Only Offering Janssen Vaccine by Johnson & Johnson

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Concussions".

05 Mar

Concussions Linked To Long-Term Sleep Disorders

Concussions and more serious traumatic brain injuries appear to increase the risk of sleep apnea, insomnia, sleep movement disorders and more, researchers say.

Health News Results - 54

Month-Long Recovery From Concussion Is Normal: Study

College athletes who suffer a concussion may take as long as a month to recover, not the two weeks considered normal, new research finds.

"Normal return-to-play time was previously set at 14 days — meaning 50% of people recovered in that time," said lead researcher Steve Broglio. He is director of the University of Michigan Concussion Center in Ann Arbor. "Our paper suggests that 28 day...

Why Are Sports-Linked Concussions Rising Among Girls?

Sports-related head injuries in male athletes tend to grab all of the headlines, but new research shows that female athletes are also increasingly at risk.

From 2000 to 2019, there was a threefold jump in sports-linked concussions seen among high school-aged girls. These injuries were most likely to occur during soccer, basketball, cheerleading, softball and volleyball, but they also happ...

When Are Head Injury Risks Highest for Young Soccer Players?

Young soccer players have more head impacts during practices but experience more severe head impacts during games, a small, preliminary study shows.

The findings could help devise ways to improve head impact safety in youth soccer, according to the researchers.

"Headers are a fundamental component to the sport of soccer. Therefore, it is important to understand differences in header...

Strict Rest Not Recommended After Sports-Linked Concussion, Experts Say

Strict rest isn't advised after athletes suffer a concussion because it could slow their recovery, an updated consensus statement from a U.S. expert panel says.

Most adult athletes fully recover within two weeks and children within four, according to the statement published June 15 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

The number and severity of initial symptoms are th...

Is Zinc a Friend or Foe to Kidney Stones?

The nutrient zinc can be both helpful and harmful when it comes to kidney stones, a new study finds.

There have been two conflicting theories about the link between zinc and kidney stones. One suggests zinc stops the growth of the calcium oxalate crystals that make up the stones. The other suggests zinc changes the crystals' surfaces, which encourages further growth.

Turns ...

New Insights Into Treating Mild Head Injuries

It may be possible to treat the thinking problems that result from repeated hits to the head, a new laboratory study suggests.

The new experiments with mice are the first to offer a molecular analysis of what happens in the brain after repetitive but mild blows to the head, said researcher Mark Burns. He is head of the Laboratory for Brain Injury and Dementia at Georgetown University, in ...

1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

"One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate in sports saw an increase in self-reported concussion could be ...

Head Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar Ways

Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury appear to affect the brain in similar ways, according to a study that may point to new ways to identify people at high risk for Alzheimer's.

"These findings are the first to suggest that cognitive impairment following a traumatic brain injury is useful for predicting the magnitude of Alzheimer's-like brain degradation," said study author Andr...

High School Football Doesn't Affect Brain in Middle Age, Study Says

Here's some good news for aging athletes: If you played high school football, you're no more likely than others to have problems with concentration, memory or depression in middle age, according to a new study.

"Men who played high school football did not report worse brain health compared with those who played other contact sports, noncontact sports, or did not participate in sports dur...

It's a Scream: Human Brains Alert to Positive Shrieks

Screams have different meanings, and you're likely to respond quicker to screams of joy than to those of anger or fear, a new study suggests.

Previous research has largely focused on screams triggered by alarm or fear.

In this study, a team from the University of Zurich in Switzerland examined the meaning behind different human screams and identified six emotionally distinct types: ...

Women More Prone to Concussion's Long-Term Harms: Study

After a concussion, women may be at heightened risk of lasting physical and mental symptoms, a new study finds.

The study of 2,000 concussion sufferers found that women were more likely than men to still have some symptoms one year later. The problems included fuzzy memory and difficulty concentrating, as well as headaches, dizziness or fatigue.

In contrast, women and men showed sim...

Which Kids' Sports Have Higher Odds for Head Injury?

Researchers outfitted high school athletes with head impact sensors to see which of four popular sports put them at the greatest risk of concussion.

No. 1 for both boys and girls: Soccer, according to a study published online recently in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine. Blame it on intentional headers, which accounted for 80% of head impacts in that sport.

"Provi...

Even 1 Concussion May Raise Your Odds for Dementia Later

Sustaining just one head injury may up your chances of developing dementia decades later by 25%, and this risk increases with each subsequent head injury, new research suggests.

