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1 in 3 U.S. Public Health Workers Feels Threatened During Pandemic

One-third of public health workers have endured threats, anger and aggression from the public during the pandemic, and that has come at a steep cost to their mental health, a new study finds.

“The negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on workers have been documented and the research on psychological impacts is building,” said lead study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 25, 2023
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  • Many Patients Aren't Getting Best Quality Lung Cancer Surgery: Study

    A surgeon's skill has a direct impact on whether a patient will survive early-stage lung cancer.

    Unfortunately, many surgeons are failing to follow a playbook that increase the odds of a successful outcome, a new study argues.

    The quality of surgery for lung cancer varies widely across the United States, and patients whose procedures fall short of treatment guidelines suffer signifi...

    Patients Give High Ratings to Pre-Surgery Telemedicine Consultations

    Despite distance and occasional technical glitches, a new study finds that most patients like seeing a surgeon for the first time via video.

    The study was published Jan. 19 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

    "We see patients ...

    In Study, Reminder Letters Helped Doctors Make Safer Choices Prescribing Opioids

    Could a simple letter prompt doctors to prescribe opioids more safely?

    Yes, claims new research that found reminding doctors to check a prescription database before doling out opioids increased their engagement with the program, having the potential to create more informed prescribing.

    The study enrolled clinicians in Minnesota who prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines or gabapent...

    Letting Doctors Know a Patient Has Overdosed Might Curb Opioid Overprescribing

    One low-cost intervention could make a difference in America's epidemic of opioid overdoses, a new study suggests.

    When health care providers were notified that one of their patients had died from an overdose, they wrote fewer opioid prescriptions for up to a year later.

    The University of Southern California (USC) study built upon earlier findings that letters like these could reduc...

    Emergency Care Vs. Urgent Care: What's the Difference?

    If you’re sick or have been injured, you might not know whether the emergency room or urgent care is the right place to be treated.

    The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) offers some general advice, so you don’t have to wonder where to go when immediate medical attention is needed.

    “The emergency department is the best option for concerning symptoms, severe illnes...

    Is Your Specialist Friends With Your Primary Care Doctor? You May Get Better Care

    Patients might be happier with their care when their physician trained with the specialist they're referred to, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that when patients saw a specialist, they generally gave better ratings to their care if that doctor had gone to medical school with their primary care provider. On the whole, they said those specialists take more time to talk with them, g...

    America's Doctors Offer Up Healthy Resolutions for 2023

    It's that time of year again, when people gather up their best intentions for living a healthier life and make New Year's resolutions.

    Luckily, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some suggestions on which pledges pack the most punch.

    Start by being more physically active. Adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity or 75 minutes a week of vig...

    Doctors & Their Families Less Likely to Follow Medical Guidelines Than Others

    Doctors are notorious for criticizing patients who don't take medications as prescribed.

    But physicians and their families are themselves less likely than everyone else to comply with medication guidelines, a new, large-scale study has found.

    People tend to adhere to medication guidelines about 54% of the time, while doctors and their families lag about 4 percentage points behind th...

    America Facing Shortage of Infectious Disease Doctors

    The COVID-19 pandemic. Dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The current waves of influenza and RSV ripping through schools and workplaces.

    America has had ample examples in recent years of the importance of infectious disease doctors.

    Despite this, the United States is facing a shortage of doctors choosing to specialize in infectious disease, according to the Infectious Diseases...

    'How Can I Prevent Heart Disease?' Docs Give Different Answers to Men, Women

    Doctors give men and women different advice to head off heart disease, even though guidelines for both are the same.

    Men were 20% more likely to be prescribed statins to lower blood levels of bad cholesterol compared with women, a new study found.

    Women, meanwhile, were 27% more likely to be advised to lose weight or reduce their salt intake, and 38% more likely to receive recommen...

    'Tumor Progressing,' 'Positive Findings': Patients Often Confused by Medical Jargon

    If you've ever left a medical appointment confused, it's probably not you: A new study finds that the medical jargon doctors use can be completely misunderstood by patients.

