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Most Parents Clueless About Overuse Dangers to Young Pitchers

Before you sign your young pitcher up to play baseball in multiple leagues, familiarize yourself with guidelines that can protect them against overuse injuries.

Sound obvious? A new survey shows it isn't, because most parents have no idea what those guidelines are.

Players under age 18 are pitching more and more frequently, often for several teams year-round, which is prompting a ri...

Federal Court Backs Indiana University's Vaccine Mandate

Indiana University's mandate that most students be vaccinated in order to attend classes was upheld by a federal judge on Monday in what may be the first such ruling in the United States.

The decision came in a lawsuit involving eight students who claimed the vaccine requirement violated their right to bodily integrity and autonomy, and that COVID-19 vaccines should not be considered pa...

How Your Kid's Education Could Make You Healthier

If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

Long Distance to Care Can Mean Worse Outcomes for Young Cancer Patients

Teens and young adults with cancer who live in rural areas or far from the hospital where they were diagnosed are more likely to have advanced cancer and more likely to die, new research shows.

"A number of studies have indicated that place of residence can influence cancer survival; however, few studies have specifically focused on geographic factors and outcomes in adolescents and young...

Remote Learning Hurt High School Students Academically, Emotionally

There were academic, social and emotional consequences for U.S. high school students who attended classes remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

The study included more than 6,500 students in Orange County Public Schools in Florida, who were surveyed in October 2020, when two-thirds were attending school remotely and one-third were attending in person.

On a 100...

Half of U.S. Teens Plan to Get COVID Shot, But Can Numbers Go Higher?

Vaccine advocate Ethan Lindenberger, now 20, had to wait until age 18 to get the vaccinations that he knew he needed to protect his health.

"I knew growing up my mom was very anti-vaccine. Because of the legal restrictions, I really wasn't trying to fight her on getting me vaccinated," Lindenberger recalled. "She believed vaccines could kill me, and so it was not going to be an easy time....

Summer Drowning Deaths Can Happen Quickly: Know the Facts

The best way to prevent drowning in children and teens is to guard against the danger on multiple fronts, a leading pediatricians' group says.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released its "Prevention of Drowning" report online this week, which notes that about 70% of drowning deaths for U.S. children aged 15 and younger occur between May and August.

The report includes the ...

Hospitalizations for Teens With Eating Disorders Rose Sharply During Pandemic

The pandemic may have triggered yet another burgeoning health problem: New research suggests that more than twice as many young people as is normal were hospitalized with eating disorders in the first 12 months of the COVID-19 surge in the United States.

There were 125 eating order-related hospitalizations of patients ages 10 to 23 at the University of Michigan's health system in the fir...

Vaccinated Teachers, Students Can Skip Masks This Fall: CDC

When schools open their doors this fall, teachers and students who are vaccinated can enter without masks, according to a new guidance issued Friday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The relaxed recommendation comes as a national vaccination campaign in which children as young as 12 can get COVID-19 shots unfolds, accompanied by a general decline in coronavirus hospi...

School-Based Mindfulness Program Gives Big Boost to Young Kids' Sleep

THURSDAY, July 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Children tend to sleep less as they approach early adolescence, perhaps because of the pressures of homework and the presence of social media.

Now, new research suggests that loss of precious slumber is not inevitable.

The researchers found that a school-based program in mindfulness training — which involves being pres...

1 in 20 College Students Has 'Internet Gaming Disorder,' Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, July 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Is it possible to become addicted to gaming on the internet?

Yes, warns new research that discovered when young people get too hooked it may trigger sleep difficulties, depression, anxiety and, in some cases, even suicidal thoughts.

Phone interviews conducted among nearly 3,000 American college students between 2007 and ...

Young Cancer Survivors Vulnerable to COVID, But Often Shun Vaccine

Despite being particularly susceptible to severe COVID-19, many U.S. teen and young adult cancer survivors are wary of vaccination, a new study finds.

Cancer survivors often have weakened immune systems and are more likely to develop severe respiratory infections. That puts them at greater risk from COVID, so it's strongly recommended that they get vaccinated.

In the new study, rese...

Juul to Pay $40 Million in N.C. Case Over Vaping's Harm to Teens

Juul, the leading e-cigarette maker in the United States, has agreed to pay $40 million to settle a lawsuit by North Carolina that alleged the company intentionally got scores of teenagers hooked on nicotine.

