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It's not just athletes on the field who suffer when outdoor temperatures get too high. Members of college and high school marching bands are at increased risk of heat-related illness, too, researchers warn.

"They go out there, and they often wear these really heavy wool uniforms," said lead author Andrew Grundstein of the University of Georgia. "They practice many times for hours and hour...

College athletes who suffer a concussion may take as long as a month to recover, not the two weeks considered normal, new research finds.

"Normal return-to-play time was previously set at 14 days — meaning 50% of people recovered in that time," said lead researcher Steve Broglio. He is director of the University of Michigan Concussion Center in Ann Arbor. "Our paper suggests that 28 day...

The pause in youth sports caused by the COVID-19 pandemic wound up shaking some budding athletes to their core, a new U.S. survey shows.

More than 1 in 10 youth athletes ended up reconsidering their sports goals or aspirations as the pandemic closed stadiums and gyms. That included one-quarter of athletes in their later teens, researchers found.

Some felt that the pandemic cost them...

Football and other contact sports get a lot of attention for their injury hazards. But for most adults, bike riding is the biggest back-breaker, a new study suggests.

Of more than 12,000 sports-related spinal injuries among U.S. adults, researchers found that a full 81% were due to bicycling mishaps. The injuries mostly included vertebral fractures, often in the neck but also in the middl...

Achilles tendon injuries have skyrocketed in the United States this year, researchers report.

Physicians at Michigan Medicine-University of Michigan diagnosed more Achilles ruptures during June 2021 than in all of 2020.

Injuries to the body's strongest, thickest tendon account for about 30% of all sports-related injuries, and are most common among active, middle-aged men, they added...

Having a genetic heart condition often means the end of sports for young athletes, but new research could be a game changer.

A 20-year study by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that for kids with most genetic heart conditions, the risks of playing sports can be managed through a shared decision-making process.

The study is a continuation of research on return to play ...

Young soccer players have more head impacts during practices but experience more severe head impacts during games, a small, preliminary study shows.

The findings could help devise ways to improve head impact safety in youth soccer, according to the researchers.

"Headers are a fundamental component to the sport of soccer. Therefore, it is important to understand differences in header...

To do their best, Olympic athletes need to be both physically and mentally fit, but the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions at the Tokyo Olympics has made that a real challenge, experts say.

"This Olympics is unprecedented," said Dr. Michael Lardon, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

The Tokyo Olympics itself, which officiall...

Before you sign your young pitcher up to play baseball in multiple leagues, familiarize yourself with guidelines that can protect them against overuse injuries.

Sound obvious? A new survey shows it isn't, because most parents have no idea what those guidelines are.

Players under age 18 are pitching more and more frequently, often for several teams year-round, which is prompting a ri...

A treatment commonly used to tackle an often painful Achilles tendon condition doesn't actually work, British researchers warn.

At issue is "Achilles tendinopathy," a degenerative wear-and-tear disease that affects the critical tissue linking calf muscles to the heel.

Patients have sought pain relief with a treatment -- embraced by a number of famous athletes -- that involves inject...

Athletes have a much higher risk of the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation than non-athletes, and younger athletes have a higher risk than older athletes, according to a new report from Britain.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is an irregular, often rapid heart rate that can impede blood flow. A-fib can increase the risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related problems.

...

Strict rest isn't advised after athletes suffer a concussion because it could slow their recovery, an updated consensus statement from a U.S. expert panel says.

Most adult athletes fully recover within two weeks and children within four, according to the statement published June 15 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

The number and severity of initial symptoms are th...

The nutrient zinc can be both helpful and harmful when it comes to kidney stones, a new study finds.

There have been two conflicting theories about the link between zinc and kidney stones. One suggests zinc stops the growth of the calcium oxalate crystals that make up the stones. The other suggests zinc changes the crystals' surfaces, which encourages further growth.

Turns ...

It may be possible to treat the thinking problems that result from repeated hits to the head, a new laboratory study suggests.

The new experiments with mice are the first to offer a molecular analysis of what happens in the brain after repetitive but mild blows to the head, said researcher Mark Burns. He is head of the Laboratory for Brain Injury and Dementia at Georgetown University, in ...

Heart complications are rare among college athletes who have had COVID-19, according to a small study.

"Our findings may offer reassurance to high school athletes, coaches and parents where resources for testing can be limited," said senior author Dr. Ranjit Philip, assistant professor in pediatric cardiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, in Memphis.

For the ...

Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

"One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate in sports saw an increase in self-reported concussion could be ...

As children begin to return to their favorite sports, parents need to ensure that their youngsters use protective eyewear, a leading group of eye specialists says.