"Head injury is not the only risk factor for dementia as high blood pressure and diabetes, among others, also contribute significantly to dementia risk, but head injury is one risk factor for dementia that is modi...

AHA News: Why Did Yankees Manager Get a Pacemaker, and How Does It Work?

With each beat of your heart, the muscle squeezes, feeding blood to the rest of your body. The squeeze is triggered by an electrical impulse.

Sometimes, though, a glitch slows that impulse. This can cause lightheadedness, low energy and shortness of breath.

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone felt those symptoms. Doctors traced them to a slow heart rate, and on Wednesday they addre...

Add Sleep Woes to Long-Term Effects of Concussions

Concussions can increase the long-term risk of a wide range of sleep disorders, a new study indicates.

Researchers looked at more than 98,700 U.S. veterans diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the same number of veterans with no history of TBI. The brain injuries ranged from mild TBI (concussion) to severe.

None of the participants had sleep disorders at the start of th...

Sports Position Doesn't Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE Illness

The position played in sports like football and hockey isn't associated with risk of a concussion-linked brain disease later in life, a new study suggests.

The number of years played doesn't affect risk of the neurodegenerative disease -- chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- either, researchers found.

CTE has been linked with repeated blows to the head. Symptoms include behavio...

Concussions More Likely in Practice Than Play for College Football Players

College football players suffer more concussions and head hits in practice than they do actually playing the game, a new study suggests.

Across five seasons of football, 72% of concussions and 67% of head impacts incurred by players on six National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I teams happened during practice rather than on game day, researchers found.

The inciden...

Nearly Half of Teens Get Behind the Wheel Shortly After a Concussion

Driving is a high-risk behavior for teenagers under ordinary circumstances, but new research shows that many who have experienced a concussion may be returning to the road too soon.

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) found that about 47% of teen drivers included in the study returned to driving within two weeks of...

Football-Loving States Drop The Ball on Concussion: Study

States with strong football cultures have often fumbled measures to protect young players who've suffered concussions, researchers say.

They analyzed youth concussion laws introduced by states between 2007 and 2014, specifically guidelines requiring a 24-hour delay before sending a player with a possible concussion back onto the field.

The researchers found that states with college ...

Playing Football at Young Age Doesn't Slow Concussion Recovery in College

Playing tackle football at an early age doesn't determine how quickly college players recover from a concussion, a new study finds.

"Because football is a very physical game and concussions can occur, it has been hypothesized that playing at an early age may interfere with neurodevelopmental growth and increase a person's vulnerability to neurological problems later in life," said re...

ER Visits for E-Scooter Injuries Nearly Double in One Year

As the popularity of electric scooters has accelerated in the United States, so have serious injuries, which nearly doubled in just one year, a new study reveals.

In 2019, more than 29,600 e-scooter riders were treated in U.S. emergency rooms, up from about 15,500 the year before, the researchers found.

"I probably operate on at least two to three people that have scooter i...

Put the Brakes on Driving After a Concussion

After a concussion, it may not be safe to drive for a while, a new, small study suggests.

"People who have concussions often have slower reaction times as a result, and do more poorly on tests of thinking skills after their injury than their peers without concussions," said researcher Julianne Schmidt, from the University of Georgia.

"Our study suggests that complicated dri...

Concussion Ups Odds for Many Brain Conditions

People with a history of concussion may face increased risks of certain psychological and neurological conditions, a large new study suggests.

The study of more than 186,000 Canadians found that those who suffered a concussion were more likely to develop any of several conditions, including: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); depression or anxiety; Parkinson's disease; o...

Blood Test May Reveal Concussion Severity With Accuracy of Spinal Tap

A simple blood test may predict the severity of a concussion as accurately as an invasive spinal tap, researchers report.

They focused on a biomarker called neurofilament light chain. This nerve protein can be detected in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid when nerve cells are injured or die, according to the study.

"When your brain is injured, neurofilament light chain leve...

Even Without Concussion, Athletes' Brains Can Change After Head Jolts: Study

Athletes who play contact sports may develop subtle brain changes -- even if they don't suffer a concussion, researchers say.

Their study involved 101 female college athletes -- 70 who played rugby and 31 who either rowed or swam. All were concussion-free six months before and during the study.

Some rugby players had suffered a concussion before that time, while the rowers a...

Concussion Can Lead to Vision, Balance Problems in Young Kids

Young children who suffer a concussion are likely to have vision and balance problems, according to a new study.