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein, who sued the company two years ago, announced the settlement on Monday.

The company did not admit to any liab...

Sleep Apnea in Childhood a Bad Sign for Teenage Heart Health

Teens who've had sleep apnea since childhood have a much higher risk of high blood pressure than those who never had sleep apnea, new research shows.

"Our study showed that pediatric sleep apnea can act as a gateway to future hypertension," said study author Julio Fernandez-Mendoza, an associate professor in Penn State's Sleep Research and Treatment Center.

The U.S. National Heart, ...

No Drop in Teens' Use of Pot, Binge Drinking Despite Pandemic Lockdowns

U.S. high school seniors say marijuana was significantly harder to come by during the pandemic -- yet their use of the drug continued at rates similar to those before school closures began, a new study finds.

Their binge-drinking also continued at similar rates, according to the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

"Last year brought dramatic changes to adolescents' lives, ...

White House Says July 4 Vaccination Goal Won't Be Met

As vaccination rates among young Americans lag, the White House acknowledged on Tuesday that it will miss two key benchmarks in its nationwide campaign to stop the spread of coronavirus.

The first missed goal will be vaccinating 70% of all American adults with at least one shot by July 4, but officials stressed that threshold has been reached for those aged 30 and older and it should...

Marijuana Use Tied to Higher Odds for Thoughts of Suicide

Young adults who use marijuana appear to have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, according to a new study from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

In fact, the risk that someone between 18 and 34 will think about, plan for or attempt suicide increases with the amount of marijuana they use, according to results published June 22 in the journal J...

Pot Use May Change the Teenage Brain, MRIs Show

Smoking pot appears to affect teens' brain development, altering it in ways that could diminish their reasoning, decision-making and memory skills as they age, a new study reports.

Brain scans of about 800 teenagers found that those who started smoking pot tended to have increased thinning of the cerebral cortex -- the outer layer of the brain responsible for thought, perception and langu...

Fast-Food Companies Spending More on Ads Aimed at Youth

The U.S. fast-food industry has boosted spending on ads targeting kids, especially Black and Hispanic youth, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on ad spending and TV ad exposure for 274 fast-food restaurants and found that annual spending hit $5 billion in 2019, up more than $400 million between 2012 and 2019.

"Fast-food consumption by children and teen...

Obesity in Teens Raises Adult Diabetes Risk, Even After Weight Loss

In a finding that confirms what many suspect, a new study shows that teens who are overweight or obese may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes or have a heart attack in their 30s and 40s.

These teens are also more likely to have other health issues down the road, regardless of whether they shed any excess weight during adulthood.

"Adolescence is an important time period to p...

Looking for Love? Young People's Drinking Goes Up When Dating

When young adults are seeking a casual dating relationship, drinking is likely to follow, new research suggests.

Meanwhile, those who are already in a serious relationship are likely to drink less.

The study included more than 700 people in the Seattle area, aged 18 to 25, who filled out surveys every month for two years. The study used a community sample that was not limited to col...

Big Rise in U.S. Teens Identifying As Gay, Bisexual

More teens in the United States are reporting their sexual identity as gay, lesbian or bisexual, nationwide surveys show.

Between 2015 and 2019, the percentage of 15- to 17-year-olds who said they identified as "non-heterosexual" rose from 8.3% to 11.7%, according to nationwide surveys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Although our analyses demonstrated that t...

Gun Suicides Are Rising Steeply Among American Youth

A rising number of young Americans, including children, are taking their own lives using firearms, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2008 and 2018, gun suicides showed an "alarming" increase among Americans aged 5 to 24. And while those suicides remain rare among children, the rate among kids under 15 quadrupled during the study period.

It's well known that youth sui...

Teens Who Text While Driving May Take Other Risks Behind the Wheel

When it comes to teens, one risky driving behavior may beget other risky behaviors on the road: New research finds that those who use cellphones while behind the wheel are more likely to engage in other types of risky driving.

"This study found that frequent cellphone use while driving was only one indicator of a more general pattern of risky driving practices associated with prior crashe...

Teasing People About Weight Can Help Bring on Eating Disorders

What can make a young person vulnerable to eating disorders? Teasing them about any extra pounds they may carry, researchers say.

