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20 Jul

When Mom is BRCA+, Should the Kids Be Told?

Teens and young adults adapt well to family genetic information, reporting relatively low psychological stress, researchers say.

Health News Results - 453

Eating Lots of 'Ultra-Processed' Foods Could Harm Your Brain

Chips, pizza, cookies: Delicious, but a diet full of ultra-processed foods like these may contribute to brain deterioration, researchers report.

Ultra-processed foods have lots of added and unhealthy ingredients, such as sugar, salt, fat, artificial colors and preservatives. Examples include frozen meals, soft drinks, hot dogs and cold cuts, fast food, packaged cookies, cakes and sal...

Severe Seizures Are Rising, Especially Among Minorities

Growing numbers of Americans are suffering prolonged, life-threatening seizures known as status epilepticus, and Black people are nearly twice as likely to experience these seizures as white people.

These are the main findings from new research looking at hospitalizations for status epilepticus from 2010 to 2019 across the United States. Status epilepticus refers to ...

Vicious Cycle: Epilepsy Seizures Could Encourage More Seizures

Seizures tend to get progressively worse over time in people with epilepsy, and a new study in mice suggests why that might be the case.

Seizures appear to prompt the brains of mice to produce more myelin, the insulating layer around nerve cells, researchers from Stanford University found.

This essentially rewires the brain, creating a vicious cycle in which more seizures cause more...

'COVID-somnia' May Be Easing as Americans Report Better Sleep

Finally, more than two years into the pandemic, Americans are sleeping better.

A new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) found that 31% of people have had insomnia since the pandemic began. That was much lower — a 25% decrease — compared to the...

Second Death in Trial of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Is Raising Concerns

Two people have now died from brain hemorrhages that may be linked to an experimental Alzheimer's drug, calling into question the medication's safety.

A 65-year-old woman with early-stage Alzheimer's recently died from a massive brain bleed that some researchers link to lecanemab, an antibody drug designed to bind to and remove amyloid-beta from the brain, according to a report published ...

As Kids' Obesity Rises, Brain Health Declines: Study

Kids who are overweight or obese often struggle with school work, and now new research provides clues on how excess weight may harm the developing brain.

“The main takeaway is to raise awareness about brain health consequences of obesity besides physical health consequences, especially since obesity rates are very high and continue to rise,” said study author

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 29, 2022
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  • Lead Toxin Concerns Spur Recall of Toddler Sippy Cups

    Parents whose toddlers use certain Green Sprouts bottles or cups need to discard them immediately because of a risk of lead exposure, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

    When the base of the cups come apart, it exposes a solder dot that contains lead, according to a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 28, 2022
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  • Berry Good for You: Some Foods Can Strengthen Your Brain

    Eating more berries and drinking tea may help slow mental decline as you age, new research suggests.

    In a study of more than 900 adults, researchers found that foods like these -- containing antioxidant flavonols -- delivered brain benefits to older adults. Flavonols are found in fruits like berries, green leafy vegetables, tea and wine.

    For example, people who ate a serving o...

    Even a Little Drinking in Pregnancy Can Reshape Fetal Brain

    Exposure to even low levels of alcohol while in the womb can change the structure of the fetus' brain, according to Austrian researchers.

    The study results suggest that pregnant women should strictly avoid alcohol, one author said.

    “Unfortunately, many pregnant women are unaware of the influenc...

    Seizure Risk Rises in Months After COVID

    A bout of COVID-19, even a milder one, may raise the risk of having a seizure in the next six months, a large new study suggests.

    Researchers found that of over 300,000 Americans who had suffered a case of COVID-19 or the flu, COVID sufferers were 55% more likely to be diagnosed with a seizure or epilepsy in the next six months.

    And a deeper look showed that the increased risk was a...

    Brain Imaging Shows How Young Kids Learn Quicker Than Grownups

    Ever wonder why kids seem to pick up new knowledge and skills faster than adults?

    A new study attributes the kids' mental prowess to differences in a brain messenger called GABA.

    "Our results show that children of elementary school age can learn more items within a given period of time than adults, making learning more efficient in children," said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 17, 2022
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  • Aerobic Exercise Reinvigorates the Aging Brain

    Regular aerobic exercise improves blood flow to the brain, which should help keep seniors sharper as they age, a new trial has revealed.

