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Results for search "Alzheimer's".

29 Jun

4 Ways To Reduce Your Alzheimer’s Risk

Following a healthy lifestyle helps protect your brain and lower your risk of dementia

07 May

Eating A Mediterranean Diet Helps Prevent The Loss Of Brain Function, Study Finds

Following a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and olive oil may protect your brain against protein build-up and shrinkage related to Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

27 Jul

Two Common Vaccinations Appear To Lower The Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease

Both the flu and pneumonia vaccines may help protect against cognitive decline.

Health News Results - 201

Doctors Divided Over Use of Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug

The controversial new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm is creating something of a civil war in medicine, as health networks, hospitals, insurers and individual doctors weigh impending discussions with patients about whether they should take the medication.

Many doctors believe the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "moved the goalposts" to approve Aduhelm (aducanumab) in early June, and they aren'...

Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

FRIDAY, July 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already approved in the United States for treating hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson's.

The new study, publis...

1 in 20 Cases of Dementia Occurs in People Under 65

WEDNESDAY, July 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia is largely a disease of old age, but a new study finds that up to 5% of all cases are among people in the prime of their lives.

Looking at 95 international studies, researchers estimated that nearly 4 million people worldwide are living with young-onset dementia -- cases that strike between the ages of 30 and 64.

...

Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?

Women on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause go on to have a 58% lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions, a new study finds.

Although the study wasn't designed to prove cause and effect, the findings could point the way to new treatments for such diseases, according to the researchers.

"This is not the first study on the impact of hormone...

How Long Do People Want to Live?

What's better -- a long life or quality of life?

New research suggests that people balance both when thinking about their desired life span, and fears of suffering dementia or chronic pain in old age tend to limit how long they want to live.

"Dementia tops the list of conditions where people would prefer to live shorter lives -- which is a particular challenge given the rapid incr...

Two Major Health Systems Won't Administer Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug

Two major U.S. health systems say they will not administer the controversial new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm.

The decisions by the Cleveland Clinic and Mount Sinai's Health System in New York City are the latest fallout from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's widely criticized approval of the Biogen drug on June 7, The New York Times reported.

Many experts say there's no ...

Reading, Puzzles May Delay Alzheimer's by 5 Years: Study

THURSDAY, July 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- An active mind in old age may delay Alzheimer's disease by up to five years, a new study suggests.

Activities like reading, writing letters, playing cards or doing puzzles may prolong brain health even for those in their 80s, researchers say.

"The key element is that you're processing information," said lead researcher R...

Medicare Mulls Coverage for Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

TUESDAY, July 13, 2021 (Healthday News) -- Medicare launched a formal process on Monday that will determine whether the agency will cover Aduhelm, the newly approved Alzheimer's drug whose high price tag and unproven benefits have prompted widespread controversy.

Medicare's announcement came the same day that leaders of two House committees that are investigating Aduhelm's approval asked ...

FDA Head Asks for Investigation Into Alzheimer's Drug Approval

MONDAY, July 12, 2021 (Healthday News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's controversial approval of the Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm should be investigated by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), FDA Acting Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock has said.

The FDA approved Aduhelm even though an advisory panel of outside experts said there wasn't enough proof that the drug actually works. T...

New Prescribing Instructions Tighten Use of Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday issued new prescribing rules for the controversial Alzheimer's medication Aduhelm that will likely limit its use.

When first approved a month ago, the FDA said Biogen's monthly IV drug was for all Alzheimer's patients. The agency now says the drug is appropriate for patients with early or mild Alzheimer's but that it has not been studied i...

House Committees to Investigate New Alzheimer's Drug Approval

THURSDAY, July 1, 2021 (Healthday News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's controversial approval of a new Alzheimer's drug, along with its high price, is now being investigated by two House committees.

"We have serious concerns about the steep price of Biogen's new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm and the process that led to its approval despite questions about the drug's clinical benefi...

Keeping Same Nurse for All Home Health Care May Be Crucial for Dementia Patients

Dementia patients who have the same nurse for all of their home health care visits are a third less likely to be readmitted to the hospital, a new study finds.

