovered that did not raise the risk of behavioral problems for their kids.

    It was both a surprising and heartenin...

    Let the Sun In: More Natural Light at Home Lightens Your Mood

    It's safe to say that when searching for somewhere to live most people prefer open, airy spaces over dark and dingy ones. Now, new research suggests why: Homes filled with lots of natural light makes for happier residents.

    "We sought to explore the relationship between

    Hate Listening to People Chewing? You Might Have Misophonia

    Most people have cherished memories of their grandparents reading to them as children.

    Ekaterina Pesheva's memories are quite different.

    "I remember distinctly being very irritated and very angry listening to my grandmother reading children's books to me, like fairy tales," said Pesheva, 48, who lives in Boston. "I would become aware of her mouth getting dry, and that, for whatever ...

    Magic Mushroom Hallucinogen May Treat Problem Drinking

    Jon Kostas, a lifelong resident of New York City, started bar-hopping at age 13. At the height of his alcoholism, he was consuming as many as 30 drinks a night.

    Desperate for a way out, Kostas, 32, turned to a new therapy: psilocybin -- the psychedelic compound found in so-cal...

    People Underestimate Impact of Random Acts of Kindness

    Buying someone a cup of coffee might seem like no big deal, but a new study shows that small acts of kindness have a bigger impact than people believe.

    In a series of experiments, researchers found that those on the receiving end of a kind gesture typically appreciated it more than the giver anticipated. One reason, the findings suggest,...

    'News Addiction' Is Common and Can Harm Your Mental Health

    From the COVID-19 pandemic and the spread of monkeypox to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, school shootings and devastating wildfires, there's been no lack of doom and gloom lately, and many folks are glued to the news.

    For more than 16% of people, however, compulsive news watching can be seriously problematic and is linked to a host of physical and

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 24, 2022
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  • As Pandemic Eases, It's Boom Times for Cosmetic Surgeons

    Even after dropping 25 pounds, Megan Gilbert still had some insecurities when she looked in the mirror.

    "After breastfeeding two kids and losing weight, my breasts no longer looked how I wanted them to," she said. "And I thought, 'Why be unhappy with this one part of my body after working so hard to make all these other improvements in my life?'"

    So Gilbert, 35, did something about ...

    Poor Sleep Can Make Folks Selfish, Study Finds

    The health risks of losing sleep are well known, ranging from heart disease to depression, but who knew that too little sleep can also make you selfish?

    That's the takeaway of new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

    "This new work demonstrates that a lack of sleep not only damages the health of an individual, but degrades social interactions between individuals and...

    LSD Is Making a Comeback Among Young Americans

    If you think hallucinogens like LSD are a thing of the past, think again.

    New research estimates that the use of mind-altering LSD rose from less than 1% in 2002 to 4% in 2019 among people aged 18 to 25. And, overall, 5.5 million Americans used some kind of hallucinogen in 2019.

    "According to our results, hallucin...

    Family History of Mental Illness Ups Odds for Postpartum Depression

    Pregnant women with a family history of any mental health condition may be at increased risk of depression after giving birth, a new research review finds.

    In an analysis of 26 studies, researchers found that women with a family history of psychiatric diagnoses were at heightened risk of

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 22, 2022
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  • Dealing With Grief on the Cancer Journey

    Cancer isn't just a physical struggle but also an emotional one, as patients, survivors and their loved ones experience grief and loss throughout the experience.

    Gabrielle Alvarez, a social worker at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, offered some tips to help patients and caregivers manage their feelings.

    ...

    Hispanic Americans' Suicide Rates Are Rising

    Suicide is a major public health issue for all Americans, but new research suggests it is a particularly pressing problem for Hispanics.

    Between 2010 and 2020, the suicide rate among Hispanic adults increased by more than 70%, while the Hispanic population in the United States only grew by about 25%, the researcher...

    Too Few Psychiatric Beds: Psychiatrists' Group Takes Aim at Ongoing Crisis

    Amid a stark shortage of psychiatric beds that only worsened for millions suffering from mental illnesses during the pandemic, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) is rolling out a new model that can help communities determine exactly how many beds they need.

    Having enough in-patient beds would cut down on overcrowding in emergency departments and early release from needed care, th...

    Veterans Often Reluctant to Admit Struggles With Sleep, Addictions

    A new study of U.S. military veterans reveals they are more comfortable getting help for physical ills than for mental health issues.