"Since one-third of pediatric and adolescent concussion injuries occur in elementary school-age children, we set out to provide a comprehensive description of children ages 5 to 11 years who were diagnosed with a concussion to pinpoint opportunities to improve the quality ...

Recovery From Mild Brain Trauma Takes  Longer Than Expected: Study

Less than half of patients with a sports-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) recover within two weeks, new research shows.

"This study challenges current perceptions that most people with a sports-related mTBI recover within 10 to 14 days," said lead author Dr. Stephen Kara, from Axis Sports Medicine in Auckland, New Zealand.

He and his colleagues analyzed recovery ...

Special Helmets, Safety Training Prevent Head Injuries in Youth Football: Study

Padded helmets and safe tackling and blocking techniques can reduce the chance of head injuries for middle school football players, a new study finds.

Young athletes make up 70% of America's amateur and pro football players. As head injuries in older athletes have been linked to a slew of brain injuries, attention is now turning to the safety of the younger players.

Robe...

Concussions Strike College Students Far More Often Than Thought

On college campuses in the United States, students suffer concussions twice as often as believed, and most of those injuries occur off the playing field, new research from the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests.

"This study shows how common head injuries are among this population and that concussions are not restricted to the athletic field," said study co-author Dr. John Brec...

Virtual Doc Visits Suffice for Many With Neurological Disorders

If you have a neurological disorder, a video chat with your doctor might be as good as an office visit for checking on your condition.

That's the conclusion of researchers who analyzed 101 studies on telemedicine use for concussion, traumatic brain injury, dementia, epilepsy, headache, multiple sclerosis, movement disorders, neuromuscular conditions and general neurology.

In...

Could a Concussion Raise a Teen Athlete's Suicide Risk?

High school athletes who suffer repeated concussions may be at heightened risk for suicide, Texas researchers report.

Data on more than 13,000 high school students revealed that those who had had a concussion in the past year (15%) were more likely to have feelings of depression, suicidal thoughts, and to have planned or attempted suicide.

About 36% of those with c...

Brain Damage From Concussion Evident a Year Later

Concussion damage may linger a full year after an athlete returns to play, Canadian researchers report.

"Brain recovery after concussion may be a more complex and longer-lasting process than we originally thought," said lead investigator Nathan Churchill, a research associate in the Neuroscience Research Program at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.

After a concussion, he sa...

Good News, Bad News on Concussions in High School Sports

New research on concussions reports mixed news for kids playing high school sports.

The good news? Concussions are down during football practices. And the number of recurrent concussions is down in all sports.

The bad news? Concussions are on the rise during high school football games, and football continues to have the highest concussion rates in high school sports.

...

Why Do Girls Take Longer Than Boys to Recover From Concussions?

Girls who suffer a concussion while playing school sports are more likely than boys to delay seeking specialty medical care, which can worsen their symptoms and prolong recovery, researchers warn.

That's the upshot from a study of 192 athletes between the ages of 7 and 18.

Senior author Dr. Christina Master said researchers have speculated that teen girls with concussions h...

For NFL Players, Career Length, Role Affect Future Health Risks: Study

Pro football players who had long careers at key positions are more likely to have concussion-related problems such as confusion, memory loss, depression and anxiety, a new study finds.

In a survey of nearly 3,500 former NFL players (average age 53), 1 in 8 (12%) reported serious cognitive problems. That compares to about 2% of the general U.S. population.

Age didn't...

E-Scooters Plus Drinking: A Fast-Pass to the ER?

Drinking and driving an electric scooter doesn't mix, according to a new study.

Researchers reported serious injuries like brain bleeding or fractures that have happened while riding an electric scooter (e-scooter). Alcohol and drugs were a factor in many of these crashes.

"E-scooters may look like fun and games, but it's a vehicle. It's a motor attached to wheels, and you n...

Concussions May Leave Former NFL Players With Another Issue: Impotence

Low testosterone is not something most people typically associate with NFL players.

But repeated concussions from professional football appear to be damaging the sex life of players, causing erectile dysfunction and lowering their levels of the male hormone, a new study claims.

"The guys at the highest level of concussion were almost twice as likely to report erectile dysfu...

Concussed NFL Players Sidelined for Much Longer Nowadays

The length of time that NFL players are sidelined after a concussion has tripled in the past two decades, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2012-2015 pro football seasons. They found that the players who suffered a concussion returned to play an average of 19 days later, which means they missed about 1.5 games.

Data collected between 1996 and 2001 showed ...

