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U.S. Suicide Rates Rose in 2021, Reversing 2 Years of Decline

The suicide rate in the United States increased in 2021, following two years of decline, according to preliminary data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The number of suicides increased to 47,646 in 2021, up from 45,979 in 2020, according to researchers at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.

As a result, the U.S. suicide rate also increased ...

Could a Folic Acid Prescription Help Prevent Suicide?

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1 million Americans attempted suicide in 2020, and a new study is hinting at a potential way to reduce that risk: prescription folic acid.

The study, of more than 800,000 Americans in a health care database, found that when people were on prescription folic acid, their likelihood of being treated for

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 30, 2022
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  • Depression, PTSD Plague Flint Residents 5 Years After Water Crisis

    An unprecedented water crisis continues to take a heavy toll on the mental health of adults in Flint, Michigan, a large survey shows.

    Five years after the crisis, an estimated one in five — about 13,600 people — remained clinically depressed, the survey found. And about one in four — 1...

    Most Pregnancy-Related Deaths in U.S. Could Have Been Prevented

    More than four out of five pregnancy-related deaths in the United States could have been prevented, according to a new federal government report.

    The researchers examined data from

    Depression Affects Almost 1 in 10 Americans

    Nearly 10% of Americans suffer from depression, with the mood disorder increasing fastest among teens and young adults, a new study finds.

    Between 2015 and 2020, incidence of depression reached 9% among Americans 12 and older. Among teens and young adults, the depression rate stood at 17% in 2020, the researchers found.

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    Pot Use in Early Pregnancy Linked to Long-Term Mental Health Issues in Kids

    Using marijuana after the first weeks of pregnancy is linked to mental health issues in children that linger well into early adolescence, a new study shows.

    Exposure to cannabis after about five to six weeks of fetal development was associated with attention, social and behavioral problems, according to...

    New 988 Suicide Hotline Sees Increase in Calls for Help

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched a new suicide hotline using just the numbers 988 in July, and now new data shows calls climbed 45% compared to the same time last year.

    "Our nation's transition to 988 moves us closer to better serving the crisis care needs of people across America," HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra said in a

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 12, 2022
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  • Could You Spot the Signs of Suicide Risk?

    Recognizing the signs that someone is considering suicide could help save a life.

    "Emergency physicians see many people who are struggling silently with their mental health," said Dr. Gillian Schmitz, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians.

    "One...

    Stress Before COVID Infection Could Raise Odds for Long COVID

    As scientists around the world investigate why long COVID strikes some and not others, a new study finds that suffering psychological distress prior to COVID-19 infection may increase the chances of getting the lingering condition.

    Resea...

    Nearly 1 in 4 Young U.S. Adults Sought Mental Health Care During Pandemic

    The stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic may have led to a significant jump in the number of young American adults seeking help for mental health woes, new data shows.

    Between 2019 and 2021, the percentage of American adults overall who said they'd sought and received any mental health treatment over the ...

    With 'Chemical Imbalance' Theory in Doubt, What's Next for Depression Care?

    TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- For Mary Christ, the idea that depression is a chemical imbalance in the brain has always felt true to her personal experience.

    A former educator, Christ, 57, has taken antidepressants for much of her adult life. She experienced bouts of anxiety and panic attacks from...

    'Digital Self-Harm': When Teens Cyberbully Themselves

    Up to 9% of American teens say they've engaged in what's known as "digital self-harm" -- anonymously posting negative comments about themselves on social media.

    As is the case with acts of physical self-harm such as cutting, this "virtual" self-harm is associated with a higher risk for thinking about or attempting suicide, according to a startling

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 2, 2022
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  • Half of Moms of Children With Autism Have Depression

    While half of mothers of children with autism suffer symptoms of depression, a new study has discovered that did not raise the risk of behavioral problems for their kids.

    It was both a surprising and heartenin...

