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The Most Common Form of Bullying Isn't Physical or Verbal

The most widespread form of bullying isn't physical acts like pushing or kicking, nor is it verbal threats or derogatory remarks. Far and away bullies' top tactic is social exclusion.

Also known as "relational aggression," this involves shutting out peers from group activities and spreading false rumors about them. And research underscores the damage done by this behavior.

“When a...

Hate Listening to People Chewing? You Might Have Misophonia

Most people have cherished memories of their grandparents reading to them as children.

Ekaterina Pesheva's memories are quite different.

"I remember distinctly being very irritated and very angry listening to my grandmother reading children's books to me, like fairy tales," said Pesheva, 48, who lives in Boston. "I would become aware of her mouth getting dry, and that, for whatever ...

People Underestimate Impact of Random Acts of Kindness

Buying someone a cup of coffee might seem like no big deal, but a new study shows that small acts of kindness have a bigger impact than people believe.

In a series of experiments, researchers found that those on the receiving end of a kind gesture typically appreciated it more than the giver anticipated. One reason, the findings suggest,...

'News Addiction' Is Common and Can Harm Your Mental Health

From the COVID-19 pandemic and the spread of monkeypox to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, school shootings and devastating wildfires, there's been no lack of doom and gloom lately, and many folks are glued to the news.

For more than 16% of people, however, compulsive news watching can be seriously problematic and is linked to a host of physical and

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 24, 2022
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  • Poor Sleep Can Make Folks Selfish, Study Finds

    The health risks of losing sleep are well known, ranging from heart disease to depression, but who knew that too little sleep can also make you selfish?

    That's the takeaway of new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

    "This new work demonstrates that a lack of sleep not only damages the health of an individual, but degrades social interactions between individuals and...

    Too Much TV Time May Really Harm Your Brain

    Older adults who get a lot of "screen time" may have an increased risk of developing dementia — but a lot depends on what type of screen they use, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among older British adults, those w...

    Unrelated Folks Who Look Alike Share Similar DNA

    A person's unrelated lookalike, commonly known as a doppelganger, may actually share genes that affect not only how they appear, but also their behavior.

    In a new study, scientists did DNA analysis on 32 sets of virtual twins — people with strong facial similarities — and found they possessed similar genetic variants.

    “Our study provides a rare insight into human likeness by...

    Dogs Do Cry When Reunited With Owners

    Humans and dogs undoubtedly share a powerful bond, but can dogs cry when overcome with emotion?

    According to a recent study, possibly the first to try to answer that question, canine's eyes do indeed well up with tears, most often when they are reunited with their beloved owner.

    “We ...

    Everyday Activities That Can Cut Your Odds for Dementia

    Reading, doing yoga and spending time with family and friends might help lower your risk of dementia, a new study suggests.

    "Previous studies have shown that leisure activities were associated with various health benefits, such as a lower cancer risk, a reduction of

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 12, 2022
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  • Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass Public Health Officials

    U.S. health officials are in the crosshairs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, facing threats and harassment from the public they serve.

    And a growing percentage of U.S. adults are fine with that, according to a new Cornell University study.

    Analysis of public opinion ...

    Does Your Cat Play Well With Others? Hormones Might Be Why

    While cats often prefer to be alone and closely guard their territory, some seem to thrive on togetherness even at a crowded shelter.

    Chalk it up to chemistry.

    That's the takeaway of a new study that investigated the role hormones and gut bacteria play in felines' social

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 28, 2022
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  • More Evidence Fitness Trackers Can Boost Your Health

    Your fitness tracker, pedometer or smartwatch may motivate you to exercise more and lose weight, Australian researchers say.

    In a large research review, the investigators found that tracking your activity might inspire you to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 26, 2022
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  • Americans Are Getting Better at Cooperating With Strangers

    American society may seem more fractured than ever, but cooperation among total strangers has been on the upswing for decades, researchers in China say.

    Their conclusion emerged from an analysis of more than 500 studies that tracked cooperation patterns over the past six decades.

    The upshot, ...

    Can Anxiety Disorders Pass From Parent to Child?

    From the ongoing pandemic and the monkeypox outbreak to the charged political landscape, New York City mom and entrepreneur Lyss Stern has been increasingly anxious.