    Common medical lingo that makes perfect sense to doctors often gets lost in translation when conveyed to laypeople, the new research found. It turns out that many people mistakenly believe it's good news if a tum...

    The 'Great Resignation' Is Taking a Toll on U.S. Health Care

    The nationwide shortage of health care professionals -- a so-called "Great Resignation" of providers -- is impacting patient care in ways large and small, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll shows.

    One in four Americans (25%) have noticed or personally experienced the impact of staffing shortages in health care, second only to staff shortages in the retail sector (35%), the poll found.

    Telemedicine's Popularity Has Risen During Pandemic

    Telemedicine became widespread during the pandemic, and that may have shifted patient views about using technology as way to communicate with their doctors, a new study suggests.

    Certain groups, including Black patients and those with lower education levels, became especially more apt to use it.

    "Our findings suggest that more Americans are becoming comfortable with telehealth and u...

    CDC Issues New Guidance on Prescribed Opioids for Pain

    THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2022 -- U.S. doctors prescribing opioids for pain relief now have a new -- and more nuanced -- set of guidelines from the federal government.

    Issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, the new recommendations incorporate new science developed since the last set of guidelines were released in 2016, at the height of the country's opioid epid...

    Many Urban Seniors Rely on 'Broken' City Transit to Get to Medical Appointments

    More than 700,000 older Americans rely on public transportation to get to and from their medical appointments.

    That's roughly 1 in 10 seniors who live in cities.

    But when individuals were frail, or used a wheelchair, or sidewalks along their route were damaged, they were less likely to take the subway or bus, pointing to a need for improvement, according to a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 27, 2022
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  • As Young Doctors' Work Hours Rise, So Do Odds for Depression

    Training to become a doctor can be grueling, and now a new study finds a direct correlation between longer work hours and depression symptoms in first-year residents.

    Medical residency -- the training that new doctors undergo at hospitals or clinics -- is infamous for its

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 24, 2022
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  • Most Docs Want Telehealth for Opioid Abuse Treatment to Stick Around

    Many doctors who used telehealth to treat patients with opioid addiction because of the COVID-19 pandemic would like to make it a permanent part of their practice.

    A new study from Yale School of Public Health surveyed more than 1,100 physicians who treated opioid-use disorder patients via telehealth.

    Researchers found that 6 out of every 7 physicians were in favor of making this ...

    Medical Groups Urge Protections for Health Workers Providing Gender-Affirming Care

    Three leading medical groups have asked the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate growing threats to doctors, hospitals and families providing and seeking gender-affirming care.

    In a letter to U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American Medical Association (AMA) and Children's Hospital Association (CHA) called for swift action to investiga...

    'I'm Not the Doctor for You': Disabled Americans Face Discrimination Seeking Care

    Over 30 years since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), some doctors harbor biases toward people with disabilities, and even actively avoid accepting them as patients, a new study finds.

    In focus group discussions with about two dozen U.S. doctors, researchers found that many said they lacked the knowledge and skill to care for patients with disabilities. Even basic ...

    U.S. Will Spend $266 Million to Bolster Public Health Programs

    The U.S. government will invest $266 million to shore up the community and public health workforce using American Rescue Plan funding.

    About $225.5 million will go to 83 recipients to support training and apprenticeship for 13,000 new community health workers, CNN reported before Friday's announcement...

    Does Your Surgeon's Gender Matter?

    Folks having surgery have lots of things to worry about as they go under the knife, but the gender of their surgeon isn't one of them, a new study finds.

    There's no difference in rates of death or complications between male and female surgeons, Japanese data shows.

    And that's even though in Japan female surgeons are more likely to be assigned high-risk patients than male surgeons, r...

    America's ER Docs Alarmed by Rising Violence From Patients

    The stories grabbed headlines during the pandemic: Violent episodes in U.S. emergency rooms where patients attacked doctors.

    Now, a new poll shows just how widespread the problem has become: Two-thirds of emergency physicians reported being assaulted in t...

    Telemedicine Diagnoses Match Those of In-Person Doctor Visits Most of the Time

    With online medical visits growing in popularity, a new study offers some reassurance: Diagnoses made via video are usually on the money.