    'News Addiction' Is Common and Can Harm Your Mental Health

    From the COVID-19 pandemic and the spread of monkeypox to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, school shootings and devastating wildfires, there's been no lack of doom and gloom lately, and many folks are glued to the news.

    For more than 16% of people, however, compulsive news watching can be seriously problematic and is linked to a host of physical and

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 24, 2022
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  • Breakfast Might Be Good for a Child's Emotional Health, Too

    What your kids eat for breakfast and where they eat it could matter for their social and emotional health.

    That's the upshot of a new nationwide study from Spain that concluded that eating breakfast away from home was almost as detrimental as skipping the meal altogether. Researchers said thi...

    Family History of Mental Illness Ups Odds for Postpartum Depression

    Pregnant women with a family history of any mental health condition may be at increased risk of depression after giving birth, a new research review finds.

    In an analysis of 26 studies, researchers found that women with a family history of psychiatric diagnoses were at heightened risk of

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 22, 2022
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  • Hispanic Americans' Suicide Rates Are Rising

    Suicide is a major public health issue for all Americans, but new research suggests it is a particularly pressing problem for Hispanics.

    Between 2010 and 2020, the suicide rate among Hispanic adults increased by more than 70%, while the Hispanic population in the United States only grew by about 25%, the researcher...

    Pregnancy Can Be Anxious Time for Women With Epilepsy

    Pregnant women with epilepsy battle anxiety and depression more often than their peers who aren't pregnant or don't have epilepsy, a new study reveals.

    "The good news is we did not find that pregnant women with epilepsy were any more likely to have episodes of major depression than the other two groups," said st...

    Too Few Psychiatric Beds: Psychiatrists' Group Takes Aim at Ongoing Crisis

    Amid a stark shortage of psychiatric beds that only worsened for millions suffering from mental illnesses during the pandemic, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) is rolling out a new model that can help communities determine exactly how many beds they need.

    Having enough in-patient beds would cut down on overcrowding in emergency departments and early release from needed care, th...

    Veterans Often Reluctant to Admit Struggles With Sleep, Addictions

    A new study of U.S. military veterans reveals they are more comfortable getting help for physical ills than for mental health issues.

    "The majority of participants indicated they would be willing to seek treatment for both physical and mental health problems. However, they reported significantly greater willingness to seek treatment for physical than mental health conditions," said princi...

    Loneliness Can Be a Real Heartbreaker, Cardiac Experts Warn

    Social isolation and loneliness put people at a 30% higher risk of heart attack, stroke or death from either, a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    The statement also highlights the lack of data on interventions that could improve heart health in isolated or lonely people. It was published Aug. 4 in the

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 5, 2022
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  • Mental Health Issues Can Plague Families of Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

    Kids with type 1 diabetes and their closest relatives are more likely to experience mental health issues than people without the disease, Swedish researchers report.

    “Many clinicians assume intuitively that diabetes in a child negatively affects the mental health of both the patient and the family members,” said study co-author Agnieszka Butwicka, an assistant professor at the Karolin...

    More Than Half of Young U.S. Adults Have a Chronic Health Condition

    Obesity, depression, high blood pressure, asthma: These are just a few of the chronic health conditions that are now affecting almost 40 million Americans between the ages 18 and 34, new federal data shows.

    Overall, the 2019 data found that more than half of young adults (nearly 54%) now deal with at least on...

    8/9 -- Study Casts Doubt on 'Chemical Imbalance' Theory of Depression

    The notion that depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain has become widespread among the general public.

    But there's actually no hard evidence that the brain chemical

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • Could a Common Diabetes Drug Ease Bipolar Disorder?

    A half-century-old diabetes drug appears to help treat bipolar disorder by reversing patients' insulin resistance, according to a small-scale clinical trial.

    Bipolar patients who responded to the drug metformin experienced improvement in their

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • Most Post-Stroke Depression Still Goes Untreated

    While depression is common after a stroke, most stroke patients who need mental health care aren't getting the help they need, new research reveals.