"Our findings add to the growing evidence that weight-based mistreatment is not helpful and is often harmful to the health of young people," said study leader Laura Hooper, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health, in Minneapolis.<...

Big Rise in Suicide Attempts by U.S. Teen Girls During Pandemic

The suicide attempt rate has leapt by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and by 50% during winter 2021, compared with the same periods in 2019, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...

Your Teen's Smartphone Could Be Key to Unhealthy Weight

Your teens' route to a healthy or unhealthy weight may be in their hands -- literally.

New research out of South Korea shows that teens who spend too much time on their smartphones are also more prone to eating habits that increase their odds for obesity.

One nutritionist who helps treat obesity in the young wasn't surprised by the findings.

"Spending hours on end on your phon...

Youth Vaping Rates Decline, But 1 in 5 U.S. Teens Still Uses E-Cigs

Although the number of teens who use e-cigarettes has dropped significantly, new research suggests that vaping rates are still too high.

"This study underscores that flavored e-cigarettes, especially JUUL, have caused the epidemic of youth e-cigarette use and nicotine addiction in the U.S. and shows why the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration] and other policymakers must act now to elimina...

Teens: You Got Your COVID Vaccine, What Now?

U.S. teens are getting their COVID shots -- how does that change their daily lives?

Besides letting teens resume many of their normal activities, U.S. authorization of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for people as young as 12 is crucial to slowing the spread of the coronavirus, one expert says.

"We know that teenagers can not only get COVID-19 but they can also transmit the virus,"...

As Teen He Made News Opposing Anti-Vax Mom. Now, He's Urging COVID Shots for Youth

Ethan Lindenberger knows what it's like when you have anti-vaxxer parents: At 18, he gained national notoriety when he sought vaccines in defiance of his mother's fervent wishes.

Now, the 20-year-old has some advice for teens facing a similar dilemma posed by the pandemic -- how to convince their anti-vaxxer parents to let them get the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Pfizer shot is now FDA--a...

Debunking Myths That Have Some Parents Resisting COVID Vaccines for Teens

Many health experts hailed the recent approval of the Pfizer vaccine for those aged 12 to 15, but some parents have been hesitant to take their kids in for a shot.

"Parents naturally worry more about their children than they do about themselves -- I think that's parenting defined," said Dr. Hina Talib, a pediatrician and adolescent health specialist at the Children's Hospital at Montefior...

Did a Ban on Flavored Vapes Raise Teen Smoking Rates?

A ban on flavored vaping products in San Francisco may have increased high school students' use of conventional cigarettes, according to a new study.

In 2018, voters in the city overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure banning the sale of flavored tobacco products.

An analysis of 2011-2019 data on high school students younger than 18 found that before the ban was implemented, past 3...

Diet Pill Use Could Be a Step Away From Eating Disorder

WEDNESDAY, May 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) - - Teenage girls who use over-the-counter diet pills and laxatives to lose weight run a very high risk of developing eating disorders, researchers say.

In a new U.S. study, girls who used diet pills had a 258% greater risk of being diagnosed with an eating disorder like anorexia or bulimia within five years. If they used laxatives, the risk was 17...

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Highly Effective in Kids 12 and Older

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine fully protects children aged 12 to 17, the company announced Tuesday.

In a clinical trial that included more than 3,700 young volunteers, there were no cases of symptomatic COVID-19 infection in the two-thirds of participants who received both doses of the vaccine, which translates into an efficacy rate of 100%.

That's the same rate that was reported re...

Heart Issue Spotted in a Few Young COVID Vaccine Recipients; Experts Say Shots Still Needed

A small number of teens and young adults have experienced heart inflammation after receiving mRNA COVID-19 vaccines produced by Pfizer and Moderna, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

The CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) said that it has received "relatively few" reports of the condition, known as myocarditis, among younger people who rece...

16 Candles? Time for Your Meningitis Shot, Molly Ringwald Says

Leslie Maier lost her son, Chris, to meningococcal meningitis more than 15 years ago, but by telling his story she hopes to educate other parents about this rare but potentially deadly illness that a vaccine can prevent.

Soon after Chris passed away in 2005, Maier joined the board of the National Meningitis Foundation. Now she leads the foundation's new initiative, called the 16 Vaccine c...

