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02 Mar

Daily Racism Increases the Risk of Heart Disease in Black Women, Study Finds

A new study finds Black women who experience racism on the job, in housing and with police are significantly more likely to develop heart disease.

19 May

HealthDay Now: Maternal Mortality Crisis Hits Black Mothers Hardest

HealthDay’s Mabel Jong will be joined by Stacey D. Stewart, the president & CEO of March of Dimes, and Dr. Chereena Walker, a hospitalist and mother of two from Missouri who experienced severe complications during her pregnancies. Stewart and Walker will discuss the risks that pregnant women — particularly women of color — face in the United States.

Health News Results - 481

Black Americans Would Reap Biggest Health Boon From Cleaner Air

While all Americans could benefit from proposed new limits on what’s called PM2.5 air pollution, new research indicates the change has the potential to benefit Black and low-income Americans the most.

The limits being considered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) could cut death rates in those more vulnerable groups by up to 7%, according to researchers from Harvard T.H....

Sometimes Hair Loss in Women Can Point to Bigger Health Issues

Hair loss can be devastating for women, but the condition can also signal additional health problems.

An American Academy of Dermatology expert offers information about the types of hair loss seen in women with darker skin tones, common types of medical conditions associated with hair loss and treatment options.

“Research shows that women who experience hair loss can ...

Cardiac Arrest During Childbirth Is Rare, But Some Women Face Higher Risks

It's extremely rare, but the number of women suffering cardiac arrest during childbirth is rising in the United States as older, less healthy women have babies, a new study finds.

One in 9,000 women hospitalized during delivery has a cardiac arrest -- a higher rate than previously known, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say.

"We did the study, b...

Black Patients Fare Worse With Deadly Lung Disease Pulmonary Fibrosis

Black patients are dying of pulmonary fibrosis, a devastating disease marked by progressive scarring of the lungs, at significantly younger ages than white patients.

A new study probes factors contributing to earlier onset of disease, hospitalization and death in Bl...

Primary Care Visits Shorter, More Prone to Error for Non-White Patients: Study

Do all patients get the same amount of face-to-face time when visiting their primary care doctor?

Apparently not, claims a new study that found Black and Hispanic patients -- as well as patients with public health insurance like Medicaid or Medicare -- tend to get the short end of the stick when it comes to the length of office visits.

In some cases, shorter visits can potentially ...

Pandemic May Have Caused U.S. Spike in SIDS Deaths in Black Families

During the first year of the pandemic, the United States saw a spike in the number of Black infants who died suddenly — worsening a longstanding disparity, a new government study finds.

The increase was seen in what's called sudden unexpected infant death, or SUID. It's a term used when a baby younger than 1 year dies from no immediately obvious cause, often during sleep. SUID includes ...

Racism Brings Worse Heart Health for Black Women

Black women who are exposed to certain forms of racism may be more likely to develop heart disease, researchers say.

Specifically, Black women who said they faced discrimination in employment, housing and in their interactions with the police were 26% more likely to develop heart disease than their counterparts who had not experienced such structural racism.

Structural racism refers...

Older Black Men Face Higher Risk of Death After Surgery

Older Black men are more likely than others to die after surgery, according to a new study.

Black men have a higher chance of dying within 30 days of surgery compared to Black women and white adults, and their odds of death after elective procedures is 50% higher when compared to white men, researchers found.

This may be because of the “especially high cumulative amounts of stres...

Black Patients With Dementia Are Less Likely to Get Appropriate Meds: Study

When Black patients struggle with dementia, they are less likely to receive helpful medications than their white peers, a new study warns.

Researchers looked at how often patients received one or more of five classes of medications commonly given to dementia patients living at home.

The study builds on prior research that has identified a racial gap in use of dementia medicine among...

Gene Could Predispose Some Black Patients to Alzheimer's

A gene variant found almost exclusively among people of African descent appears to substantially raise the risk of Alzheimer's disease, a new study finds.

The variant is in a gene called ApoE3, and it's apparently only harmful when it exists in combination with the ApoE4 gene — a well-known risk factor for Alzheimer's.

That gene duo was present in only 1% of the nearly 32,000 ind...

Black Patients Face More Screening Delays for Uterine Cancer Diagnosis

Black women are not getting the tests they need to diagnose uterine cancer early, according to a new study.

