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Results for search "Dementia".

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Lots of Nightmares in Middle Age Might Be Warning Sign of Dementia

THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- No one likes nightmares, but having persistently bad dreams may also signal impending dementia, new British research suggests.

In the study, people aged 35 to 64 who had bad dr...

Over 7 Million U.S. Seniors Have Mental Declines That Threaten Financial Skills

As Americans age, millions end up struggling with dementia or some level of memory impairment and diminished capacity to think clearly and make decisions.

Yet a new study says that despite such serious challenges, many seniors continue to manage their own finances, often alone, and despite a...

Mental Skills Slow With Age, But Seniors Gain in Other Ways: Study

Seniors, there's good news and bad from a new study of mental health. The brain-centered research confirms that mental skills do decline with age -- but it also finds many people over 60 having better psychological health than folks in their 20s.

"We wanted to better understand the interplay between cognition and mental health across aging, and whether they rely on activation of similar o...

COVID Appears to Raise Risk for Alzheimer's Disease

COVID-19 infection may significantly boost an older person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new, large-scale study suggests.

People 65 and older who contracted COVID were nearly 70% more likely overall to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's within a year of their infection, researchers report. Th...

Multivitamins Linked to Healthier Brains in Old Age

A daily multivitamin might help keep your brain free from any decline in thinking skills, a new study suggests.

In a trial of more than 21,000 men and women, the study authors reported that

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 14, 2022
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  • How Many Steps a Day (and How Fast) to Lengthen Your Life?

    There's an easy way to reduce your risk for dementia, heart disease and cancer: Start walking.

    Getting in those recommended 10,000 steps a day makes a real difference, new research affirms, but even fewer will pay big dividends. No matter how many you log, however, step up your pace for...

    Unhealthy Gums Could Up Your Odds for Dementia

    Gum disease has far-reaching effects and may increase your odds of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

    In a review of 47 previously published studies, researchers in Finland found that tooth loss, deep pockets around teeth in the gums, or bone loss in the tooth sockets was tied to a 21% higher risk of dementia and a 23% higher risk of

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 12, 2022
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  • Music: Bridging Memories for People With Alzheimer's

    Wes Mika started out on drums, but in his heart he was a tambourine man.

    “He got fascinated by the little silver discs on the tambourine,” said his wife, Susan Mika. “Sometimes he would hit the tambourine with the little mallets of the drum. He just he loved that tambourine.”

    Wes, 77, has dementia and lives in a memory care facility in Arlington Heights, Ill., a northwest su...

    Alzheimer's: Who Is Caring for the Caregivers?

    Katherine Sanden drove over 1,400 miles, from California to Nebraska, to care for her beloved uncle after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in November 2020, but seeing him after years apart was more devastating than she could have ever imagined.

    Like Sanden, many family caregivers are thrown into t...

    Like Humans, a Dog's Odds for Dementia Rises With Age

    Much like humans, dogs can develop dementia as they age -- and that risk climbs by half with every extra year of life in a dog's golden years, new research shows.

    The study, of more than 15,000 dogs and their human companions, found that just over 1% had canine cognitive dysfunction (...

    Too Much TV Time May Really Harm Your Brain

    Older adults who get a lot of "screen time" may have an increased risk of developing dementia — but a lot depends on what type of screen they use, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among older British adults, those w...

    In Trial, Brain Zaps Gave Seniors a Month-Long Memory Boost

    If you're a senior who struggles to remember where you put your car keys, could noninvasive brain stimulation boost your memory?

    Yes, clai...

    Everyday Activities That Can Cut Your Odds for Dementia

    Reading, doing yoga and spending time with family and friends might help lower your risk of dementia, a new study suggests.

    "Previous studies have shown that leisure activities were associated with various health benefits, such as a lower cancer risk, a reduction of

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 12, 2022
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  • When Older Dogs' Hearing Fades, Risk of Dementia Rises

    When dogs' hearing fades, their mental skills follow, new research reveals.

    For the study, the researchers examined the link between hearing loss in aging dogs and dementia. The findings shed light on ways sensory loss affects canine cognition (thinking skills) and could lead to better tre...

    Rural Americans With Early Alzheimer's Find It Tough to See Specialists

    Rural Americans with early-onset Alzheimer's disease are less likely than city dwellers to see a specialist and undergo tests that can help them and their families manage, new research reveals.

    While most Alzheimer's patients are over 65, about 6% develop the disease between the ages of 30 and 65. Typically, their mental decline is faster and more pronounced than that of older folks.

    ...

    B 8/10 -- Abnormal Upper Heart Chamber May Boost Dementia Risk

    If the left upper chamber of your heart doesn't work properly, do your chances of dementia climb?

    Yes, suggests new research that found it may raise the risk by 35%, even in people who have never had a

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 8, 2022
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  • Lifestyle May Be Key to Helping You Avoid Dementia

    Socializing, taking classes and exercising may boost your brain's cognitive reserve and stave off memory and thinking problems down the road, a new study suggests.