Biggest Reason Teens Injure Their Spines: Not Wearing Seat Belts

Two-thirds of spinal fractures suffered by American children and teens occur in car crashes when they aren't wearing seat belts, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 34,500 U.S. patients younger than 18 who suffered spinal fractures between 2009 and 2014. Teens aged 15 to 17 accounted for about 63% of the spinal fractures, two-thirds of which occurred in motor vehicle...

Pooch Power: How Dogs Are Helping Stressed-Out College Students

A help in 'ruff' times: When it comes to coping with the stress of college life, new research shows that vulnerable students are far better served by therapy dogs than stress management courses.

In the study, more than 300 students at Washington State University were randomly assigned to participate in one of three different types of stress-management programs for a month. Ea...

Online Therapy Works for Kids Battling Social Anxiety

Plenty of teens are burdened with a chronic and often paralyzing fear of being harshly judged by others. Unfortunately, many can't get in-person treatment that could help.

But now a team of Swedish researchers says that an entirely online version of a widely used behavioral therapy technique can deliver significant relief to those affected.

The finding could pave the way for easier ...

In One U.S. School District, Nearly 10% of Students Identify as 'Gender-Diverse'

Teens may be much more diverse in their gender identities than widely thought, a new study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 3,200 high school students in one U.S. school district, researchers found that almost 10% were "gender-diverse." That meant they identified as a gender other than the sex on their birth certificate.

Often, those kids identified as transgender, but many considere...

Bullying, Violence Common for Gender-Diverse Youth

Gender-diverse youths are three times more likely to be bullied and victimized than those who identify as male or female, a new study of more than 4,400 teens has found.

"Transgender youths reported the highest rates of all forms of peer victimization, which were double to nearly triple those of males and up to 2.6 times higher than those of females," said researcher Rachel Garthe, a soci...

Vaping Ups Teens' Odds for Asthma, Asthma Attacks

Though some think that vaping is a safer alternative to smoking traditional cigarettes, Canadian research suggests it could raise the risk of developing asthma or having asthma attacks for teens and adults.

"Emerging research really suggests that vaping may actually worsen preexisting health conditions such as asthma," said study author Teresa To, senior scientist in the Child Health Eval...

Pfizer Vaccine Given Final OK for Use in Adolescents

In a decision that clears the way for schools to reopen safely next fall, U.S. health officials on Wednesday gave their final stamp of approval for Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine to be offered to children aged 12 to 15.

The decision, which opens up millions more young Americans for immunization, came as COVID-19 cases and deaths in this country have already plummeted to their lowest le...

Obesity in Teens, Higher Risk of Stroke Before 50

Strokes are on the rise among people younger than 50, and new research suggests that packing on the pounds during the teen years is a big reason why.

The more overweight you were from ages 16 to 20, the greater your risk of having a stroke before age 50, the new study shows.

"Given ongoing trends of adolescents who are overweight and obese in the U.S., Israel and other Western count...

In Girls as Young as 7, Weight May Predict Odds for Eating Disorder

Could there be a way to tell years in advance which girls are more likely to develop eating disorders?

New research from Denmark suggests that childhood body mass index (BMI) may offer important clues. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight.

The new research linked lower BMI as early as age 7 with a higher risk of anorexia, an eating disorder in which people sever...

Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

"We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

COVID-19 Appears to Have No Lasting Impact on College Athletes' Hearts

Heart complications are rare among college athletes who have had COVID-19, according to a small study.

"Our findings may offer reassurance to high school athletes, coaches and parents where resources for testing can be limited," said senior author Dr. Ranjit Philip, assistant professor in pediatric cardiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, in Memphis.

For the ...

Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air pollution isn't hard on the hearts of adults only, suggests a new analysis that found it can raise blood pressure in kids as young as 5.

Children experienced increases in blood pressure if they had short-term exposure to air polluted with coarser particles or long-term exposure to finer airborne particles, and that also happened with long-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide, an air poll...

1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

"One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate in sports saw an increase in self-reported concussion could be ...

FDA Plans to OK Pfizer Vaccine for Those Aged 12 and Up

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration plans to expand emergency use of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine by next week so that children as young as 12 can be immunized.

After Pfizer's trial in adolescents showed its vaccine worked as well in teens as it does in adults, the FDA started preparing to add an amendment covering that age group to the vaccine's emergency use authorization, T...

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