    At least a half-hour of power walking or jogging four to five times a week promoted better blood flow in and out of the brain among a small group of older adults, said study co-author

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 16, 2022
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  • Roberta Flack Has ALS, Can No Longer Sing

    Singer Roberta Flack has the incurable disease ALS and can't sing, but she plans to stay active on other projects, her manager said Monday.

    Flack, 85, is a Grammy winner best known for hits that include “Killing Me Softly With His Song” and “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face.”

    Born in North Carolina and raised in Virginia, Flack became a star when Clint Eastwood used one ...

    Binge Eating Disorder Looks Different in Brains of Boys and Girls

    The brains of girls and boys who have binge eating disorder show key differences, according to a new study.

    That's an important finding, researchers say, because both genders struggle with eating disorders, yet treatments are mainly targeted at girls.

    "Males have been excluded from rese...

    Alzheimer's Experts Offer Tips for 'Dementia-Friendly' Homes

    While most homes aren't designed to be dementia-friendly, they can easily be adapted, according to a national Alzheimer's disease group.

    "Virtually every aspect of a home can affect the person's quality of life," said Charles Fuschillo Jr., president and CEO of the Alzheimer's Fo...

    Science Reveals Why Eye Contact Is Tough for People With Autism

    A common characteristic of autism is a reluctance to make eye contact with others, and researchers now think they know where in the brain this comes from.

    Brain scans show that folks with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) had significantly less activity in their dorsal parietal cortex during eye-to-eye contact, compared to people without ASD, researchers report.

    This brain region has b...

    Growing Up With Lead in Drinking Water May Dull Brain in Old Age

    Lead is known to damage young children's brains, and a new study suggests the effects may still be apparent in old age.

    Researchers found that among nearly 1,100 older U.S. adults, those who grew up in cities with lead-contaminated drinking water generally scored worse on tests of memory and thinking skills.

    The findings, experts said, suggest that older adults who were exposed to l...

    Could 'Food Stamps' Program Give Memory a Boost?

    Signing up for "food stamps" might help lower-income seniors preserve their mental capabilities, a new U.S. study suggests.

    Researchers found that eligible older adults who used the government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — commonly called food stamps — had two fewer years of mental...

    Targeting Key Cells in Spinal Cord Got Paralyzed Patients Walking Again

    In an advance in treating spinal cord injuries, researchers have pinpointed nerve cells that are key to allowing people with paralysis to walk again.

    The findings come, in part, from nine patients involved in an ongoing Swiss study that is seeking to restore movement to people with paralysis.

    All nine rapidly regained the ability to stand and walk with the help of implants that...

    Why Patients on Ventilators May Take Weeks to Regain Consciousness

    While it can take some time for COVID patients who are taken off ventilators to regain consciousness, a new study suggests this is not necessarily a bad omen.

    Instead, it might be the way the body protects the brain from oxygen deprivation as a patient starts to recover.

    Physicians should take these lengthy recovery times into account when determining a patient's prognosis, the rese...

    Ovary Removal Before Menopause Could Raise a Woman's Odds for Parkinson's

    Women who have both ovaries removed before menopause may have a heightened risk of developing Parkinson's disease years later, a new study suggests.

    Looking at decades of data on more than 5,000 women, researchers ...

    1 in 5 People Saved by CPR Recall 'Lucid Dying'

    People have long talked about having near-death experiences in which they felt they were looking down on themselves while others tried to save them.

    Now researchers have documented some of those experiences. In a new study, investigators found that about 20% of patients recalled lucid experiences of death that occurred while they were seemingly unconscious and dying.

    “These lucid...

    Clocks 'Fall Back' on Sunday: Sleep Expert Offers Tips to Adjust

    It's time for time to fall back an hour, but fortunately that change is more in line with humans' circadian rhythm than springing forward.

    This provides an opportunity for people to “fix” their circadian rhythm, that 24-hour body clock that regulates hormone release and temperature, said an expert from Baylor College of Medicine who offered some tips.

    “While the end of dayli...