    Cognitive reserve refers to the brain's ability to withstand the effects of diseases like Alzheimer's and not show signs of de...

    Experiences of Racism Tied to Worsening Memory, Thinking in Older Black Americans

    Black and Hispanic Americans are more likely than others to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and new research suggests that racism is a contributor.

    Experiences of structural, interpersonal and institutional

    Rapid Loss of Smell May Be Alzheimer's Precursor

    Could the future of dementia screening include a test of a person's sense of smell?

    It may, suggests a new study that found the decline in a person's sense of smell could predict their loss of mental function and warn of structural changes in the brain that are important in Alzheimer's d...

    Even Chores, Socializing Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

    Your daily walk, cleaning the house and lunch with friends could together be keys to staving off dementia, according to researchers.

    A new study looked at lifestyle habits that could help lower risks, instead of factors that may contribute to the disease.

    Researchers in China combed t...

    Diets Heavy in 'Ultra-Processed' Foods Could Harm the Brain

    Eating lots of ultra-processed foods may dramatically increase your risk for dementia, according to a new study by researchers in China.

    Ultra-processed foods are high in sugar, fat and salt, but low in protein and fiber. Sodas, salty and sugary snacks and desserts, ice cream, sausage, deep-fried chicken, flavored yogurt, ketchup, mayonnaise, packaged bread and flavored cereals are all ex...

    Exercise, Puzzles, Games: They Help Men's, Women's Brains Differently

    Exercising your body and mind can help stave off memory problems as you age, and some of these benefits may be even greater for women, a new study suggests.

    The study looked at cognitive reserve, or the brain's ability to withstand the effects of diseases like Alzheimer's without showing a decline i...

    Even a Drink a Day Might Raise Brain Risks

    Even moderate drinking may be related to higher iron levels in the brain - a potentially risky situation for memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among nearly 21,000 middle-aged and older adults, those who drank as little as a few beers a week sh...

    Thyroid Trouble May Raise Dementia Risks

    Millions of older adults try to manage an underactive thyroid gland with daily medication, but a new study suggests they may still be vulnerable to developing dementia as they age.

    Researchers found that among over 15,000 older Taiwanese ad...

    Research Spots Gene That Raises Alzheimer's Risk for Women

    Researchers studying genes involved in Alzheimer's disease have identified a new gene, called MGMT, that increases risk for this common dementia in women.

    "This is one of a few and perhaps the strongest associations of a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's that is spec...

    Loved One With Alzheimer's? Make This July 4 'Dementia Friendly'

    A holiday filled with loud noises can be upsetting for people who have Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, but it's possible to create a Fourth of July celebration that works for everyone.

    "Being proactive, prepared and adaptable are the best ways caregivers can create a dementia-friendly Fourth of July for their loved ones," said Jennifer Reeder, director of educational and social s...

    Brain Changes Link Menopause With Higher Alzheimer's Risk

    Women are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than men, and a new study shows that certain brain changes known to increase this risk may accrue during menopause.

    Women who have gone through menopause have more white matter hyperintensities in their brains than premenopausal women or men of the same age, res...

    Could Getting Your Flu Shot Help Prevent Alzheimer's?

    A yearly flu shot may do more than protect you from a nasty bout of influenza: New research suggests it may help guard against Alzheimer's disease as well.

    People who were vaccinated at least once over four years were 40% less likely to develop

    Vision Issues Could Raise Odds for Dementia

    Untreated vision loss may put an older adult at an increased risk for dementia, though it's not clear why, according to a new study.

    Researchers found that the likelihood of having some form of cognitive impairment was 137% higher in seniors who had trouble seeing than in those without vision issues. Cognitive impairment is a general term for problems with thinking and memory.

    "Alt...

    Inhaled Pollutants Go Directly From Lungs to Brain: Study

    Breathing in air pollution can lead to toxic particles entering the brain -- and not just through the nose. New research suggests they have a direct pathway through the bloodstream, potentially contributing to brain disorders and neurological damage.

    "There are gaps in our knowledge around the harmful...

    Researchers Spot Sign of Alzheimer's Risk That Scammers Love

    Could the way a senior handles his or her money offer clues about their risk for Alzheimer's disease?

    Yes, according to a new study involving dozens of elderly men and women that found a higher likelihood to give away money to anonymous individuals correlated with a poorer ...

    Salsa Is Smart: Latin Dance May Boost Your Aging Brain

    Latin dance classes may be a great workout and social outlet, but new research suggests that learning the intricate steps of the salsa, samba and merengue may also improve your memory.

    In the study, a Latin dance program was offered to more than 300 Spanish speakers over four years at 12 different sites in Chic...

    Veterans May Face Lower Risk for CTE Than Ex-Athletes

    A degenerative brain condition uncovered in some former professional athletes has been reported in military veterans as well, but a new study suggests it's uncommon and questions whether service itself confers the risk.

    At issue is a condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a form of p...

    Shingles Won't Raise Risk for Dementia: Study

    If you've survived a painful bout of shingles, at least you won't have to worry that it might raise your future risk of dementia, new research indicates.