"While continuity of nursing care may benefit every home health care patient, it may be particularly critical for people with dementia," said study co-author Chenjuan Ma. "Having the same person delivering care can increase familia...

Healthy Living Can Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease has no cure, but one expert says it may be possible to reduce the risks of developing the disease with healthy lifestyle changes.

There are two different types of Alzheimer's. Early-onset typically affects patients before age 65. Late-onset affects older adults.

"Early-onset dementia often is linked to genetics and can run in families," said Dr. Chen Zhao, a neur...

Most Cases of Dementia in U.S. Seniors Go Undiagnosed: Study

Most Americans with dementia are undiagnosed, which shows how important it is to screen and assess seniors for the disease, researchers say.

Their new analysis of data from a nationwide survey of about 6 million Americans aged 65 and older revealed that 91% of people with cognitive impairment consistent with dementia did not have a formal medical diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer's disea...

Lilly to Seek FDA Approval for New Alzheimer's Drug

FRIDAY, June 25, 2021 (Healthday News) -- Fresh on the heels of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of the controversial Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm, the maker of a second medicine that works in similar fashion said Thursday it hopes to apply for approval of its medication later this year.

Eli Lilly said findings from a mid-stage clinical trial of 272 patients with early Alzheim...

Autopsy Study Shows How COVID Harms the Brain

The brains of people who died from COVID-19 were remarkably similar to the brains of people who die from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, showing inflammation and disrupted circuitry, researchers report.

"The brains of patients who died from severe COVID-19 showed profound molecular markers of inflammation, even though those patients didn't have any reporte...

Good News, Bad News From Alzheimer's Vaccine Trial

An experimental Alzheimer's vaccine appears to safely clear abnormal tau protein from the brain, but it's not yet clear whether the shot will be able to save brain function.

In a Phase 2 clinical trial, the vaccine produced high levels of antibodies to target and attack free-floating tau proteins before they can form "tau tangles" that clog neurons and damage brain function. Tau tangles, ...

FDA Defends Approval of Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first new drug to treat Alzheimer's disease in nearly two decades, in a controversial decision that left the agency defending its reputation and its science.

Aduhelm (aducanumab) treats Alzheimer's by clearing out amyloid beta, a sticky protein known to form plaques in the brains of early-stage patients.

It is the first approved...

'Historic' Decision Expected on U.S. Approval of Alzheimer's Drug

The first drug ever shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease could be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday, but experts say that approval will be surrounded by controversy.

In clinical trials, aducanumab showed a 22% reduction in the development of thinking and memory problems associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a statement from the Alzheim...

There's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's Research

The U.S. government and nonprofits are replacing drug companies as the main drivers of Alzheimer's disease research, two new studies show.

The findings are from an analysis of national data by Jeffrey Cummings, a research professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Integrated Health Sciences.

In one study, his team found that the number of Alzheimer's clinical trials ...

Healthy Living Helps Prevent Dementia, Even If It Runs in the Family

For people worried about developing dementia due to their family history, a preliminary study offers some good news: A healthy lifestyle might curb your risk.

Researchers found that older adults with healthy habits had a lower risk of developing dementia, versus the less health-conscious -- even if a parent or sibling had suffered from the brain disease.

Lifestyle choices did not er...

Grief Can Strike Even Before a Loved One Is Gone

Feelings of grief are expected after the loss of a loved one, but having those feelings when your loved one has a terminal illness is also real and can fluctuate over time, experts say.

Individuals can adjust to their emotional pain, according to a new study focusing on what is known as "pre-loss grief" observed at two points in time for people whose family members had advanced can...

Eat Smart: Mediterranean Diet Could Ward Off Dementia

A diet rich in vegetables, fruits, olive oil and fish -- the so-called Mediterranean diet -- may protect the brain from plaque buildup and shrinkage, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Germany looked at the link between diet and the proteins amyloid and tau, which are a hallmark of Alzheimer's but are also found in the brains of older people without dementia.

