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Health News Results - 43

The latest buzz on coffee? It may be good for your heart, a new, large study suggests.

Drinking light to moderate amounts -- up to three cups a day -- may lower the risk of stroke, fatal heart disease and all-cause death, researchers found.

"Regular coffee consumption of up to three cups per day is associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and str...

Coffee delivers the boost that many people need to start their day. Now, new research suggests this breakfast powerhouse may also provide some protection against COVID-19.

Consuming vegetables and having been breastfed might also reduce your COVID-19 risk, according to the new study from Northwestern University in Chicago. Conversely, processed meats may increase your susceptibility to th...

For decades, doctors have warned folks suffering from heart rhythm problems to avoid coffee, out of concern that a caffeine jolt might prompt a herky-jerky heartbeat.

But a large new study has found that most people can enjoy their morning joe or afternoon diet cola free from worry -- caffeine doesn't seem to increase most people's risk of arrhythmias.

"We see no evidence for this b...

Want to be good to your liver? Pour yourself another cup o' joe.

British researchers report that coffee of all kinds may reduce your risk for chronic liver disease.

Whether your java jolt is caffeinated or decaffeinated, ground or instant, makes no difference in its apparent power to ward off all sorts of liver disease -- as long as you have three to four cups a day, researchers say...

That third or fourth cup of coffee may do more than make your heart race: New research suggests it could significantly increase your risk of glaucoma if you're genetically predisposed to the eye disease.

The study included more than 120,000 British people, aged 39 to 73, who provided information about their caffeine consumption and their vision, including whether they had glaucoma or a fa...

You know you've done it -- stayed up too late and relied on coffee to get through the next day -- but new research suggests that caffeine can only do so much.

That cup or cups of coffee may keep you awake the following day, but your performance is likely to be subpar, especially when it comes to more challenging tasks.

"Caffeine will likely improve your mood and alertness and may he...

Energy drinks provide millions with a quick, caffeinated boost, but one young man's story could be a warning about overconsumption, experts say.

In the case of the 21-year-old, daily heavy intake of these drinks may have led to life-threatening heart and kidney failure, British doctors reported April 15 in BMJ Case Reports.

The young man reported drinking an average of four...

The sooner a pregnant woman gets a COVID-19 vaccine, the more likely she is to transfer protective antibodies to her baby, a new, small study suggests.

"This just gives extra fuel for people who are on the fence or just think, 'Maybe I'll wait until after I deliver,'" said study co-author Dr. Emily Miller. She's an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology and a maternal fetal medi...

As little as half a cup of coffee each day might be enough to stunt the growth and birth weight of a baby in the womb, a new study claims.

Women who consumed an average 50 milligrams of caffeine per day -- equivalent to half a cup of coffee -- had infants that were 2.3 ounces lighter than babies born to women who didn't drink any caffeine, researchers report.

That amount is a fracti...

Too much coffee during pregnancy could lead to kids with behavior problems later on.

That's the key takeaway from new research that examined 9,000 brain scans from 9- and 10-year-olds as part of the largest long-term study of brain development and child health.

"The goalposts are moved by caffeine, and there are subtle, but real changes in behavioral outcomes in most kids who were e...

Latisha Wilborne was excited. She and her husband had tried for a year to get pregnant, and now, 20 weeks pregnant, she was at a doctor's visit with her two sisters where an ultrasound would determine if she was having a girl or boy. A party to celebrate the news was just days away.

The happy mood changed when the doctor told Latisha they detected a problem with the baby's heart.

"I...

Fill up that mug: Having one or more cups of caffeinated coffee a day may reduce your risk of heart failure, new research suggests.

There was one caveat, however: Decaffeinated coffee doesn't appear to provide the same protection as caffeine-rich blends.

"The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising," admitted study senior author Dr. David Kao. "C...

If you have had a heart attack and a stroke, you might want to stock up on green tea.

New research from Japan finds survivors who drink plenty of green tea may live longer lives.

Stroke survivors who drank at least seven cups per day were 62% less likely to die during the study period, versus non-drinkers. Similarly, the risk was cut by 53% among heart attack survivors who downed th...

A cup of java may not be a bad idea for men's health: Drinking lots of coffee may reduce their risk of prostate cancer, researchers report.

The investigators analyzed data from 16 studies conducted around the world. Together, the studies involved more than a million men, about 58,000 of who went on to develop prostate cancer. The team was led by urologist Dr. Kefeng Wang, of China Medic...

