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MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2023 (Healthday News) -- Two new gene-editing treatments that target dangerously high levels of cholesterol in people with a genetic predisposition to the condition were found safe and effective in new, groundbreaking research.

While powerful drugs like statins can help manage cholesterol in most people, they can't treat those who have genes that predispose them to h...

While the neurological impact of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long been studied, new research suggests TBIs are also hard on the heart.

The research team took a closer look at connections between the two organs, finding that nervous system dysfunction, neuro-inflammation, changes in the brain-gut connection and post-injury health issues may increase risk of both cardiovascular and ...

As more people are advised to shun meat, a new study from Australia adds to evidence that a vegetarian diet can help improve heart health.

A review of 20 prior investigations found that folks who followed a vegetarian diet for six months, on average, saw improvements in cholesterol, blood sugar and body weight.

The study analysis “provides support to the current knowledge that eat...

In yet another example of inequities in U.S. health care, new research indicates that many women and minority men who need statins to protect their heart aren't getting them.

“The recommendation to use statins to treat and prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has been supported by guidelines from major clinical societies for decades,” said study author

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 26, 2023
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  • It doesn't matter if you exercise every day or squeeze it all into the weekend. If you do the recommended 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, you'll get heart benefits, a new study finds.

    Both regimens protect you from atrial fibrillation (a-fib), heart attack, heart failure and stroke, compared with inactivity, researchers reported in the July 18 issue of the <...

    Your gut bacteria could affect your risk for the fatty deposits in heart arteries -- and future heart attacks, researchers say.

    A new study finds a link between the levels of certain microbes in the gut and these coronary atherosclerotic plaques.

    Led by researchers from Uppsala and Lund Universities in Sweden, the study analyzed gut bacteria and cardiac images from nearly 9,000 Swed...

    Millions of Americans take cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins, but a new study finds Black and Hispanic adults get the drugs less often than white people do.

    “This adds to the known racial and ethnic disparities already highly prevalent in heart disease,” said lead author Dr. Ambarish Pandey, an assistan...

    One way to reduce the risk of heart disease: Eat more nuts and seeds, according to a new review of 60 studies.

    Scandinavian researchers found that eating nuts could reduce the risk of a heart attack.

    “If you eat a handful of nuts every day, that is around 30 grams, you will have a 20% to 25% lower risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease. In comparison, adults in the Nordic c...

    Not everyone can tolerate statins to reduce their high cholesterol, but now a new study finds the medication bempedoic acid (Nexletol) reduced the combined rate of bad cardiovascular events by 13%.

    “We're very pleased with the results,” said study chair Dr. Steven Nissen, chief academic officer of ...

    Twenty percent of folks who are at high risk for heart disease refuse statins that could help prevent it, researchers report.

    They found that women were about 20% more likely than men to decline statin drugs when they were first recommended and about 50% more likely to never accept a statin recommendation.

    The research began when

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 28, 2023
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  • New research suggests that smoking weed is far from benign: Toking every day might raise your odds of heart disease.

    The increased risk is not insignificant. Daily marijuana users are about one-third more likely to develop coronary artery disease, compared with people who have never used the drug, researchers say.

    Marijuana is becoming more widely available and its link with heart ...

    You might not think about your cholesterol very often, if ever, but it's important to know your numbers.

    It's even helpful to get it checked at a young age, according to one heart expert.

    “People in their 20s may never consider getting their cholesterol checked, but they should because it may uncover a genetic predisposition to high cholesterol that they didn't know about,” said...

    Persistent asthma may take a toll on the heart, not just the lungs, a new study suggests.

    When the respiratory condition is relentless, it appears tied to plaque in the carotid arteries, increasing the risk for heart attack and stroke, researchers say.

    The carotid arteries — large arteries on the sides of the neck — carry blood to the brain.

    In a study of more than ...

    Folks taking dietary supplements intended to help their heart health are just wasting their money, a new clinical trial suggests.

    Six supplements widely promoted as heart-healthy — fish oil, cinnamon, garlic, turmeric, plant sterols and red yeast rice — didn't do a thing to lower “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol or improve heart health, researchers found.

    “C...