    "The majority of participants indicated they would be willing to seek treatment for both physical and mental health problems. However, they reported significantly greater willingness to seek treatment for physical than mental health conditions," said princi...

    Breast Cancer Treatment Effects on Sex Life a Hidden Burden

    Women with breast cancer commonly see their sexual health decline, yet their doctors aren't telling them what to expect -- or what to do about it.

    Those are among the findings of a new study that asked breast cancer patients about their sexual well-being. It showed that most women had sexu...

    Loneliness Can Be a Real Heartbreaker, Cardiac Experts Warn

    Social isolation and loneliness put people at a 30% higher risk of heart attack, stroke or death from either, a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    The statement also highlights the lack of data on interventions that could improve heart health in isolated or lonely people. It was published Aug. 4 in the

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 5, 2022
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  • Mental Health Issues Can Plague Families of Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

    Kids with type 1 diabetes and their closest relatives are more likely to experience mental health issues than people without the disease, Swedish researchers report.

    “Many clinicians assume intuitively that diabetes in a child negatively affects the mental health of both the patient and the family members,” said study co-author Agnieszka Butwicka, an assistant professor at the Karolin...

    Skip the Texts: Face-to-Face Meetings Make College Students Happier

    In a world where everyone spends more and more time with eyes fixed on their phones, new research suggests young people feel happier after socializing with friends in person rather than virtually.

    The conclusion is an outgrowth of nearly four years spent analyzing how social habits of more than 3,000 college students affected their state of mind.

    "The findings of

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2022
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  • Lifestyle May Be Key to Helping You Avoid Dementia

    Socializing, taking classes and exercising may boost your brain's cognitive reserve and stave off memory and thinking problems down the road, a new study suggests.

    Cognitive reserve refers to the brain's ability to withstand the effects of diseases like Alzheimer's and not show signs of de...

    There's Stress, and Then There's 'Good Stress'

    A tight deadline at work. A tough exam at school. A big vacation that requires tons of planning. A home repair that's gone awry.

    These sources of stress are anything but pleasant, but a new study suggests that they might actually be good f...

    Too Little Sleep May Harm Young Kids' Brains

    For peak performance, school-age children need more than a healthy diet and exercise. They also need plenty of sleep.

    A new study finds that elementary school kids who get less than nine hours of sleep each night show significant differences in some brain regions responsible for memory, intelligence and well-being compared to those who get the advised nine to 12 hours' sleep.

    “We ...

    Sports Help Kids Gain a Quality Key to Adult Success

    A quality called “grit” can help a person achieve their long-term goals, some experts say.

    And playing sports as a kid -- or even as an adult -- can help a person gain that passion and perseverance, according to new research that found adults who played sports as kids scored higher on a measurement of grit than adults who never played or said they quit.

    “Kids who

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • Work Worries Keep Lots of Americans Awake Sunday Nights

    Don't be afraid of Sunday night.

    Good sleep habits can ward off the so-called “Sunday scaries” — the worry about returning to work on Monday morning that keeps many folks tossing and turning on Sunday night.

    A recent American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 1, 2022
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  • 8/9 -- Study Casts Doubt on 'Chemical Imbalance' Theory of Depression

    The notion that depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain has become widespread among the general public.

    But there's actually no hard evidence that the brain chemical

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • Could a Common Diabetes Drug Ease Bipolar Disorder?

    A half-century-old diabetes drug appears to help treat bipolar disorder by reversing patients' insulin resistance, according to a small-scale clinical trial.

    Bipolar patients who responded to the drug metformin experienced improvement in their

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • Most Post-Stroke Depression Still Goes Untreated

    While depression is common after a stroke, most stroke patients who need mental health care aren't getting the help they need, new research reveals.

    Roughly one in three stroke victims have depression. But about two-thirds of those received no mental health treatment. Patients who were older, men, Black people or Hispanic folks were even less likely to get help, the study found.

    “...

    Lonely Childhoods Make Adult Drinking Problems More Likely

    Having friends in childhood may help keep you clean and sober as a young adult, new research suggests.

    Researchers from Arizona State University (ASU) interviewed more than 300 college students who participated in assessments that focused on childhood loneliness, stress levels and drinking behaviors. The results determined there was a link between feelings of loneliness in their pre-adole...

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