    Mayo Clinic researchers found that of preliminary diagnoses made during video appointments at their centers, 87% were later confirmed during in-person visits.

    The caveat is, the accuracy varied somewhat according to the type of medical condition: ...

    Leading U.S. Pediatricians' Group Issues Guidelines to Prevent Patient Abuse

    Recent years have seen several high-profile cases of doctors sexually abusing young patients. Now the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is issuing new recommendations aimed at prevention.

    Medical visits are usually a safe place for children and teenagers, but when abuse does happen, it is an egregious violation.

    One reason, the AAP says, is because parents and kids trust that hea...

    Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass Public Health Officials

    U.S. health officials are in the crosshairs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, facing threats and harassment from the public they serve.

    And a growing percentage of U.S. adults are fine with that, according to a new Cornell University study.

    Analysis of public opinion ...

    9 in 10 Americans Want Their Health Info Kept Private

    More than 9 in 10 Americans believe that medical privacy is a right and their health data shouldn't be for sale, a new survey from the American Medical Association shows.

    The

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • Alternative Medicine Popular Among Seniors, But Most Don't Tell Their Doctors About It

    Lots of older folks are turning to alternative medicine to help them with the pains of aging -- but they don't necessarily think that's any of their doctor's business.

    About 40% of older adults use at least one alternative medicine practice to help w...

    Overworked Anesthesiologists Can Put Surgical Patients at Risk

    Harried, overworked anesthesiologists could be raising hospital patients' risk of death and complications, a new study reports.

    It's not uncommon to have one anesthesiologist directing the anesthesia care for multiple surgeries at the same time, overseeing the work of lower-ranking anesthesia clinicians assi...

    Ob/Gyn Tests Stay Virtual Due to Fears Around COVID, Abortion Ruling

    In light of the Supreme Court's recent ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, many ob/gyns around the country are welcoming a change that allows them to continue taking accreditation exams virtually.

    The tests, typically hosted in Texas, had been held virtually during the pandemic but there had been plans ...

    Minority Students More Likely to Leave Medical School: Study

    Medical schools are doing a better job of recruiting minority students, but they still struggle to keep those would-be doctors on...

    'Medical Gaslighting': Are You a Victim?

    FRIDAY, July 15, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- As a teenager, April Summerford suffered from extremely painful periods that made her suspect something was wrong with her body.

    Summerford didn't know it, but she had

    Key Players in Keeping Kids Safe From Guns: Pediatricians

    Pediatricians may become the trusted middle men between gun owners and non-gun owners when it comes to talks about gun safety, a new study shows.

    University of Pennsylvania researchers found parents were more open to politically sensitive discussions about gun locks and other gun safety measures whe...

    When Hospital Patient & Doctor Speak Same Language, Outcomes Improve

    It's already hard enough to understand all your doctor's technical talk -- now imagine speaking a whole other language on top of that.

    Hospital patients who don't speak the same language as their doctor get worse care and are more likely to die, a new Canadian study shows.

    Research done in Ontario -- a linguistica...

    What Drives Doctors to Take Their Own Lives

    Doctor burnout and suicide are a growing concern, a new study finds.

    "We often overlook the physical health of our health care workers, but poor health can lead to difficulty performing tasks at work, which then leads to job stress and mental health issues," said corresponding author Dr. Kristen Kim, a resident in psychiatry at UC San Diego Health.

    About 1 in 15 doctors experience s...

    Your Doctor's Gender, Race May Bias Your Treatment Outcome

    Deep-rooted bias may affect the way white patients physically respond to medical care provided by physicians of differing race or gender.

    Researchers assessed treatment reactions of nearly 200 white patients after they were randomly assigned to receive care from a male or female doctor who was either Black, white or Asian.

    White patients appeared to improve faster when treated by a...

    Ob-Gyns Call Bans on Abortion Devastating for Women's Health

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn a woman's right to have an abortion marks a "very dark day in health care" that will leave patients at risk and doctors afraid to act, leaders of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) said Friday.

    "It is a dark day indeed for t...