If you've got type 2 diabetes and love drinking green tea or coffee, new research suggests you may be reducing your odds of a premature death.

But you need to really love these drinks. The study found that having four or more cups of green tea along with two cups of coffee daily was linked to a 63% lower risk of death during the average five-year follow-up.

On t...

Caffeine may reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease in people who have a gene mutation associated with the movement disorder, researchers report.

"These results are promising and encourage future research exploring caffeine and caffeine-related therapies to lessen the chance that people with this gene develop Parkinson's," said study author Dr. Grace Crotty, of Massachusetts General H...

Just a few cups of coffee a day may help slow down the deadly progression of advanced colon cancer, new research finds.

Of the nearly 1,200 patients in the study, those who drank four or more cups of java on a daily basis had 36% higher odds of surviving during the 13-year study period.

Metastatic colon cancer, which has spread from its original location, "remains an inc...

Women who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant may need to forgo coffee, tea, sodas and other sources of caffeine. A new data analysis finds no safe level of the drug during this time.

"The cumulative scientific evidence supports pregnant women and women contemplating pregnancy being advised to avoid caffeine," concluded study author Jack James, a professor at Reykjavik University...

Coffee has been tied to many potential health benefits, but people should drink it for pleasure, and not disease prevention.

That's one of the main conclusions of a new research review. In it, researchers give an overview of the evidence on coffee and caffeine -- the subjects of many health studies over the years.

"The impact of coffee consumption on health is important beca...

Your doctor may have cautioned that the caffeine in coffee can set your heart racing and cause an abnormal heartbeat. Well, that's bunk, a new study finds.

"We were unable to find any evidence that those who drank coffee had a higher risk of developing abnormal heart rhythms. That's especially relevant because a common reason that health care providers recommend avoiding coffee is pr...

Like your sweets really sweet? Try enjoying them with a cup o' joe.

Coffee makes sweet foods taste even sweeter, a new study shows.

European researchers tested 156 volunteers' sense of taste and smell before and after they drank coffee. Their sensitivity to smell didn't change, but coffee did heighten their sense of taste.

And this was true whether they dra...

Stay-at-home orders mean that many people are making their own morning coffee for the first time. Now, a timely new study suggests the healthiest way is with a drip coffee maker.

Researchers found that coffee drinkers typically enjoyed longer lives than nondrinkers, but only if the java was filtered -- suggesting espresso lovers might be out of luck.

The study, of over 500,0...

Your morning cup of coffee may help your focus and problem-solving skills, but it won't kick-start your creativity, a new study says.

"In Western cultures, caffeine is stereotypically associated with creative occupations and lifestyles, from writers and their coffee to programmers and their energy drinks, and there's more than a kernel of truth to these stereotypes," said study first ...

If losing weight sits high atop your New Year's resolution list, you might want to reach for a piping-hot cup of joe.

Why? New research suggests that just 4 cups of coffee a day can actually help shed some body fat.

The finding follows a 24-week investigation that tracked coffee's impact among 126 overweight men and women in Singapore.

Investigators initially set o...

If you ever get a blood transfusion, that supposedly pure blood is likely to contain something more: caffeine, cough medicine and an anti-anxiety drug, a new study suggests.

Oregon State University (OSU) researchers analyzed 18 batches of human blood serum pooled from multiple donors, and every batch tested positive for caffeine.

In addition, 13 batches contained the anti-an...

While 6 in 10 Americans say they're concerned about developing cancer, only 1 in 4 make cancer prevention part of their daily lives, a new online survey reveals.

Roughly a quarter think there's nothing they can do to prevent it. But the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) says as many of half of cancer cases are preventable.

"Tobacco use, diet, sun exposure, alcohol...

Debating whether or not you should have that second cup of coffee?

New research that links caffeine consumption to a healthy gut microbiome -- the trillions of microorganisms that live in your digestive tract and affect your overall health-- may prompt you to pour generously.

In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated associations between coffee consumption and lowe...

Teens who stay glued to screens, be it televisions or electronic devices, are not only getting less exercise -- they're more likely to down too many sugary, caffeinated drinks, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 32,400 U.S. students in grades 8 and 10. They found that more than 27% exceeded recommended sugar intake and 21% exceeded recommended c...

To the many ways in which coffee seems to confer unexpected health benefits, add a lowered risk of painful gallstones.

