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23 Mar

Animal Study of Male Birth Control Pill Shows Promise

A new, non-hormonal male birth control pill is highly effective in mice and could begin human trials in 2022, researchers say.

Health News Results - 53

9 in 10 Americans Want Their Health Info Kept Private

More than 9 in 10 Americans believe that medical privacy is a right and their health data shouldn't be for sale, a new survey from the American Medical Association shows.

The

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • Telehealth, Phone Visits a Lifesaver for Veterans Addicted to Opioids

    There are many obstacles to opioid addiction treatment, but a new study shows one that one outgrowth of the COVID pandemic -- telehealth -- is enabling more U.S. veterans to get help.

    Researchers examined care given to vets before and after a transition to telehealth visits in early 2020 for treatment of their opioid use disorder. Telehealth for patients receiving the prescription drug

    Telehealth Visits Can Boost Prenatal, Maternal Care

    Seeing their doctors via telehealth instead of in person during the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have been as good, and sometimes even better, for pregnant women and new moms.

    Researchers from Oregon Health & Science University reviewed 28 randomized clinical trials and 14 observational studies that included more than 44,000 women. The goal was to determine the effectiveness and any harms...

    How Much Will That Hip Replacement Cost? Many Hospitals Still Aren't Saying

    Since January 2021, hospitals have been required to list online the prices for 300 common medical services, but new research has found that only 32% of hospitals have been fully compliant when it comes to knee and hip replacements.

    "Although pricing informat...

    U.S. Spends More on Cancer Than Any Other Country. Why Are Survival Rates Low?

    The United States spends far more on cancer care than other wealthy nations, but it's not seeing a return on that investment in terms of lives saved, a new study shows.

    Compared with the average high-income country, researchers found the U.S. spends twice as much on cancer care -- more tha...

    Hispanics Wait Half-Hour Longer in ER When Chest Pain Strikes

    When Hispanic Americans arrive in the emergency room with chest pain, they have to wait longer for care than other people with the same symptoms, a preliminary study finds.

    Chest pain, a potential sign of heart attack, is one of the leading reasons people end up in an ER. But the new findings suggest that Hispanic patients may face unnecessary delays in either receiving care, being admitt...

    Medicare Advantage Plans Often Deny Coverage for Eligible, Necessary Care: Report

    Coverage for eligible, necessary care is denied each year to tens of thousands of seniors with private Medicare Advantage plans, U.S. federal investigators say.

    In a report released Thursday, the team from the inspector general's office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Medicare needs ...

    Who Are the New 'Patient Influencers' on Social Media?

    Disability activist Gem Hubbard regularly shares her insights about life in a wheelchair with more than 75,000 Instagram followers, under the handle @wheelsnoheels_, and her YouTube videos boast more than 3.7 million hits.

    Hubbard, who hails from the U.K., is "increasingly known internationally for her work in furthering the horizons of people with and without disabilities,"

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2022
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  • Major Credit Agencies Will Drop Most Medical Debt From Reports

    Most medical debt will be dropped from Americans' credit reports as of this summer, the top three credit reporting agencies said Friday.

    The announcement by Equifax, Experian and TransUnion comes as medical bills have become the largest source of personal debt in the United States, ...

    Could Russian Hackers Cripple U.S. Health Care Systems?

    FRIDAY, March 11, 2022 -- Sick people seeking lifesaving care in the United States could fall victim to a hidden part of Russia's war on Ukraine -- vicious cyberattacks aimed at sowing disruption, confusion and chaos as ground forces advance.

    Cybersecurity experts warn that attacks launched against Ukrainian institutions have the potential to spill over into America's health care systems,...

    Overworked, Underpaid: Report Finds Wages Lag for U.S. Health Care Workers

    Though they're on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. health care workers' paychecks don't always adequately reward those efforts.

    Wages for health care workers actually rose less than the average across all U.S. employment sectors during the first and second years of the pandemic, according to a

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  • March 2, 2022
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  • Alexa Will Soon Put Users in Touch With Telehealth Doctors

    Alexa can already play your favorite song or tell you whether it is going to rain, but soon you may also be able to tell the popular voice assistant to contact a doctor for health issues.

    The service from Amazon and telemedicine provider Teladoc Health will be available around the clock on Amazon's Echo devices, the Associat...

    Many Doctors Uninformed on Rights of Disabled Patients

    More than 30 years after passage of the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), many doctors still don't know how to provide accessible care, a new study finds.

    "Despite the fact people with disabilities comprise 25% of the population, they often confront barriers to basic health care services such as physical examinations, weight measurement and effective communication with their...