    Stern worries that she will pass all of this fretting down to her 8-year-old daughter, and a new study suggests she just might.

    "Children may be more likely to learn anxious behavior if it is being displayed by their s...

    Friends Want to Hear From You More Than You Think

    If you've ever hesitated to text or email friends you haven't seen in a while, a new study has a reassuring message: They'll probably appreciate it more than you think.

    In a series of experiments involving nearly 6,000 adults, researchers found that, in general, people underestimated the value of "reaching out" to someone in their social circle they hadn't contacted in a while.

    Reci...

    Being Social May Be Key to 'Sense of Purpose' as You Age

    Want to feel you matter after you retire? Start socializing, a new study suggests.

    Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis found that positive connections with other people were associated with a sense of purposefulness in older adults.

    Having a sense of purpose is...

    Gardening Can Blossom Into Better Mental Health

    If you are feeling stressed and depressed, new research suggests that grabbing a trowel and getting your hands dirty may improve your mood.

    Researchers found that tending to plants can reap mental health benefits, even for first-time gardeners. The activity was linked to decreased stress, anxiety and depression in h...

    Age Big Factor in COVID Vaccine Views

    Your age may play a huge role in whether you'll decide to get a COVID vaccine, new research finds.

    Though vaccine hesitancy due to personal politics has drawn a lot of media attention, a University of Georgia study reveals it's not the only consideration.

    The link between vaccines a...

    Your Doctor's Gender, Race May Bias Your Treatment Outcome

    Deep-rooted bias may affect the way white patients physically respond to medical care provided by physicians of differing race or gender.

    Researchers assessed treatment reactions of nearly 200 white patients after they were randomly assigned to receive care from a male or female doctor who was either Black, white or Asian.

    White patients appeared to improve faster when treated by a...

    More Evidence Uber, Lyft Are Reducing Drunk Driving Crashes

    Using ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft can reduce the number of impaired drivers on the roads, potentially leading to fewer alcohol-related crashes, a new research review confirms.

    Review author Christopher Morrison, who studies drinking and the problems it spawns, including assaults, drunken driving and crashes, said the evidence is clear.

    "One way to prevent these probl...

    Muting Your Phone May Cause More Stress, Not Less

    Are you plagued by FOMO -- "fear of missing out"? Then silencing your smartphone may not be the stress-buster you think it is.

    That's the takeaway from a new study that found many folks check their phones a lot more when they're set to mute or vibrate than when they beep and ring.

    "Without any clear 'buzz' or sou...

    Smells Like Friendship: Similar Body Odors May Draw Folks Together

    You and your best friend may have your noses to thank in helping bring you together, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that pairs of friends who'd just "clicked" upon meeting tended to smell more alike, compared to random pairs of strangers. What's more, a high-tech electronic nose was able to predict, based on body odor, which strangers would hit it off during their first interacti...

    Squeaky or Furry: New Insights Into Dogs' Love of Toys

    What goes through your dog's mind when you tell him to find his favorite toy?

    Hungarian researchers say Fido relies on a mental image based on sensory features. Dogs call to mind the way that toy looks, feels and smells.

    The finding - from the Family Dog Project at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest - was recently published online in the journal

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 20, 2022
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  • Sleep Throughout the Lifespan: When You Get Best, Worst Slumber

    Americans are night owls at age 20, get the least sleep at 40, and then finally get more shut-eye after retirement.

    Those are among the key takeaways from a study that looked at the sleep patterns of Americans of all ages. In short, teenagers and young adults often fall asleep after midnight, while folks in their 40s go to bed earlier but devote the fewest hours to sleep.

    That might...

    Flu Shots Lag in States With Low COVID Vaccine Uptake

    Adult flu shots have slumped in states with low COVID-19 vaccination rates, suggesting that COVID-19 vaccination behavior may have spilled over to flu-vaccine behavior, new research indicates.

    University of California, Los Angeles researchers point to declining trust in public health agencies caused by controversy over

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 16, 2022
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  • Youth Drinking, Pot Use Went Down During Pandemic

    The COVID-19 pandemic changed kids' lives in many respects, and sometimes for the better. Pot use, drinking, smoking and vaping all fell among U.S. youth, likely because they had to spend more time at home and less time with their friends, researchers say.