    Autism Alters Brain in Major Ways, Study Finds

    Autism is a more comprehensive disorder than previously thought, and appears to arise from brain changes located throughout the cerebral cortex, not just in specific areas, a new study reports.

    Because of autism's specific symptoms, scientists had thought the disorder was likely caused by changes in brain regions believed to affect social behavior and language.

    But the new study -- ...

    What's Better for Your Brain, Crossword Puzzles or Computer Games?

    Older adults looking to slow down memory loss might find some help in a classic brain-teaser: the crossword puzzle.

    That's the suggestion of a small study that followed older adults with mild cognitive impairment — problems with memory and thinking that may progress to dementia over time. Researchers found that those randomly assigned to do crossword puzzles for 18 months showed a small...

    Scientists Use Sound to Ease Patients' Chronic Nightmares

    People plagued by frequent nightmares may find relief from hearing a specific sound as they sleep, a new, small study suggests.

    It's estimated that about 4% of adults have nightmares that are frequent and distressing enough to impair their sleep and daily functioning. In some cases, the nightmares are related to an underlying condition, like post-traumatic stress disorder (

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 27, 2022
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  • Brain Waves Could Help Guide Concussion Diagnosis, Treatment

    A particular brain wave may help diagnose concussions in high school football players and predict when it's safe for them to return to play, new research suggests.

    Delta waves are markers of brain injury and perhaps healing. They tend to decrease with age, but researchers found increased levels of these lo...

    Deadly Aneurysm-Linked Strokes Are Rising, Especially Among Black Americans

    An often-deadly type of stroke -- subarachnoid hemorrhage -- is on the upswing in the United States, particularly among Black people, new research shows.

    Unlike the more common ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage happens when there is bleeding in the space between the ...

    Keeping Blood Pressure in Check Could Cut Your Odds for Dementia

    Controlling high blood pressure in older adults may be one of the "best bets" for reducing the risk of developing dementia, Australian researchers report.

    "Given population aging and the substantial costs of caring for people with dementia, even a small reduction could have considerable global impact,...

    Toddlers Nap a Lot - and Then They Don't. New Research Uncovers Why

    Why do some preschoolers refuse naps while others have a meltdown without an afternoon snooze? Researchers suspect it may have a lot to do with a specific memory-related part of the brain.

    While young children all need a lot of sleep, they do vary widely in when they stop napping during the day: Some leave naps behind by the time they are 3, while many others happily take an afternoon nap...

    Scientists Probe How Sleep Helps Create Lasting Memories

    It's a question many have asked: How are memories made to last?

    Now, a new study claims they are solidified during sleep through the interplay of two distinct brain regions.

    Memories are set in the brain as it cycles between slow-wave and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which happens about five times a night, re...

    Video Games May Bring Cognitive Benefits to Kids: Study

    School-age kids who spend hours a day playing video games may outperform their peers on certain tests of mental agility, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with children who never played video games, those who regularly spent hours gaming had higher scores on two standard cognitive tests: one measuring short-term memory and another gauging impulse control.

    Experts...

    Science Reveals Genes That Help Drive Dyslexia

    Some children struggle to read or spell because of a condition called dyslexia that is known to run in families.

    Now, researchers report they have pinpointed a large number of genes responsible for the disorder.

    "Our findings show that common genetic differences have very similar effects in boys and...

    Even a Pasted-On Smile Can Lighten Your Mood

    If you're feeling a little low, smile anyway. That alone could shift your mood.

    This idea is known as the facial feedback hypothesis, and researchers set out to either prove or disprove the theory in a new global study, finding strong evidence that posed smiles ...

    1 in 10 U.S. Seniors Has Dementia; Minorities Hit Hardest

    One in 10 older Americans has dementia, and twice as many have mild mental impairment, a new study finds.

    As the nation's population grows older, the burden on families and society is likely to grow, and minorities will be affected most, experts say.

    "As the population in the U.S. ages, it is projected that there will be more cases of cognitive impairment, unless and until effective...

    Cellular 'Fix' Treatment Shows Promise Against ALS in Small Study

    Researchers have made early progress toward a new approach to treating the deadly brain disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): using patients' own immune system T cells.

    ALS is a rare condition that kills nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord...