Previous research had found that Black patients are less likely to receive early diagnoses than people from other racial and ethnic groups. The new study showed that it’s because Black women were more likely to face testing delays or to not get recommended tests at all.

That...

Poorer Schools Could Bring Higher Dementia Rates Many Decades Later

What do race and early education have to do with dementia risk among seniors?

Quite a bit, a new study suggests.

Researchers spent decades tracking the onset of dementia among nearly 21,000 U.S. seniors, before reaching two main conclusions.

The firs...

Pancreatic Cancer Rates Rising Faster Among Women

While rates of pancreatic cancer are increasing for both men and women, they’re climbing the fastest among young women, particularly those who are Black.

“We can tell that the rate of pancreatic cancer among women is rising rapidly, which calls attention to the need for further research in this area,” said senior study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 14, 2023
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  • Allergists Less Likely to Check Black Kids for Eczema

    Doctors have dubbed kids' progression from eczema to asthma the "atopic march," and they know more about how it affects white children than their Black counterparts.

    Research scheduled for presentation at an upcoming meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) sheds new light on racial disparities.

    The atopic march typically begins early in life with ato...

    Stock Photos Used in Health News, PSAs Typically Focus on the Young & White

    When researchers searched for a stock image of a pregnant Hispanic woman for a science communication effort, they hit upon a problem.

    Many of the images were of young, light-skinned people without the diversity in age or race needed for projects aimed at other groups, their study...

    Black Stroke Survivors Less Likely to Get Treated for Complications

    Having a stroke is a life-altering experience, and complications can crop up afterwards, but a new study finds the color of your skin may determine whether you are treated for them.

    In the year following a stroke, Black and Hispanic patients were not treated for common complications as often as white patients were, researchers found.

    "Black patients were less likely to receive...

    Risks for Heart Failure Rise in Rural America

    Adults who live in rural areas, and Black men in particular, are at much higher risk for developing heart failure.

    Heart failure is a chronic, progressive condition that develops when the heart fails to pump enough blood for the body’s needs.

    Researchers from the U.S. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., an...

    Appendicitis Often Spotted Later in Black Patients

    While appendicitis is a common emergency, Black people experiencing its symptoms more often have a delayed diagnosis.

    But that doesn’t happen in lower-quality hospitals that serve more Black patients, according to new research. There, Black people are diagnosed more quickly.

    “There is clearly a benefit to patients being treated in predominantly minority-serving hospitals when th...

    Black Patients More Likely to Get Riskier Heart Surgeries

    Insured Black patients are less likely to undergo minimally invasive heart valve replacement or repairs -- relatively safe procedures -- than their white counterparts, new research shows.

    Black patients who need a mitral valve replacement are more likely to have operations that involve opening the chest and cutting through the breastbone to reveal the heart, a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 28, 2022
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  • Language Barriers Hold Back Many Asian Americans From Good Health Care

    Many Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander adults may have trouble accessing health care and insurance because of language barriers, a new analysis indicates.

    In a new repor...

    In U.S., Minority Communities More Likely to Have Water Contaminated by Toxic Metals

    U.S. communities with higher Hispanic, American Indian or Black populations also have the highest concentrations of metal in public water systems, new research reveals.

    Researchers from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City found significantly higher arsenic and uranium levels in public drinking water in Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native communities...

    U.S. Men's Race, Residence Could Raise Odds for Fatal Prostate Cancer

    The color of his skin and where he lives may influence an American man's odds of dying from prostate cancer, a new study reveals.

    Black men and men living in the Western United States face the most dire prognosis, American Cancer Society (ACS) researchers report.

    "Why prostate cancer mortality is so high in the Western region, including California, despite lower incidence rates over...

    Women's Depression Symptoms May  Differ by Race: Study

    Depression can be tricky to detect in some people, and Black women may exhibit different symptoms, leading to missed care, researchers say.

    Black women report sleep disturbances, self-criticism and irritability more often than the stereotypical low mood, according to a new study.

    As a result, standard screening tools may underdiagnose depression in Black women, the study authors sai...

    Race Could Affect Outcomes in Head-and-Neck Cancers

    Black patients with head-and-neck cancers have twice the death rates of white patients, and a new study suggests race itself underlies those differences.