    Telemedicine Could Really Help People Battling Advanced Cancers

    As a bill that would expand Medicare coverage for telehealth services makes its way through the U.S. Senate, a new study of people with advanced cancer suggests the practice could improve the lives of patients.

    The use of telehealth skyrocketed during the pandemic: A U.S. Health and Human Services ...

    Is Telemedicine Closing the 'Race Gap' in Primary Care?

    Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to primary care between Black and non-Black Americans.

    The use of telemedicine boomed during the pandemic, so University ...

    1 in 4 Hospital Physicians 'Mistreated' by Patients, Visitors

    Nearly 1 in 4 hospital doctors are mistreated at work by patients, visitors and other doctors, and female doctors are nearly two times more likely than male doctors to face this abuse, a new study reveals.

    "All members of the health care team share the r...

    Bans on Affirmative Action Led to Fewer Black, Hispanic Doctors

    State bans on affirmative action have prompted a precipitous decline in the number of U.S. medical students from racial/ethnic minority groups, a new study finds.

    "We know that a more diverse physician workforce leads to better care for racial- and ethnic-minority patients," said lead researcher Dr. Dan Ly, a...

    Fewer U.S. Doctors Will Get Trained in Abortion if Roe v. Wade Overturned

    There could be far fewer U.S. doctors trained to provide an abortion if Roe v. Wade is overturned by the Supreme Court in a decision that is expected by the end of June, researchers report.

    That's because nearly 45% of 286 obstetrics and gynecology residency programs across the United States are in the 26 states certain or likely to ban abortion if the court overturns

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 2, 2022
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  • Doctors Devise Safer Alternative to Opioids During, After Surgeries

    It's been slightly more than a year since Jonathan Akindle, 23, underwent weight-loss surgery, and so far, so good.

    He is now down 130 pounds, and he was able to get through gastric sleeve surgery and recovery without taking any opioids for pain.

    "The pain right after...

    AI May Help Spot Relapse Risk in Alcoholics

    Artificial intelligence (AI) may be able to identify alcoholics at risk of relapsing after treatment, researchers say.

    Patients often return to heavy drinking during and after treatment, and may require multiple tries before they can achieve long-term abstinence from

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2022
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  • Health Care Workers Were At Highest COVID Risk in Workplace

    U.S. health care workers were most likely to be infected with COVID-19 at work during the pandemic's first year, according to a new study that challenges previous research suggesting their risk was highest off the job.

    Researchers said their findings could help guide efforts to better protect ...

    U.S. Medical Schools' Faculty Still Lack Diversity: Study

    U.S. medical schools are not keeping pace with a nation that is more racially and ethnically diverse every day, a new study reports.

    The schools' clinical faculty and leadership are not as diverse as the communities around them, though ...

    As Pandemic Evolved, U.S. Hospitals Learned Quickly How to Care for Patients

    While hospitals and clinics are known for being slow to turn new evidence into actual practice, they picked up the pace during the pandemic.

    A research team led by scientists from Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and the University of California, San Francisco, collected data from more than 50 academic medical centers across the United States, finding that hospitals overcame ba...

    New Way to Blast Kidney Stones Can Be Done in Doctor's Office

    A noninvasive ultrasound technique is capable of quickly pulverizing kidney stones, an early study shows - in what researchers call a first step toward a simpler, anesthesia-free treatment for the painful problem.

    The study reports on the first 19 patients who've had kidney stones treated with the ultrasound "bursts." So far, it's been able to completely, or nearly completely, break up st...

    Ultrasounds, Exams Unnecessary Before Receiving Abortion Pill: Study

    Women can safely use abortion pills without first getting ultrasound scans, or having an in-person medical appointment at all, a new study confirms.

    For more than 20 years, U.S. women have had access to medication abortions for ending early pregnancies, using the drugs mifepristone and misoprostol. But for most of that time, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration required them to have an i...

    U.S. Health Officials Faced Widespread Harassment During Pandemic

    Harassment of U.S. public health officials and departments was rampant during the COVID-19 pandemic and led some officials to quit, researchers say.

    Their analysis of survey responses from 583 local health departments nationwide found 57% of them reported nearly 1,500 incidents of harassment that ...

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