Nearly 30,000 people suffer sports-related eye injuries every year in the United States, but 90% of emergency room visits for such injuries could be prevented by protective eyewear, according to the American Academy of Ophthalm...

Here's some good news for aging athletes: If you played high school football, you're no more likely than others to have problems with concentration, memory or depression in middle age, according to a new study.

"Men who played high school football did not report worse brain health compared with those who played other contact sports, noncontact sports, or did not participate in sports dur...

Young baseball players are at risk for overuse injuries, but there are ways to play it safe and prevent such problems, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) says.

"Overhead athletes, such as baseball players, place significant repetitive stress on the shoulder and elbow joints," orthopedic sports surgeon Dr. Nima Mehran said in an academy news release.

Between overuse ...

Though playing youth sports comes with new pandemic-era precautions and some experts are linking these activities to community spread of COVID-19, many kids are still participating, according to a parent survey.

In the survey, about three-quarters of parents said their child's teams mostly did the right thing while resuming sports during COVID. Thirteen percent said officials were too str...

FRIDAY, April 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) - Being active is good for most everyone, and new studies now show it can help kids with autism manage common behavioral issues.

"Exercise goes beyond health-related benefits and increased levels of fitness for those with autism," said David Geslak, a pioneer in using exercise to help kids with autism. "Research shows that exercise can increase focus...

The stereotypical image of pot smokers has long been one of "stoners" parked on the couch, surrounded by snacks and glued to the television, but a new study dispels that notion.

Instead, people who use marijuana may exercise just as much as other people do, and perhaps even a little more, researchers report.

Considering how important regular exercise is to one's overall health, the ...

Researchers outfitted high school athletes with head impact sensors to see which of four popular sports put them at the greatest risk of concussion.

No. 1 for both boys and girls: Soccer, according to a study published online recently in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine. Blame it on intentional headers, which accounted for 80% of head impacts in that sport.

"Provi...

Today's young athletes push themselves harder than ever before, which raises their odds for injury, experts say.

But there are proven ways to minimize injury rates, according to the Stanford Children's Health sports medicine team. Here's what they suggest:

Prepare for the season: Develop a comprehensive conditioning program for the off-season or when there are ...

Diabetes is never an easy disease to manage, but coping with type 1 diabetes can be a particularly difficult challenge for teens.

The transition from childhood to adolescence can be hard on both kids and parents, the JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) says.

As boys and girls with type 1 diabetes enter puberty they undergo lots of changes, including increases i...

After SARS-CoV-2 exposure, a 14-day quarantine is standard among university athletes. But shorter quarantines for these athletes, along with mid-quarantine testing, may improve their compliance without increasing the risk that they'll infect others, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from 620 U.S. college athletes who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 while in quarantine after e...

Kids and teens may be eager to return to their regular sports routines when it's possible to play again, after being sidelined by COVID-19 restrictions.

But a sports medicine specialist in California says they should take it slow to avoid injury.

"I understand the excitement about returning to sports, but sometimes kids can get too excited and rev up too soon," said Dr. Bianca Ediso...

The protective "bubble" that allowed National Basketball Association teams to keep playing during the COVID-19 pandemic revealed the magic of the home court advantage, new research shows.

The NBA halted its 2019-20 season in March, then resumed in July with 22 teams that were confined to play in a protective bubble at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla., instead of traveling.

For the...

A culture of toughness and resilience is encouraged among elite college rowers, but it can keep them from reporting injuries, a new study finds.

There's an overall myth among athletes that admitting pain is a sign of weakness and failure, the researchers said.

Irish and Australian rowers in this study felt compromised by lower back pain, which is common in the sport, the st...

In a rare bit of good news tied to the coronavirus pandemic, researchers say pediatric fractures plummeted by nearly 60% this past spring.

Investigators say the finding likely reflects the sudden evaporation of organized sports and curtailed playground use due to the threat of COVID-19.

"We compared fracture incidence in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic -- March...

Girls who played after-school sports in elementary school seem to have fewer symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) once they reach middle school, a new study suggests.

The research included both boys and girls, but the effect of sports on attention and behavior symptoms was only significant in girls.

"Girls, in particular, benefit from participation i...

Young athletes who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms should be symptom-free for 14 days and get their doctor's OK before returning to practices or games, according to a leading group of U.S. pediatricians.

An electrocardiogram (EKG) is also recommended for those who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in updated guidance.

"Exercis...

If your knees crack when you walk or run, don't be too worried, an expert says.

"Knee cracking could mean lots of things," said Harshvardhan Singh, assistant professor in the department of physical therapy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "If it is painful, then you should see a health care provider."

The cause can be a large kneecap that doesn't fit well into t...

Dance-related injuries treated at U.S. emergency departments increased by nearly one-quarter in recent years, a new study reveals.