    The findings are based on an analysis of 49 studies.

    "One of the driving factors for youth substance use is access to substance...

    High Hopes: Optimism Helps Women Live Longer

    The key to a long life may be your attitude.

    Researchers at Harvard studied the impact of optimism on women's lifespans, finding that optimism was associated with greater longevity, such as living past age 90.

    Lead study author Hayami Koga, a PhD candidate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, decided instead of studying risk factors, she wanted to look at posi...

    Bitter or Savory, Taste Genes Could Influence Your Diet

    People who have never outgrown an aversion to broccoli, or an addiction to potato chips, can place part of the blame on their genes, preliminary research suggests.

    The study, of over 6,200 adults, turned up correlations between certain taste-related genes and people's preferences for particular

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 14, 2022
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  • Americans Think They Eat Healthier Than They Really Do

    Many people think they make healthy food choices, but they may be viewing their diet through rose-colored glasses.

    That's the main finding of a new study that aimed to identify disconnects between how healthfully Americans think they eat and how they actually do.

    "It appears difficult for adults in the United States to accurately assess the quality of their diet, and most adults bel...

    Why Getting Along in Preschool Is So Important

    The expression "plays well with others" is often tossed around to describe people who are less likely to ruffle feathers, and new research shows these sandbox skills really matter.

    It turns out that kids who play well with others in preschool are less likely to experience mental health issues ...

    Teens May Have Eaten Healthier During Pandemic

    Of all the health harms the pandemic brought, new research has uncovered one positive effect: For the first time in 30 years, teens' consumption of junk food fell following school closures, social restrictions and more parents working from home.

    The study included 452 participants,...

    Gruesome Warnings on Cigarette Packs Have Smokers Hiding Them, but not Quitting

    Graphic images on cigarette packs of diseased body parts and other smoking horrors may not have the desired effect on smokers themselves, a new study finds.

    Many smokers kept cigarette packs with gruesome warning images hidden, but the images didn't have a lasting effect on their smoking habits, researchers discovered after presenting thousands of specially designed cigarette packs to smo...

    Limiting TV to Under 1 Hour a Day Could Slash Heart Disease Rates: Study

    It's tempting to binge-watch TV shows, and it might be hard to get off the couch after just one or two episodes.

    But it could be worth it.

    Researchers calculated that if people committed to watching just under an hour of TV a day, 11% of coronary heart disease cases could be eliminated.

    Thoug...

    Restful Night's Sleep More Likely for Men Than Women

    For many women, having it all may mean forgoing a decent night's sleep.

    Women in the United States are less likely to get a good night's sleep and more likely to report daytime sleepiness than men, a new survey shows.

    The online poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults found that women are 1.5 times more l...

    A Lover's Embrace May Calm Women More Than Men

    Is an upcoming final exam or big-time job interview stressing you out?

    Hug your honey.

    That's the takeaway from new research that showed how embracing your significant other can help calm women.

    But sorry, guys, the same isn't true for you, according to the study published May 18 in the journal PLOS ONE.

    "As a woman, hugging your romantic partner can prevent t...

    Folks Choose Healthier Foods When Around 'Outsiders'

    Will it be a cheeseburger or a salad? What will they think of me?

    A new study finds you're more likely to choose to eat healthy if you're with an "outsider" because you don't want them to have a poor opinion of you.

    The study consisted of a series of experiments with several hundred adults in a large...

    COVID Rules Don't Apply: Narcissists Shun Masks, Vaccines

    Narcissists' belief that it's 'all about them' can make them less likely to wear a mask or get vaccinated during the pandemic, a new study shows.

    Researchers analyzed data gathered from 1,100 U.S. adults in March 2021. They were asked about their mask use and vaccination views and behaviors, and they also completed assessments to measure their levels of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 16, 2022
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  • Science Doesn't Always Boost Sales, Study Finds

    Does science sell? Sometimes.

    Using science to sell chocolate chip cookies and other yummy products is likely to backfire, a new study shows, but touting scientific research behind more practical, everyday items -- such as body wash -- can be an effective marketing strategy.