    Months After New Rule, More Than Half of U.S. Hospitals Still Don't Disclose Prices Online

    Big "surprise" medical bills may still be a problem for Americans.

    According to a new study, more than half of U.S. hospitals haven't complied with recent regulations requiring that they disclose their prices online for all services, to help prevent unexpected bills for patients.

    About 55% of hospitals have yet to comply with the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 13, 2021
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  • 1 in 3 U.S. Children Lack Adequate Health Insurance

    Though they live in one of the world's richest nations, a growing number of young Americans are without ample health insurance.

    A new study reports that 34% of U.S. kids age 17 and under were "...

    Rural Hospitals' ERs Just as Effective as Urban Ones: Study

    If you live the country life, new research brings a reassuring finding: Your chances of surviving a heart attack, stroke or other potentially life-threatening medical emergency at a rural emergency department are similar to odds at a city ER in the United States.

    Researchers analyzed more than 470,000 outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries treated at rural and urban ERs between 2011 and 20...

    Biden Plan Will Spend $1.5 Billion to Boost Health Worker Supply

    Vice President Kamala Harris announced Monday that the Biden administration will spend $1.5 billion to tackle a health care worker shortage in underserved communities.

    The money from the COVID-19 recovery program, called the American Rescue Plan, and other sources will go to three federal programs that provide scholarships and loan repayments for health care students and workers if they a...

    Almost 1 in 3 U.S. Seniors Now Sees at Least 5 Doctors Per Year

    Nearly one-third of older U.S. adults visit at least five different doctors each year -- reflecting the growing role of specialists in Americans' health care, a new study finds.

    Over the past 20 years, Americans on Medicare have been increasingly seeing specialists, researchers found, with almost no change in visits with their primary care doctor.

    On average, beneficiaries saw a 34%...

    Your Free Cancer Screen Shows Trouble: What If You Can't Afford the Follow-Up?

    Just over a decade ago, the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) made many common cancer screenings free. But a pair of new studies caution that when those free tests turn up signs of trouble, important follow-up tests may be too pricey for some patients.

    The bigger concern: Some patients may forgo these expensive tests, even when they may prove lifesaving.

    "With t...

    Medical Paperwork: So Bad Some Folks Skip Care

    Getting prior authorizations to see a specialist, dealing with errors on medical bills and even scheduling appointments can be a big hassle.

    That's clear to anyone who has spent time on the phone handling issues with insurance companies or doctors' offices.

    For some patients, in fact, it's a hurdle that's caused them to delay or even forgo needed medical care.

    "It is the thing...

    Most Older Americans Believe Health Care Workers Should Be Vaccinated: Poll

    Eight in 10 older Americans think health care workers should be vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a new poll.

    Among 50- to 80-year-olds, 61% of respondents said the vaccine should be required for all health care workers. Another 19% said vaccination should probably be required. The remaining 20% oppose mandatory vaccination, the findings showed.

    The results are from a nation...

    Health Savings Accounts Used Least by People Who Need Them Most: Poll

    Tax-free health savings accounts can make it easier for Americans to pay for future health expenses, but most older adults aren't using them.

    A new poll by Michigan Medicine-University of Michigan found that while nearly 1 in 5 people weren't confident that they could afford their health costs, only about 12% of people had a flexible spending account (FSA). And just 45% of people who qual...

    Father and Son Caught Up in Severe Blood Shortage Hitting U.S. Hospitals

    As June 28 approached, David Beverley had been "psyching himself up" for major surgery, as a lifesaving liver donor for his ailing 60-year-old father, Peter.

    "But then they called us, literally the day before, and told us: 'We've got to stop this. We don't have any blood.'" the 32-year-old Utah resident said.

    That's the moment when both David and Peter came into the crosshairs ...

    When Deductibles Rise, More Diabetes Patients Skip Their Meds

    As many Americans know, today's health insurance plans often come with high deductibles. Those out-of-pocket costs could cause harm: New research shows that 20% of people who have diabetes and high-deductible health plans regularly skip their medications.

    Not keeping up with your diabetes medications comes with the potential risk of an emergency room visit or a hospitalization.

    Major Medical Groups Call for Mandatory COVID Vaccination for Health Workers

    All health care workers should be required to be vaccinated against COVID-19, dozens of major U.S. medical groups said in a joint statement released Monday.

    "Due to the recent COVID-19 surge and the availability of safe and effective vaccines, our health care organizations and societies advocate that all health care and long-term care employers require their workers to receive the COVID-1...