    “What is unique about our study is it strongly supports the conclusion that Black patients seem to respond to therapy differently than white patients,” said study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 19, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • Gun Homicides Rose Sharply During Pandemic, Black Men Most Affected

    Gun deaths skyrocketed in the United States between 2019 and 2020, according to a new study.

    Men were most affected, with Black men most frequently killed in gun murders and white men in gun suicides.

    The study found that gun killing rates for Black people were nearly seven times those for white people. Between 2019 and 2020 alone, gun homicides rose 39% for Black people, highlight...

    Race Plays Big Role in Whether Kids Learn to Swim

    Black children and teens drown in swimming pools at rates seven times higher than white children, but a new survey suggests that special swimming programs could make a difference and help save lives.

    The survey, from the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, found that only 25% of Hispanic parents and 28% of Black parents were comfortable with their own swimming ski...

    Insulin Pumps Ease Diabetes Care. So Why Are Black Patients Less Likely to Get One?

    Insulin pumps can help folks with type 1 diabetes get better control of their disease and minimize how often they inject insulin, and use of the devices has taken off in the past 20 years.

    That's the good news from a new study.

    The not-so-great news is that a large gap in wh...

    Black Patients More Likely to Need Emergency Surgery for Colon Cancer

    Black patients are more likely than their white peers to need emergency surgery for colon cancer, which increases their risk for complications and death, study authors say.

    "Overall, these results suggest that racial and ethnic differences persist" among colon cancer patients, and "these differences likely contribute to disparities in postoperative outcomes among these groups," said firs...

    Race, Income Can Determine Blood Cancer Outcomes, Studies Show

    If someone is stricken with a blood cancer or life-threatening clot, they'll probably fare better if they are white and wealthy, three new studies show.

    The ongoing impact of patient race and income to medical outcomes was in the spotlight Saturday in New Orleans at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH).

    In one study, a team led by

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 12, 2022
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  • Black Patients With Brain Tumors Less Likely to Get Surgery Than Whites

    Black patients with brain tumors may be less likely to have surgery recommended to them than white patients are, according to a large U.S. study.

    The research, which looked at two national databases, found that on average, Black patients were less likely to have surgery recommended for any of four types of brain tumor. That included three considered benign (non-cancerous) and one that is ...

    Severe Seizures Are Rising, Especially Among Minorities

    Growing numbers of Americans are suffering prolonged, life-threatening seizures known as status epilepticus, and Black people are nearly twice as likely to experience these seizures as white people.

    These are the main findings from new research looking at hospitalizations for status epilepticus from 2010 to 2019 across the United States. Status epilepticus refers to ...

    Black Patients Fare Worse Than White Patients After Angioplasty, Stents

    Black adults who undergo a common procedure to open up clogged arteries are readmitted to the hospital more often than their white peers. They're also more likely to die in the years after treatment, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at how patients fared following balloon angioplasty and coronary stenting -- "one of the most common cardiovascular procedures performed in the U.S....

    HDL 'Good' Cholesterol's Role in Heart Health Under Scrutiny

    Blood levels of HDL, the famously "good" kind of cholesterol, may not make a big difference to heart health after all -- particularly for Black people, a large new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 24,000 U.S. adults, found that low HDL levels were tied to a somewhat higher risk of heart attack among white people. That was not the case for Black adults, however.

    Meanwhile, high H...

    As Segregation Rises in Communities, So Do Cancer Death Rates

    Whether you survive a bout with cancer may depend, in part, on where you live.

    Researchers at the American Cancer Society and Clemson University in South Carolina found a 20% higher death rate for all cancer types in the communities with the most racial and economic segregation.

    For lung cancer, the death rate was 50% higher in the most segregated counties.

    "Many people livin...

    Suicide Rates Declining for White Americans, But Not for Minorities

    In a finding that illustrates just how deeply racial disparities permeate the U.S. health care system, a new government report finds that suicide rates dipped slightly among white Americans while they rose for Black and Hispanic Americans.

    "Although the recent decline in suicide rates for non-Hispanic whi...

    Progress Against Stillbirths Has Stalled in U.S.

    U.S. stillbirth rates still need to be tackled at the local, state and national levels because efforts to reduce the risk have stalled, new research claims.

    Racial disparities remain as well, with Black women more likely to experience stillbirth (the loss of a baby before or during delivery) than white women.

    "Over the last 40 years, we have reduced certain risk factors for stillbi...

    Even in Kindergarten, White Kids More Likely to Join Extracurricular Activities

    Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.

    Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities.

    The study found similar results for other after-school...

    Low Vitamin D Could Raise Diabetes Risk for Black Americans

    Too little of the "sunshine vitamin" -- vitamin D -- in Black Americans could raise their odds of developing diabetes, new research suggests.

    Two new studies found an association between levels of vitamin D in the blood and insulin resistance, a precursor to full-blown diabetes.

    It's been long known that low blood levels of vitamin D "are associated with an increased risk of diabet...

    Common Blood Pressure Drug Might Prevent Alzheimer's in Black Patients

    A new study has shown the blood pressure drug telmisartan may offer new hope as an Alzheimer's treatment in Black patients. It did not show the same benefit in white people.

    Learning how people from different ethnic groups respond to the same drug could be key in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. Even though Black people are more likely than white folks to develop th...

    Physicians Say Faulty Oxygen Devices Put Lives in Peril

    Faulty readings by pulse oximeters may have resulted in more COVID deaths among minorities, doctors warned in testimony before a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel this week.

    Pulse oximeters are small devices that read a person's blood oxygen levels via a fingertip. During the pandemic, health workers used the readings to help determine who should receive scarce medications...

    Impact of Racism Could Slow Recovery After Heart Attack

    Discrimination doesn't just cause emotional pain in the moment, it may affect a victim's physical recovery from a heart attack, new research suggests.

    In studying more than 2,600 heart attack survivors between the ages of 18 and 55, researchers found that those reporting more perceived discrimination were more likely to have poorer outcomes.

    A year after their heart attacks, they ha...

    Black, Hispanic COVID Patients Less Likely to Get Antiviral Paxlovid

    Black and Hispanic patients are less likely to be given antiviral drugs such as Paxlovid to help battle a bout of COVID-19 than white patients are, a new government report shows.

    In a st...

    Deadly Aneurysm-Linked Strokes Are Rising, Especially Among Black Americans

    An often-deadly type of stroke -- subarachnoid hemorrhage -- is on the upswing in the United States, particularly among Black people, new research shows.

    Unlike the more common ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage happens when there is bleeding in the space between the ...

    Black Americans Less Likely to Receive Lifesaving CPR: Study

    When someone collapses in front of witnesses, the chances of receiving potentially lifesaving CPR may partly depend on the color of their skin, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that when Black and Hispanic Americans suffer cardiac arrest, they are up to 37% less likely than white people to receive bystander CPR in public places and at home.

    The reasons for the disparity are ...

    Woman Sues L'Oreal Over Claim Hair Straightener Spurred Uterine Cancer

    A Missouri woman has sued L'Oréal and several other beauty product companies, alleging that their hair-straightening products caused her uterine cancer.

    The

    1 in 10 U.S. Seniors Has Dementia; Minorities Hit Hardest

    One in 10 older Americans has dementia, and twice as many have mild mental impairment, a new study finds.

    As the nation's population grows older, the burden on families and society is likely to grow, and minorities will be affected most, experts say.

    "As the population in the U.S. ages, it is projected that there will be more cases of cognitive impairment, unless and until effective...

    Use of Hair Straighteners Tied to Doubling of Risk for Uterine Cancer

    Women who regularly use chemical hair straighteners may be more prone to developing uterine cancer, a new large government study suggests.

    The study, which followed nearly 34,000 U.S. women over a decade, found that those who frequently used hair straighteners were 2.5 times more likely to de...

    Black Americans Less Likely to Get Lifesaving Heart Treatments

    A person with advanced heart failure may often need a heart transplant or a mechanical heart pump to survive.

    But white patients are twice as likely as Black patients to get this critically important care, a new study finds, and racial bias may be the reason why.

    Black Babies Born Through Fertility Treatments Face Worse Survival Than White Infants: Study

    It's well known that Black women in the United States have an increased risk of childbirth complications. Now, a large new study finds even larger racial disparities when women conceive through infertility treatments.

    Researchers found that among U.S. women who'd undergone various

    As Tough Flu Season Looms, CDC Hopes for More Flu Shots Among Minorities

    It's a troubling equation: Many Americans with the highest rates of hospitalization for influenza have the lowest uptake of the annual flu vaccine.

    That's why the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is stepping up outreach to minority communities, including Black, Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) groups, and working to reduce barriers to vaccination.

    ...

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