Between 2014 and 2018, there was a 22.5% rise in such injuries, with more than 4,150 cases seen in ERs nationwide during that time.

Strains and sprains accounted for almost half of the injuries, according to the National Athletic Trainers' As...

If you're thinking about letting your child resume sports while the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage, a leading pediatricians' group says there are a few things you should consider.

To help families make informed decisions, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently released guidance based on the most current research.

"We recommend that parents talk to their pe...

With opioid addiction soaring in the United States, it should come as good news that an opioid painkiller may not be needed after a sports-injury repair.

A mix of non-addictive medicines may be safer and equally successful in managing pain after shoulder or knee surgery, a study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit indicates.

Concerned about the opioid abuse epidemic, doctors...

Athletes who play contact sports may develop subtle brain changes -- even if they don't suffer a concussion, researchers say.

Their study involved 101 female college athletes -- 70 who played rugby and 31 who either rowed or swam. All were concussion-free six months before and during the study.

Some rugby players had suffered a concussion before that time, while the rowers a...

When bike-sharing services open in cities, more people start to commute by bicycle and take public transit, new research shows.

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, bike commuting had increased by 20% in cities where bike-share systems were introduced, according to study author Dafeng Xu, assistant professor of public policy and governance at the University of Washington in Seattle.

If the coronavirus pandemic slows down and schools reopen this fall, student athletes will need sports physicals and their primary care doctor is the best person to do it, according to guidelines from leading U.S. medical experts.

"Whenever possible, the sports physical should be performed in the primary care physician's office, the same place where the child receives immunizations a...

Middle-aged men and women who develop high blood pressure while performing even moderate exercise may be at higher risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

"The way our blood pressure changes during and after exercise provides important information on whether we will develop disease in the future," researcher Vanessa Xanthakis, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University...

Screening to detect potentially deadly heart problems in U.S. college athletes saves lives, researchers say.

And it's also cost-effective. "It can be implemented for much less than the cost of a pair of athletic shoes," said study leader Dr. Kimberly Harmon, of the University of Washington School of Medicine, in Seattle.

Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death amo...

The brain damage that may occur in football players has received a lot of attention in recent years. But a new study suggests that former players who get a diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) when they're still alive may well be getting the wrong diagnosis.

CTE can only be diagnosed with an autopsy, the researchers explained. Other conditions could cause the symptoms ...

Less than half of patients with a sports-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) recover within two weeks, new research shows.

"This study challenges current perceptions that most people with a sports-related mTBI recover within 10 to 14 days," said lead author Dr. Stephen Kara, from Axis Sports Medicine in Auckland, New Zealand.

He and his colleagues analyzed recovery ...

A spirited game of ping pong may be more than just fun: New research suggests it could quell symptoms in Parkinson's patients.

The small study found that patients with the movement disorder had significant improvements in a wide range of symptoms after taking part in a six-month ping pong exercise program.

"Ping pong, which is also called table tennis, is a form of aerobic e...

A gene mutation implicated in the risk for Alzheimer's disease might also impair memory in soccer players who head the ball a lot, a new study suggests.

The finding could have implications for young athletes in contact sports where the head can take hits during play.

Among soccer players who headed the ball the most, those with the gene mutation called the apolipoprotein E ...

Cold, wet winter weather doesn't have to put the kibosh on your running. Just follow some basic advice to help you maintain your exercise program safely.

Before you head outside, check the forecast for temperature, wind and moisture. This is key in planning a safe winter workout, said Julie Ruane, a nurse practitioner in the sports medicine division at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical C...

Of all sports, football sends the most U.S. males to the emergency room, while cheerleading and gymnastics most often do the same for women and girls, a new report finds.

And, overall, U.S. emergency departments see about 2.7 million patients between the ages of 5 and 24 for sports-related injuries each year, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prev...

Teen girls who play several sports have a lower injury risk than those who focus on just one, a new study finds.

It included more than 1,100 girls who play basketball, soccer and volleyball. Most were middle and high school students; some were in college.

Girls who specialize too early in sports such as basketball, soccer and volleyball could find that a single-minded focus ...

It's called swimmer's shoulder, and it's an overuse injury that three-quarters of teen swimmers suffer from, new research shows.

The study authors also found that many young swimmers with shoulder pain believe it's just part of being competitive and successful.

For the study, researchers surveyed 150 high school and youth club competitive swimmers, aged 13 to 18, and found ...

Former professional soccer players have a significantly increased risk of death from brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, a new study finds.

Former soccer players were about 3.5 times more likely to die of neurodegenerative diseases than people in the general population, according to a study in Scotland.

"This analysis revealed that risk ranged from a fivefold...