    Roughly one in three stroke victims have depression. But about two-thirds of those received no mental health treatment. Patients who were older, men, Black people or Hispanic folks were even less likely to get help, the study found.

    “...

    Depression Can Follow Stroke, But It Often Precedes It, Too

    While many people suffer from depression after a stroke, a new study suggests depression often occurs beforehand and may be a warning sign.

    "The study underscores why doctors need to monitor for symptoms of depression long term in people who have had strokes," said study author...

    U.K. School Studies Find No Benefit of Mindfulness for Kids' Mental Health

    As rates of teenage anxiety and depression climb in the United States, parents and teachers are rushing to solve the mental health crisis.

    Some have proposed mindfulness training in schools as a therapeutic tool, but a review of studies out of the United Kingdom indicates it may be time to consid...

    Gardening Can Blossom Into Better Mental Health

    If you are feeling stressed and depressed, new research suggests that grabbing a trowel and getting your hands dirty may improve your mood.

    Researchers found that tending to plants can reap mental health benefits, even for first-time gardeners. The activity was linked to decreased stress, anxiety and depression in h...

    How Childhood Abuse Can Haunt the Senior Years

    Poor mental and physical health among older adults may trace back to childhood abuse, a Canadian study suggests.

    The study, published online July 7 in the journal Aging and Health Research, found that people who were physically abused during childhood were twice as likely ...

    Poll Finds Many Diabetes Caregivers Exhausted, Lacking Support

    Diane Kondyra knows a lot about the hidden dangers of diabetes.

    Both she and her husband have been diagnosed with the blood sugar disease, and her husband suffered one of its devastating complications in 2018 when he developed a staph infection that cost him part of his leg. Uncontrolled diabetes can restrict blood flow to the legs, making it more likely that simple cuts can turn int...

    What Drives Doctors to Take Their Own Lives

    Doctor burnout and suicide are a growing concern, a new study finds.

    "We often overlook the physical health of our health care workers, but poor health can lead to difficulty performing tasks at work, which then leads to job stress and mental health issues," said corresponding author Dr. Kristen Kim, a resident in psychiatry at UC San Diego Health.

    About 1 in 15 doctors experience s...

    Postpartum Depression Can Hit Both Mom & Dad, Sometimes at Same Time

    Most people have heard that women can experience depression after the birth of a child.

    But the condition is not limited to moms: New dads can experience depression in the months after their baby is born, by all accounts an enormous life change. This can even happen simultaneously, and with consequences for each of them and their new baby.

    To better understand these experiences, res...

    Youth Suicide Attempts Drop in U.S. States With Hate Crime Laws

    Hate crime laws that protect gay, lesbian and transgender people may have an unexpected benefit: fewer teen suicide attempts, among kids of all sexual orientations.

    That's the conclusion of a new study that looked at what happened in U.S. states that enacted hate crime laws with protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning individuals. It found that

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 23, 2022
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  • Pets Have Helped People With HIV Through Two Pandemics

    Pets have helped people weather both the HIV/AIDS and COVID-19 pandemics, a survey of long-term HIV/AIDS survivors shows.

    "The underlying question in our minds has always been: What role do pets play for people who are so isolated and suffering so much stigma?" said study leader Lynette Hart, a professor of veterinary medicine at the University of California, Davis.

    She and her coll...

    Obamacare May Have Helped Lower Suicide Rates

    Suicide rates are rising more slowly in states that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new study finds.

    "Suicide is a public health problem, and our findings indicate that increasing access to health care -- including mental health care -- by expanding Medicaid eligibility can play an imp...

    Isolation May Raise Odds for Dementia, Brain Study Suggests

    Staying connected to others may help protect your brain as you age, new research reveals.

    The study showed that social isolation - but not loneliness - can cause changes to ce...

    The 988 Mental Health Hotline Is Coming. Is America Ready?

    The mental health equivalent of 911 is about to launch across the United States, but a new study finds that many communities may not be prepared for it.