    Millions of people take daily medication to lower their cholesterol levels and prevent heart attacks, but there hasn't been a drug that targets a dangerous type of cholesterol in the blood known as lipoprotein(a), or Lp(a).

    That's why a new study of an investigational drug called olpasiran, which blocks the production of apolipoprotein(a) — a key component of Lp(a) — is generating a l...

    Folks suffering chest pain from clogged arteries appear to have some true flexibility in choosing the medical care that's right for them, researchers report.

    That's because their overall risk of death is about the same whether they choose aggressive surgical treatment or a more conservative approach focused on medication and lifestyle changes, according to seven-year clinical trial result...

    Cholesterol-lowering statins are proven lifesavers, but they've also gained a reputation for causing muscle aches and pains in a good number of patients.

    That reputation is undeserved, according to a new large-scale analysis of data from nearly two dozen clinical trials of statins.

    There's a...

    Social isolation and loneliness put people at a 30% higher risk of heart attack, stroke or death from either, a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    The statement also highlights the lack of data on interventions that could improve heart health in isolated or lonely people. It was published Aug. 4 in the

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 5, 2022
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  • A daily hamburger might raise the risk of developing heart disease, but not necessarily for the reasons people often think, new research suggests.

    The study of nearly 4,000 older Americans found what many have before: People who ate a lot of red meat had a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke.<...

    Women who are their own bosses might have healthier hearts to show for it, a new study suggests.

    The study, of more than 4,600 working U.S. women, found that those who were self-employed typically got more exercise and were less likely to be obese or have

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • Next time you work out, maybe take a 15-minute sauna when you're done for extra heart health benefits.

    That's the main finding of research out of Finland. It found taking a sauna confers additional cardiovascular benefits over exercise alone.

    The new study didn't look at how saunas can boost heart health, but other studies have elucidated these benefits. It has been shown "that some...

    Deaths from heart-related causes have dropped over the past 20 years, though differences persist by race and ethnicity as well as where people live and their access to care.

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), which partially funded the research, detailed the results of three papers. The findings were published July 18 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation

    Less than 7% of U.S. adults are in good cardiometabolic shape, and new research warns the trend is only getting worse.

    Cardiometabolic health is an umbrella term that includes blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol, weight and/or the presence of heart disease.

    "While w...

    There's some discouraging news for baby boomers.

    Americans born between 1948 and 1965 are more likely than the generations that preceded them to have multiple health problems as they age, a new study shows.

    And, many develop ...

    One year of testosterone therapy for men with low levels of the hormone does not appear to increase their risk for heart problems, British researchers found.

    "We were unable to find evidence ... that testosterone increases risks of mortality or cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular [heart and/or stroke] events in the short- to medium-term in men with low testosterone," said study leader D...

    Adult survivors of childhood cancer have a higher risk of heart problems than other adults, but are much less likely to be treated for heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol, new research shows.

    The findings highlight the need for greater awareness among both doctors and patients of the increased risk of heart disease among the estimated 500,...

    A combination of genetic testing and health screenings could identify more than 1 million U.S. adults with an inherited risk for a cholesterol disorder that increases their risk for premature heart attack and death, according to a new study.

    About 1 in 250 Americans may have at least one gene for

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 18, 2022
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  • As early as age 6, children who carry extra weight could be headed down a path toward future diabetes or heart disease, a new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 1,000 Danish children, found that kids who were overweight often had elevations in blood sugar and insulin by the time ...

    The toll of child abuse is wide-ranging and long-lasting. Researchers warn that childhood abuse is tied to high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes in adulthood, raising odds for heart disease and stroke.

    In contrast, those who grew up in nurturing homes are less likely to have heart disease risk factors.

    "Our findings demonstrate how the negative and positive experiences we have in chi...

    The faster you pile up heart disease risk factors, the greater your odds of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

    Previous research has linked heart health threats such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity with mental decline and dementia.

    Amassing those risk factors at a faster pace boosts your risk for

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 25, 2022
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  • Avocado toast has become the favored breakfast of the healthy and fit, and now new research suggests their choice may protect their hearts.

    People who ate half an avocado twice a week had a 16% lower risk of cardiovascular disease and a 21% lower risk of heart disease, compared with people w...

    In yet another finding that highlights the health perks coffee can brew, new studies show that having two to three cups a day not only wakes you up, it's also good for your heart and may help you live longer.