Steady Stream of Lesser Head Hits in Football Can Still Damage Brain

Concussions are bad news for the brain, but what about the less damaging hits to the head that are the nuts and bolts of contact sports? Do they also pose a threat?

The brain scans of 38 college football players suggest the answer is yes.

Over the course of a single season, the players collectively absorbed almost 20,000 hits. Only two of those were actually concussions. Yet...

Football Head Trauma Linked Again to Long-Term Brain Damage

Just how dangerous is American football?

Pretty dangerous, a new analysis claims.

Repeated exposure to head trauma during play often causes significant brain damage, researchers report. That damage then gives rise to neurological disease, which then boosts the risk for dementia by the time players reach middle-age and beyond.

The conclusion follows autopsies perfor...

Rugby-Style Tackling Might Make Football Safer

Could the rugby way of tackling lower the risk of concussions in American football?

A new study claims it could, by reducing the force of head impacts.

"For athletes who participate in a sport that involves a tackle or direct contact, adapting a rugby-style tackle where the players lead with their shoulders, not their heads, could make college sports safer," said study autho...

Mild Head Injury Can Impair Your Sense of Smell

Even a mild concussion can temporarily affect your sense of smell and trigger longer-term anxiety problems, a new study finds.

It's been known that such problems could occur after a major concussion. But this study found it's also true for minor concussions caused by accidents such as falling off a bike with a helmet on, having a traffic fender-bender, falling on the ski slopes, or sl...

Family Home, Football Field Most Dangerous Spots for Kids' Head Injuries

Falls from beds, uneven floors and playing football are leading causes of nonfatal brain injuries in American kids, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on traumatic brain injuries among kids and teens treated at emergency departments of 66 U.S. hospitals between 2010 and 2013.

Of those cases, 72% were attributable to products regulated by the U....

Athletes With ADHD May Need More Time to Recover From Concussion: Study

College athletes with attention- deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be slower to recover from a concussion and may have more severe symptoms.

That's the preliminary conclusion of a study of 120 U.S. college athletes who suffered concussions. Forty had ADHD; 80 did not. Of those with ADHD, half were taking stimulant medications for the disorder.

All were evaluated befo...

Ex-NFL Player Helps Researchers Probe Long-Term Effects of Head Injuries

Brian Duncan doesn't know why his brain still works as well as it does.

Duncan, 67, got his bell rung more than once during his life -- as a professional football player, an amateur boxer and a bull rider at Texas rodeos.

He remembers one time he got slammed into the ground by L.C. Greenwood, a 6-foot, 6-inch defensive end for the Pittsburgh Steelers, so hard that he halluci...

Concussion Recovery Isn't the Same for Every Football Player

Certain high school and college athletes require a longer-than-normal recovery period after a concussion. Researchers say blood tests can predict which ones.

"With so many people sustaining concussions and a sizable number of them having prolonged symptoms and recovery, any tools we can develop to help determine who would be at greater risk of problems would be very beneficial, so the...

Concussion Often Hits Elementary School Kids, Too

Concussions aren't only a concern for high school and college athletes -- they're also a leading injury risk for kids as young as age 5 who play sports.

That's the upshot of a new study of injury risk among 1,500 elementary school athletes in one Florida county. For the study, University of South Florida researchers focused on 5- to 11-year-olds who play recreational football, soccer...

After Concussions, Some Ex-Athletes Show Key Marker for Brain Disease: Study

High levels of a protein linked with the brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) were found in the cerebrospinal fluid of ex-athletes who suffered multiple concussions, Canadian researchers say.

The protein tau has been tied to CTE, a rare, degenerative brain disease believed to stem from repeated impacts to the head. People with CTE develop symptoms such as dementia, per...

NFL Retirees Help Scientists Develop Early Test for Brain Condition CTE

When NFL legend Frank Gifford died in 2015 at the age of 84, his family revealed that for years he'd suffered from mental issues caused by chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), tied to head trauma experienced during his years of play.

CTE was also thought to contribute to the suicide of retired NFL great Junior Seau at the age of 43.

But there's long been one tough issue w...

More Time Spent in Sports, Faster Healing From Concussion

It's a classic Catch-22: While kids who play sports are more likely to suffer a concussion, they seem to recover faster if they had already spent a lot of time on the field.

So finds new research that discovered kids who played a sport for at least seven years and had experienced a concussion recovered more quickly than kids with less experience who experienced a concussion. The study...

Show All Health News Results