    Beginning July 16, a new 988 number will be available 24/7 for Americans dealing with a mental health crisis

    4 in 10 U.S. Adults Who Need Mental Health Care Can't Get It: Survey

    There is a "staggering" gap between the number of Americans who need care for anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions and those who can actually get it, a new survey shows.

    In all, 42% of U.S. adults who needed care in the previous 12 months did not get it because of costs and other barriers, according to the online survey from the National Council for Mental Wellbeing. Nea...

    COVID Might Raise Odds for Psychiatric Disorders Later: Study

    People who've been through a bout of COVID may be more vulnerable to mental health disorders in the months following their infection, a new study warns.

    Researchers analyzed data on more than 46,000 people in the United States who tested positive for COVID-19 and an equal number of people with other types of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 8, 2022
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  • Study Uncovers Strong Links Between Depression and Crohn's, Colitis

    New research points to a compelling interplay between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression.

    IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to the physical pain that these illnesses c...

    Intentional Overdoses Rise Among U.S. Kids, Teens

    A growing number of U.S. kids are attempting suicide by medication overdose - with the biggest increase seen among preteens, a recent study shows.

    Researchers found that between 2015 and 2020, there was a 27% increase in overdose suicide or attempted suicide among U.S. children and teenagers. While teens accounted for most of those incidents, it was 10- to 12-year-olds who showed the bigg...

    Team Sports: Good for Kids' Minds, Too

    Kids who play team sports may win some mental health benefits, but the same may not hold true for those in solo sports, a large, new study suggests.

    A number of previous studies have linked team sports to better mental well-being for children and teenagers, and the new...

    Depression in Pregnancy Tied to Behavior Issues in Kids

    Children whose mothers had rising levels of depression during pregnancy appear to have an increased risk of behavioral problems, researchers say.

    "Our findings suggest that increases in mother's symptoms of depression from preconception to postpartum contribute to children's lower attention and behavioral control, which can raise the risk of problems across the life span," said study lead...

    Pandemic Has U.S. Hospitals Overwhelmed With Teens in Mental Crisis

    The COVID-19 pandemic and the isolation it imposed took a dramatic toll on kids' mental health, increasing the demand for services in an already overburdened system.

    As a result, many kids found themselves being "boarded" in emergency departments as they awaited care, according to a new study conducted at Boston Children's Hospital. The average wait was nearly five days without specialize...

    Various Mental Illnesses Share Same Genes: Study

    Many people who get a diagnosis for one mental illness may find they have additional psychiatric conditions, and new genetic research offers an explanation why.

    A number of mental illnesses share genetic similarities, researchers found. This discovery helps explain why multiple conditions are common among people with psychiatric disorders, the investigators pointed out in a new study.

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    Nurses Key to Spotting Postpartum Depression in New Moms

    Nurses can be trained to detect postpartum depression in new mothers and could be crucial in spotting the condition early, researchers report.

    Postpartum depression affects about 15% of new moms and can cause persistent sadness, fatigue, feelings of hopelessness and wort...

    Depression, Anxiety Hit Minorities Hardest During Pandemic

    Americans' rates of depression and anxiety spiked during the first year of the pandemic, but the increases were much more pronounced among Black, Hispanic and Asian people than among white people, new research shows.

    From April 2020 to April 2021, the overall incidence of depression or

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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  • Week Off Social Media Boosts Mental Health: Study

    It's no secret that too much social media can be bad for one's mental health. Now, research suggests that taking even a brief break from TikTok, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can ease symptoms of depression and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 11, 2022
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  • It's Getting Tougher to Find Spanish-Language Mental Health Services in U.S.

    Mental health has become a hot topic during the pandemic, but some groups have been burdened by having too few services available even before the challenges of these past two years.

    A new study found that while the Hispanic population in the United States grew by almost 5% between 2014 and 2019, Spanish-language mental health services dropped by about 18% during that same time.

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