    Cancer Survivors Fared Better Financially After Obamacare

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has eased financial struggles for younger adult cancer survivors, a new study finds.

    University of Michigan researchers analyzed data from more than 20,000 participants in the National Health Interview Survey and found that cancer survivors ages 18 to 64 were less likely to delay treatments and had less difficulty paying for medications or dental care from 20...

    1 in 3 Caregivers for Elderly May Be Untrained, Unscreened

    A new report raises questions about the training and qualifications of many caregivers for the elderly across the United States.

    The study by the RAND Corporation, a nonprofit research organization, found that nearly a third of Americans who arranged for paid care of a frail elderly adult or person with dementia hired someone from outside of a regulated agency.

    Known as "gray market...

    How Secure Is Your Health or Fitness App?

    Your health and fitness apps may have privacy issues that put your personal information at risk, researchers warn.

    "This analysis found serious problems with privacy and inconsistent privacy practices in mHealth [mobile health] apps. Clinicians should be aware of these and articulate them to patients when determining the benefits and risks," lead study author Muhammad Ikram and his co-aut...

    Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

    The vast majority of editors at leading medical journals are white - with few of those influential spots going to Black or Hispanic professionals, a new study finds.

    The study comes on the heels of a controversy that prompted the resignation of the editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    It all started in February when Dr. Ed Livingston, a JA...

    Medicare's Penalties for Poor-Quality Dialysis Centers Aren't Helping: Study

    Dialysis centers hit with financial penalties for poor performance don't tend to improve afterward, calling into question a set of U.S. federal programs intended to improve health care nationwide, a new report says.

    Dialysis centers face up to a 2% reduction in their annual Medicare reimbursements if they get a low score on a set of quality measures designed by the U.S. Centers for Medica...

    After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

    Reacting to recent controversy, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Thursday a series of steps it will take to promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the medical society and its network of 12 influential journals.

    Dr. Howard Bauchner, editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), is stepping down at the end of June, forced out ov...

    JAMA Journals' Editor-in-Chief Steps Down After Deputy's Racism Comments

    Because of controversial statements about racism made by a staff member, the editor-in-chief of JAMA and JAMA Network will step down on June 30, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Tuesday.

    Dr. Howard Bauchner, JAMA's chief since 2011, has been on administrative leave due to a JAMA podcast and tweet about structural racism in medicine that...

    Many Pre-Surgery Tests Are Useless, So Why Are Hospitals Still Using Them?

    Patients facing relatively simple outpatient surgeries are nonetheless being told to undergo a number of preoperative tests that just aren't necessary, a new study reports.

    More than half of a group of patients facing low-risk outpatient surgery received one or more tests -- blood work, urinalysis, an electrocardiogram (EKG), a chest X-ray -- prior to their operation.

    One-third of p...

    It's Still Tough to Find Prices on Most U.S. Hospital Websites

    U.S. hospitals have been required to make their prices public since 2019, but 18 months into the rule more than half weren't doing it, a new study finds.

    In 2018, the Trump administration issued a rule requiring hospitals to publish their "chargemasters" on their websites. A chargemaster is a rundown of a hospital's services, along with their list prices - something akin to the manufactur...

    Nurses Are Dying From Suicide at Higher Rates

    Before the pandemic began, suicide risk was twice as high among female nurses compared with American women as a whole, a new study warns.

    Even within the health care community itself, female nurses were found to be roughly 70% more likely to die by suicide than female doctors.

    Why? Study author Matthew Davis said that for now, "We don't know for certain what forces are directly resp...

    4 in 10 Adults Over 50 Consult Online Reviews When Picking a Doctor

    Finding a new doctor can be a daunting task. For help, many older adults turn to online reviews, a new study finds.

    In fact, many people rate online reviews as highly as they would a recommendation from friends and family when picking a doctor, the new research found.

    "Doctors and policymakers should know that many older adults are viewing and valuing online ratings and reviews when...

    Strain of COVID Care Has Many Health Professionals Looking for an Exit

    After the pandemic, the next great health care challenge in the United States could be retaining highly trained doctors, nurses and scientists, a new study warns.

    Up to one in five employees at an academic medical institution are considering leaving their professions because of the strains of coping with the pandemic, according to the researchers.

    "It's sobering to learn that, d...

    Can Fitbits Be a Dieter's Best Friend?

    Looking to shed some of those pandemic pounds? A new analysis says wearables like Fitbit and Apple Watch can help people slim down.

    The researchers examined studies involving commercial health wearables and adults who were overweight/obese or had a chronic health condition.

    After daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for a period between a month and a year, participants lost ...