After tracking nearly 105,000 Danes for an average of eight years, researchers found that those who downed more than six cups per day of the world's most popular beverage saw their gallstone risk drop by 23%.

"High coffee intake is associated with a lowe...

No matter how tired you get during your pregnancy, a new animal study suggests that countering your fatigue with too much coffee might harm your baby.

Female rats that were given caffeine during pregnancy had offspring with lower birth weights, altered growth and stress hormone levels, and impaired liver development.

How much coffee is too much?

The findings sugges...

It seems as though every day brings yet another study on the effects of caffeine or coffee in particular. Researchers have looked at its effects on almost every aspect of health, from overall mortality to the heart, bones, kidneys, liver, fertility and more.

Sometimes, separate studies on the same aspect of caffeine consumption have contradictory findings, creating confusion. So, what...

If you struggle with anxiety, you might want to skip that second cup of coffee, new research suggests.

For some people, caffeine may help with concentration and provide an energy boost, but it can cause problems for those with general anxiety disorder, said Dr. Julie Radico, a clinical psychologist with Penn State Health.

"Caffeine is not the enemy," she said in a university...

Green tea is a popular health trend, with many people sipping it in hopes of deriving benefits from the brew.

There's nothing wrong with that, dietitians say -- green tea is a healthy drink loaded with antioxidants. But the jury's still out on many of its purported health benefits.

"Clinical trials related to green tea are still in their early stages," said Nancy Farrell All...

Sudden withdrawal from coffee and cigarettes can trigger symptoms that mimic serious disease, leading to unnecessary tests in hospital intensive care units, a new review concludes.

"Nicotine and caffeine are some of the most commonly used and highly addictive substances in modern society, but they are often overlooked as a potential source of significant withdrawal symptoms when abrup...

Coffee lovers can take comfort in a new finding that shows their caffeine habit won't hurt their arteries.

In fact, British researchers said drinking a lot of coffee -- even up to 25 cups a day -- doesn't appear to make your arteries stiff.

The investigators noted that reports on coffee have been conflicting and confusing, and they hope their study will put these rep...

From cappuccinos to cold brew, coffee is a morning must for many Americans, but is it healthy and how much is too much?

A University of South Australia study suggests a couple of cups to start your day probably won't hurt -- and may even be good for you. But drinking six or more cups of coffee a day can increase your risk of heart disease by up to 22%, the researchers found.

...

Here's more evidence that energy drinks like Red Bull and Monster are not risk-free. Researchers find they may boost blood pressure and the odds of electrical problems in the heart.

And they say caffeine isn't the culprit.

"Energy drinks are readily accessible and commonly consumed by a large number of teens and young adults, including college students. Understanding how the...

Java junkies can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee, and the more they drink, the better they can smell it, British researchers say.

It's a discovery with powerful implications for treating people addicted to substances with a distinct smell.

"The higher the caffeine use, the quicker a person recognized the odor of coffee," said study leader Lorenzo Stafford. He is an ol...

More young Americans than ever are turning to caffeinated energy drinks, and the trend is cause for concern, researchers say.

In a new study, investigators found a significant increase in energy drink consumption among teens, and young and middle-aged adults over the past decade.

Compared to people who didn't consume the beverages, those who did use energy drinks had much hi...

Need a quick pick-me-up? Just thinking about a cup of joe can give you a mental boost, researchers say.

"Coffee is one of the most popular beverages and a lot is known about its physical effects," said study co-author Sam Maglio, associate professor of management at the UNi. "Much less is known about its psychological meaning -- in other words, how even seeing reminders of it can infl...

It seems as though every day brings a new study on the merits -- or the risks -- of coffee. So what's the real scoop?

If you like drinking coffee simply for the pleasure of it, Harvard University research has found that sipping up to six cups a day is probably safe. Remember: Those are 8-ounce cups with about 100 milligrams of caffeine and little added milk and sweetener. A cafe drink...

Many older Americans are diagnosed with the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation, or "a-fib." Now, research suggests that everyday foods, drinks or activities might trigger episodes of the stroke-linked condition.

The bad news: Triggers include coffee, alcohol and sleepless nights. The good news: These factors can all be avoided or reduced, according to researchers at the...

Downing the wrong type of drink when you exercise could put you at risk of kidney disease, a new study warns.

Specifically, the threat is from having sugary, caffeinated soft drinks during exertion in a hot environment, according to researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York.

The small study included 12 healthy adults who did long stretches of exercise in a laborat...