    "People see science as cold, but competent. That doesn't pair well with products designed to be warm and plea...

    Fooled by Fake News: Does Age Matter?

    Older adults are no more likely to believe fake news than younger adults, with the exception of the very oldest, a new study finds.

    Falling for fake news can have significant physical, emotional and financial consequences, especially for older adults who may have their life savings or serious medical issues at stake, the researchers said.

    "We wanted to see if there was an age differ...

    You Let Your Cat Out - Where Does It Roam?

    Ever wonder where your cat wanders when you let it out? New research suggests your kitty most likely sticks close to home.

    Scientists used GPS (global positioning system) to track the movements of nearly 100 pet cats in a small town in Eastern Norway when they were outside. All of the cats lived in homes within about one square kilometer.

    The cats spent an average of 79% of their ou...

    Your Dog's Breed Has Little Influence on Behavior, Study Finds

    For the past couple of centuries, humans have been breeding dogs to meet specific physical characteristics - to make Golden Retrievers fluffy, to make Rottweilers muscular, or to make Chihuahuas tiny.

    Dog enthusiasts...

    Behavior Differences Led to High COVID Death Rate in U.S. South: Study

    Thousands of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. South could have been avoided if more people masked, social distanced, kept kids from school and made other behavioral changes to reduce the spread of the virus, researchers say.

    In other words, if they had acted more like folks up North.

    The study authors suggested that if the entire United States had followed the lead of the Northeast in t...

    Teens on TikTok: Fun, But Addictive and Maybe Harmful

    In the fall of 2021, TikTok announced a major milestone to coincide with its fifth anniversary: The amassing of roughly 1 billion global users, many of them young, turning to the app every month as a way to view, make and share bite-sized videos.

    But what exactly do those young users think of the app? Is it a boon to their self-esteem and creativity, or an addictive time-waster that crea...

    Hair of the Dog: A Quick, Painless Stress Test for Pooches

    The strange smells and sounds at an animal shelter can stress out even the most placid pup, and invasive tests to see if they need medicine to calm down only add to the anxiety.

    So there's some good news for Fido in new research out of the Netherlands.

    The study found that analyzing a single sample of a...

    Family Structure Influences Teen Delinquency

    The structure of teens' families influences their risk of delinquent behaviors such as shoplifting, graffiti or robbery, new research suggests.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed survey data gathered between 2016 and 2019 from more than 3,800 14- and 15-year-olds in Sweden. They used a statistical measure called incident rate ratio, or IRR, to compare groups.

    "This study shows...

    Body & Mind: Rehab Psychologists Help When Illness, Injuries Strike

    If you're recovering from a significant injury or illness, a rehabilitation therapist could be a big help in getting back to your normal daily life, according to experts.

    "You don't get a manual that comes with your injury that tells you how to navigate returning to your usual pattern of functioning," said Brigid Waldron-Perrine, a rehabilitation psychologist at Michigan Medicine-Universi...

    'Love Hormone' Turns Lions Into Placid Pussycats

    The "love hormone" oxytocin may be able to turn highly territorial lions into social sweethearts, researchers say.

    Lions typically guard their turf fiercely, which can be a problem when they're on reserves or in captivity and have less space to share than they do in the wild.

    The authors of a study published online ...

    Owners Can Play Big Role in Dogs' Problem Behaviors

    Chasing light shimmers reflected onto a wall. Obsessive licking or chewing. Compulsive barking and whining. Pacing or tail chasing.

    Nearly one in three pet dogs suffer from these ADHD-like repetitive behaviors - and researchers now suspect that an animal's home life could be t...

    Studies Relying on Brain Scans Are Often Unreliable, Analysis Shows

    Most brain studies that rely on MRI scans don't include enough people to provide trustworthy results, researchers say.

    These brain-wide association studies use MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to see how brain structure and function connect with personality, behavior, thinking, neurological conditions ...

    Pandemic Didn't Dent Americans' Optimism, Polls Find

    Despite the crushing challenges of navigating a worldwide pandemic during the past two years, Americans remain as optimistic as ever, a series of surveys shows.

    The surveys were conducted between 2008 and 2020, and included 2.7 million adults who were asked to use a 10-point scale to rank their current life satisfaction, with 10...

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