    Pandemic Is Hitting Hospitals Hard, Including Their Bottom Line

    U.S. hospitals are expected to lose billions again in 2021, leaving them in dire financial shape as the COVID-19 pandemic guts the industry for a second year.

    Hospitals could lose $53 billion to $122 billion in revenue in 2021, between 4% and 10% of their total revenue, according to an analysis prepared by consulting firm Kaufman Hall & Associates for the American Hospital Association.

    Pandemic Taking Big Mental Health Toll on Health Care Workers

    Frontline health care workers have been through tremendous challenges this past year while treating COVID-19 patients throughout the world.

    It should come as no surprise that many are having trouble emotionally.

    A new study looked at the impact of the pandemic on sleep and mental health among the general population and health care workers by analyzing 55 studies involving nearly 190...

    Bias More Likely in Medical Journals That Accept Reprint Fees: Study

    There is a longstanding fear in the scientific community that pharmaceutical companies could sway the research published in medical journals by paying them for advertising, but a new study reveals that advertising might not be the problem.

    "All the available literature suggests that ad revenue should be the real concern, but that's not what we found," said study author S. Scott Graham...

    Pandemic Has Half of U.S. Hospitals Operating at a Loss: Report

    The COVID-19 pandemic has America's hospitals on the fiscal ropes, with many facing financial ruin without continued aid from the federal government, a new report predicts.

    Average hospital margins across the nation could sink to −7% in the second half of 2020 without further help, with half of all hospitals potentially operating in the red, the American Hospital Association...

    Americans Lag Behind Brits When It Comes to Health

    Health care in the United States is often touted as the best in the world, but Americans seem to be in worse health than their British peers, a new study shows.

    Even the richest Americans in their 50s and early 60s had higher rates of diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis and mental health problems than their wealthy British counterparts.

    Those who were in the top 10%...

    Pandemic Hits Primary Care Practices Hard Across the U.S.: Study

    Huge declines in patient visits during the coronavirus pandemic have slashed U.S. primary care doctors' revenues, a new study finds.

    As a result of decreases in office visits and fees for services from March to May during the pandemic, a full-time primary care physician will lose an average of more than $65,000 in revenue in 2020.

    Overall, primary care practices nationwide s...

    Don't Believe All the 'Science' on CBD Products

    Cannabidiol -- commonly known as CBD -- might not be all it is touted to be, new research suggests.

    Instead, existing evidence on the potential benefits of the compound found in marijuana and hemp has often been backed by industry, scientists said.

    The researchers found that of 99 human CBD studies done since 2014, about 62% had some conflict of interest -- including in...

    Independent Pharmacies Are Closing Down Across the U.S.

    One in eight U.S. pharmacies closed in recent years, with independent pharmacies in cities taking the hardest hit, a new study shows.

    Specifically, 9,654 pharmacies closed from 2009 to 2015. Independent pharmacies in both cities and rural areas were three times more likely to close than chain pharmacies.

    About one in four pharmacies in urban, low-income neighborhoods closed,...

    OxyContin Maker Purdue Offering Up to $12 Billion to Settle Opioid Claims

    Purdue Pharma, the drug giant many have blamed for the ongoing U.S. opioid abuse crisis, has offered $10 billion to $12 billion to settle more than 2,000 lawsuits lodged against it, NBC News is reporting.

    The news comes a day after the first of many pending state-driven opioid lawsuits -- this one lodged by Oklahoma -- ended in a judge ruling that the Johnson & Johnson comp...

    Many Health Care Workers With Flu, Colds Still Go to Work: Study

    Many health care workers are still on the job even if they have symptoms of a cold, flu or other respiratory infection, putting patients and coworkers at risk, a new study finds.

    It included more than 2,700 health care workers at nine Canadian hospitals who completed online diaries whenever they had symptoms of a respiratory infection.

    Half reported an acute respiratory vira...

    Immigrants Make Up 1 in 4 U.S. Health Care Workers

    They say good help is hard to find, and America's immigration policies could be making it even tougher in the health care field.

    Immigration crackdown efforts, the border wall included, are very likely to cost the elderly and disabled the care that they desperately need, a new study argues.

    More than 3 million immigrants work in the U.S. health care system, accounting for ab...

    Your Virtual Doctor Will 'See' You Now

    Need to see your doctor, but can't take time off from work? There's an app for that. And new research shows patients find the ability to see a doctor "virtually" convenient and satisfying.

    Nine out of 10 people who had a virtual visit with a doctor said it was more convenient than other ways of getting care, and it addressed their medical needs. Only four in 10 said they would prefer...

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