    Shingles, caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus, results in a blistering rash from nerve inflammation, and there has been speculation that the in...

    Isolation May Raise Odds for Dementia, Brain Study Suggests

    Staying connected to others may help protect your brain as you age, new research reveals.

    The study showed that social isolation - but not loneliness - can cause changes to ce...

    What People With Early-Onset Dementia Want You to Know

    An elevator encounter that happened to Laurie Waters highlights the daily plight faced by early-onset Alzheimer's patients like her.

    Waters, 57, was stuck in an elevator at an Alzheimer's convention with other folks who were growing loud and excited -- and the situation was getting to her.

    "I ...

    Risk Factors for Dementia May Change With Age

    Dementia risk factors appear to shift with age, and experts say knowing that could help people make lifestyle changes to reduce their chances of developing the disease.

    "Dementia is a complicated disease and risk prediction scores need to b...

    Major Head Trauma May Up Risks for Dementia

    People who've had a major traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be at increased risk for dementia, according to a new study.

    "Approximately 1 in 10 people in our study who had major TBI did develop dementia," said study co-author Dr. Rahul Raj, ...

    Adding These Foods to Your Diet Could Keep Dementia Away

    A diet rich in the antioxidants that leafy, green vegetables and colorful fruit deliver is good for your body, and now new research shows it also protects your brain.

    In the study, people whose blood contained the highest amounts of three key antioxidants were less likely to develop all-cause dementia than those whose...

    Heart Risk Factors Can Be Recipe for Dementia

    The faster you pile up heart disease risk factors, the greater your odds of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

    Previous research has linked heart health threats such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity with mental decline and dementia.

    Amassing those risk factors at a faster pace boosts your risk for

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 25, 2022
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  • Former College Football Players Suffer More Brain Disorders as They Age

    College football players live longer than those who didn't play, but they suffer more brain-related issues as they age, a new study finds.

    Among former Notre Dame football players, being physically fit was tied to lower deaths from heart disease and diabetes. But the former players were five times more likely to have impaired thinking and memory ("cognition") and 2.5 times more likely to ...

    Race Plays Huge Role in Dementia Risk

    Black, Hispanic and Asian Americans have an increased risk of being diagnosed with dementia as they age -- for reasons that are not entirely understood, a large new study finds.

    The study, of nearly 1.9 million older U.S. veterans, found that compared with their white counterparts, Black vets were 54% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia over a decade. That risk was nearly doubled am...

    How Does Exercise Guard Against Dementia? Study Reveals Clues

    Exercise may help safeguard your brain as you age, and a new study suggests how this might happen.

    Previous research has shown that physical activity helps protect brain cells. This paper indicates it may do that through lower levels of insulin and body fat.

    "These results may help us to understand how physical activity affects brain health, which may guide us in developing strategi...

    Live Healthy, Live Longer Without Dementia

    Staving off Alzheimer's disease might just take a healthy diet, exercise and an active mind, a new study suggests.

    Women and men who follow a healthy lifestyle live longer - and longer without Alzheimer's or other dementias, researchers say.

    "Eating a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 14, 2022
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  • New Insights Into Why Alzheimer's Can Bring Drowsiness

    Alzheimer's patients are often drowsy during the day, but it might not be because of poor sleep at night.

    Instead, a clinical trial that monitored patients' sleep and then studied their brains after death discovered an entirely different reason for such sleepiness -- they suffer a loss of neurons th...

    New Charts Track 'Normal' Brain Growth, Decline Through the Life Span

    Doctors use all sorts of tools to determine if a person is fit and developing normally -- charts tracking height and weight for growing children, tables showing healthy blood pressure and cholesterol in adults.

    Now an international team of researchers has created the first standardized tool to track ...

    Half of Americans Now Die With Dementia Diagnosis, Better Record-Keeping May Be Why

    A record number of American adults are now dying with a dementia diagnosis, new research shows.

    Yet, that increase of 36% from two decades ago may have more to do with better record-keeping than an actual rise in dementia cases, the study authors said.

    About half of all older adults are diagnosed with de...

    Early Promise From Experimental Drug to Treat Alzheimer's

    Researchers are working on a pill that might safely help people with early Alzheimer's disease improve their thinking and memory skills and possibly even live independently longer.

    The new study was only designed to gather data on the experimental drug's safety, but when 26 patients with mild to mod...

    Bruce Willis Stepping Down From Acting After Brain Disorder Diagnosis

    "Die Hard" star Bruce Willis is stepping away from acting following a recent diagnosis of aphasia, a disorder affecting the part of the brain responsible for language.

    Willis' ex-wife Demi Moore, current wife Emma Heming Willis and daughters announced his decision in an Instagram post Wednesday, noting that "he has bee...

    Mental Decline Can Follow a Heart Attack

    As if recovering from a heart attack wasn't hard enough, new research shows many patients may suffer severe thinking declines.

    Researchers in Poland found that in the six months after a

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  • March 25, 2022
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