    Curbing Football Drills Could Make High School Football Safer

    Tackling drills are typically a staple of high school football practices, but new research suggests dropping them from training might cut the risk of head hits.

    Using mouth guards with sensors that recorded every head hit, researchers found players who spent 5,144 minutes in non-contact practice had just 310 head hits, while those who had nearly 7,000 minutes in high-speed training with c...

    Study Casts Doubt on Mediterranean Diet's Benefit to Brain

    A healthy diet might not protect you from dementia as some have suggested, according to a new Swedish study.

    The Mediterranean diet — which includes lots of vegetables, fruits, fish and healthy fats and little dairy or meat — has been touted as brain-protective. Bu...

    Group of Brain Cells in Dish Can Play Computer Game Pong

    Scientists have taught a brain cell culture living in a laboratory dish to play the vintage table-tennis video game Pong.

    It's the first demonstration that a collection of lab-grown brain cells can be taught to perform goal-directed tasks, the Australian researchers report.

    They call the culture...

    Scientists Transplant Human Brain Cells Into Rat Brains, a Boon to Research

    Human brain tissue has been successfully transplanted into the brains of rats using a cutting-edge experimental procedure, say researchers. They envision the achievement as a promising new frontier in medical research.

    Groups of living human nerve cells have become integrated into the brains of laboratory rats, creating hybrid brain circuits that can be activated through input from the ra...

    When Stroke Harms One Side of a Newborn's Brain, Other Side Takes Over

    Many language skills are "left brain," but a new study shows that when a newborn suffers a stroke in that region, the brain is able to shift those language duties to the right.

    The researchers said the findings highlight the striking malleabil...

    Mouse Study Points to Why Alzheimer's Affects Women More Than Men

    Women are diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease twice as often as men. Now researchers think they know why.

    A new study found evidence in mice and human brain tissue that may explain the differences, according to researchers from Case Western University in Cleveland.

    Female brains showed a higher ...

    Fish Oil Could Strengthen Your Aging Brain

    Fish has been dubbed "brain food," and a new study suggests that may really be true for middle-aged adults.

    Researchers found that among more than 2,000 middle-aged people, those with higher blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids performed b...

    Petting a Dog Does Your Brain Some Good

    If you have dogs, you probably already know that petting them can give you a lift.

    Researchers set out to prove that using technology to show what happens in the brain when stroking or sitting next to a dog. They also compared that to petting a stuffed animal.

    They found that when study participants viewed, felt and touched real dogs it led to increasingly high levels of activity ...

    Scientists Propose New Mechanism Driving Alzheimer's Disease

    Amyloid-beta plaques have long been linked to Alzheimer's disease, with some scientists theorizing that the plaques actually cause the degenerative brain disease.

    But a new study suggests that the plaques are actually a symptom of what's going on in the brain, rather than the cause of Alzheimer's.

    ...

    Brain Secrets of the Super-Sharp 'Super-Agers'

    Researchers have discovered another clue as to how some older people stay sharp as a tack into their 80s and beyond: Their brain cells are really big.

    The study focused on what scientists have dubbed "super-agers" — a select group of elderly adults who have the memory skills of people decades younger.

    The researchers found that in a memory-related area of the brain, super-agers ha...

    FDA Approves New ALS Drug Despite Uncertain Data

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday gave its approval to a new drug for ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

    But appro...

    New Alzheimer's Drug Shows Promise in Phase 3 Clinical Trial

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2022 (HealthDay) -- Japanese drugmaker Eisai on Wednesday said its experimental drug lecanemab helped slow thinking declines among people in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    The findings from a phase 3 clinical trial have yet to be peer-reviewed in any medical journal. But accor...

    Study Points to Jobs With Highest Risk for ALS

    People who work in manufacturing, welding and chemical operations and are exposed to hazardous chemicals may face a higher risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study found.

    "This study shows that certain occupational settings and exposures increase one's chances of...

    Hints That Experimental Drug Might Curb a Form of ALS

    People with a rare genetic form of ALS may benefit from extended use of an investigational drug, a new study shows.

    The medication, tofersen, benefited patients with mutations of the gene SOD1. These mutations create a misfolded version of a protein, which leads to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also kn...

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