    In this largest ever analysis of nearly 383,000 men and women who were part of the UK Biobank, researchers discovered that, over 10 years, drinking two to three cups of coffee a day ...

    Millions of people taking statin drugs to lower their cholesterol may get an unanticipated benefit: They may be less likely to develop movement and balance problems like those seen in Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests.

    The study looked at the relationship between statin use and

  • Consumer news
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  • March 24, 2022
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  • Older adults may not only be living longer, but better as well, according to a new U.K. study.

    Researchers found that since the 1990s, British adults age 65 and up have been enjoying more years living independently, free of disability.

    That's despite the fact that many chroni...

    Stroke survivors may be watching their "bad" cholesterol, but a new study suggests another type of blood fat could put them at risk of a repeat stroke within the next year.

    Researchers found that stroke survivors with high triglycerides suffered repeat strokes at about twice the rate of survivor...

    Your annual screening mammogram may do more than spot breast cancer early - it may give you a heads up on your heart disease risk, too.

    Digital breast X-rays can also detect a build-up of calcium in the arteries of your breasts, an early sign of heart disease. These white ...

    Are you managing a chronic health problem, be it obesity or diabetes or heart disease or asthma?

    There's likely an app for that.

    Health apps are becoming more and more sophisticated, offering smartphone users help in dealing with chronic ailments, said Dr. David Bates, chief of internal med...

    When your cardiologist orders a test, do you stop to ask why you need it? You probably don't - but perhaps you should, according to a new report from the American Heart Association (AHA).

    Too many Americans receive heart tests and treatments that do little good, and more needs to be done about it, the AHA says.

    The issue of "low-value" medical care is a longstanding one - with about...

    Eating vegetables may not help protect you against heart disease, according to a new study that's triggered strong reactions from critics.

    The analysis of the diets of nearly 400,000 British adults found that raw vegetables could benefit the heart, but not cooked vegetables. However, the resea...

    Most gene variants that have been labeled "pathogenic" may make only a small difference in a person's risk of actually developing disease, a new study suggests.

    Scouring genetic data on more than 72,000 individuals,

    Worrying can take a toll on your psyche, but new research suggests that when middle-aged men fret too much, they face a higher risk for developing diabetes, heart disease or stroke down the road.

    And this increase in risk is on par with the health risks linked to heavy drinking, the findings showed.

    <...

    What's good for the heart is good for the brain, and a new study suggests that connection might be especially critical for women.

    The study, of more than 1,800 adults in their 50s and 60s, found that those with heart disease, or risk factors for it, generally showed a greater decline in their memory and thinking skills over time.

    That was not a surprise, since past studies have reve...

    COVID-19 is now the third leading cause of death for Americans and has shortened life expectancy by nearly two years, a drop not seen since World War II, a new government report shows.

    Life expectancy dropped from 78.8 in 2010 to 77 in 2020 as the age-adjusted death rate increased 17%, going from 715 deaths per 100,000 people in 2019 to 835 deaths per 100,000 in 2020, researchers from th...

    Margarine has gotten a bad rap for years, but a U.S. ban on partially hydrogenated oils may have made it a healthier choice than butter, a new study suggests.

    Before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned such oils in 2018, margarine...

    They take care of others, but many U.S. home health care workers say they're not in good shape themselves, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed self-reported data collected from nearly 3,000 home health care workers in 38 states between 2014 and 2018 and found that more than a quarter rated their general health as fair or poor, 1 in 5 reported poor mental health, and 14% reported poor ...

    The COVID-19 pandemic, heart-healthy eating, and better ways to treat and prevent heart disease were among the hot topics that emerged during the American Heart Association's annual meeting this week.

    "I was at the sessions yesterday, I was actually in clinic this morning, and there were things I learned at the sessions that are affecting how I care for my patients," Dr. Manesh Patel, cha...

    Young, Black Americans are experiencing significant spikes in obesity, type 2 diabetes and smoking, all risk factors for heart attack and stroke.

    Between 2007 and 2017 -- before the COVID-19 pandemic and the concerns it has created -- hospitalized Black Americans aged 18 to 44 had sharp increases in these risks. They were also having higher rates of health complications and poor hospital ...