"These results contr...

Higher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: Study

That college degree may be useful in many ways, but new research suggests it probably won't keep your brain from shrinking with age.

Over the years, a number of studies have suggested that education might buffer people against age-related declines in memory and thinking. But those findings did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

In the new study, researchers asked whether peo...

Head Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar Ways

Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury appear to affect the brain in similar ways, according to a study that may point to new ways to identify people at high risk for Alzheimer's.

"These findings are the first to suggest that cognitive impairment following a traumatic brain injury is useful for predicting the magnitude of Alzheimer's-like brain degradation," said study author Andr...

Your Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your Brain

Where you live could affect your brain health as you age, a new study claims.

Specifically, it found that middle-aged and older people in poorer neighborhoods showed more brain shrinkage and faster mental decline than those in affluent neighborhoods.

""Worldwide, dementia is a major cause of illness and a devastating diagnosis," said study author Dr. Amy Kind, of the University of W...

Research Shows Links Between Gum Disease and Alzheimer's

Don't forget to floss: New research adds to evidence linking gum disease with Alzheimer's disease.

The mouth is home to both harmful bacteria that promote inflammation and healthy, protective bacteria, the study authors explained.

In the new study, the researchers found that people who have more harmful than healthy gum bacteria were more likely to also have a protein marker for Al...

Assisted Living Centers Can Do More for Dementia Patients, Experts Say

U.S. assisted living facilities often have activities to keep seniors socially engaged -- but a new study says they need to ensure that residents with dementia are not left out.

Researchers observed residents and staff at four assisted living communities over the course of a year.

They found that a few factors stood out as key to keeping residents with dementia socially and mentally...

6 Steps to Reduce Caregiver Stress

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease can be mentally and physically exhausting, so you should take steps to manage and reduce stress, according to the Alzheimer's Foundation of America.

"Finding ways to manage and reduce stress is of paramount importance for every Alzheimer's caregiver. Untreated stress can lead to physical, mental and emotional caregiver burnout," Jennifer Ree...

Loneliness in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Alzheimer's

Middle-aged folks who feel persistently lonely appear to have a nearly doubled risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports.

If you take steps to counter your loneliness, however, you might actually reduce your dementia risk, the researchers found.

Dementia risk rose 91% in those who reported feelings of loneliness that persisted across two separate health...

'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

When people die some cells in their brains go on for hours, even getting more active and growing to gargantuan proportions, new research shows.

Awareness of this activity, spurred on by "zombie genes," could affect research into diseases that affect the brain.

For the study, researchers analyzed gene expression using fresh brain tissue collected during routine surgery and found that...

Exercise Boosts Blood Flow to Brain, Keeping it Sharp

Regular aerobic exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which may help slow mental decline in older adults, a new, small study suggests.

Researchers from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center looked at 70 men and women diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This means there are slight changes to the brain that affect memory, decision-making or reasoning skills. In m...

Suicide Attempts Spike Soon After Dementia Diagnosis

A new study shows just how devastating a diagnosis of mental decline can be: Researchers found that rates of suicide rise sharply in the months after such news is delivered.

The study of almost 148,000 older U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs patients, mostly men, looked at diagnoses for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is often (but not always) a precursor to dementia.

"Risk...

Unhealthy in Your 20s? Your Mind May Pay the Price Decades Later

If you're a 20-something who wants to stay sharp, listen up: A new study suggests poor health habits now may increase your risk of mental decline later in life.

Its authors say young adulthood may be the most critical time for adopting a healthy lifestyle in order to keep your brain sharp when you're older.

That's the upshot of an analysis of data from about 15,000 adults who were p...

Could a New Drug Help Ease Alzheimer's?

About 7 out of 10 Alzheimer's patients wound up free of the brain plaques that are a hallmark of the disease after treatment with a potentially breakthrough experimental drug, clinical trial results show.

The drug, donanemab, also significantly slowed the patients' brain decline, according to findings published March 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Donanemab diss...

Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

Black and Hispanic Americans already face higher risks for dementia than the general population. Many also believe they'd get worse dementia care compared to white patients, according to a new Alzheimer's Association special report.

Older Black Americans are about twice as likely to have Alzheimer's or another form of dementia as older white people, and older Hispanics are about 1.5 times...

Alzheimer's May Strike Women and Men in Different Ways

The ravages of Alzheimer's may strike later in women than men, but once it takes hold women tend to deteriorate far faster than men, according to a new study.

Something known as cognitive reserve helps the aging brain function better for longer, and researchers report that women appear to have more of it than men. But once the reserve runs out, mental decline in women speeds up.

"Wo...

History of Mental Illness Tied to Earlier Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

People with Alzheimer's disease often have a history of depression or anxiety, which might mean an earlier emergence of memory and thinking problems, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that of 1,500 Alzheimer's patients at their center, 43% had a history of depression, while almost one-third had a history of anxiety disorders.

Those patients also tended to be diagnosed ...

Why Some 'Super Ager' Folks Keep Their Minds Dementia-Free

Researchers may have uncovered a key reason some people remain sharp as a tack into their 80s and 90s: Their brains resist the buildup of certain proteins that mark Alzheimer's disease.

The study focused on what scientists have dubbed "super agers" -- a select group of older folks who have the memory performance of people decades younger.

Compared with older people who had average b...

AHA News: Black, Hispanic Families Hit Hardest by Dementia

It can begin with the occasional missed bill payment. An inability to remember names. Telling the same story repeatedly. There may be personality changes or mood swings. Confusion. Over time, it's as if the person who once was slowly disappears.

Dementia. As the population ages, a growing number of families face this debilitating condition, which can be both emotionally and financially ex...

Dementia Seen in Younger Adults Shows Even More Brain Damage Than Alzheimer's

White matter damage in the brains of adults with frontotemporal dementia is even greater than that seen in Alzheimer's disease patients, a new study shows.

Frontotemporal dementia often affects people younger than 65, mainly causing personality and behavior changes and problems with language, rather than memory. The researchers assessed areas of brain damage called white matter hyperinten...

What Causes Herpes Cold Sore Flare-Ups? New Study Offers Clues

Scientists may have discovered why cold sores caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) are triggered by stress, illness and sunburn.

The finding could lead to new ways to prevent recurring cold sores and herpes-related eye disease, U.S. and British researchers say.

More than half of Americans are infected with herpes simplex virus. It is spread through close contact with someone wh...

'Prediabetes' May Be Harming Your Brain, Study Finds

"Prediabetes" -- where blood sugar levels are high but not yet tipped over into full-blown diabetes -- may pose a threat to brain health, new British research suggests.

"As an observational study, it cannot prove higher blood sugar levels cause worsening brain health. However, we believe there is a potential connection that needs to be investigated further," said study lead author Victori...

Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

Although Alzheimer's disease is a devastating diagnosis that is better delivered earlier rather than later, new research suggests poor patients living in rural areas may not have access to the specialists who could spot the first signs of memory declines.

The team from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., led by Sayeh Nikpay, now an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota...

If Blood Pressure Rises at Night, Alzheimer's Risk Might Rise, Too

Older men whose blood pressure rises at night may be at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Blood pressure changes over 24 hours. It typically goes up during the day and dips at nighttime. But some people have an opposite pattern, which is called reverse dipping.

"The night is a critical period for brain health. For example, in animals, it has previously be...

Tony Bennett's Struggle With Alzheimer's Revealed

As Tony Bennett releases what may well be his last album, his family has disclosed that the 1950s crooner who became popular with younger audiences decades later has Alzheimer's disease.

His wife, Susan, made the announcement in an interview published in AARP magazine. She said Bennett, 94, is content and happy and took the diagnosis calmly.

"But that's because he already d...

Fluid-Filled Spaces in the Brain Linked to Worsening Memory: Study

Enlarged spaces in the brain that fill with fluid around small blood vessels may be a harbinger of impending dementia, a new Australian study suggests.

Typically, these so-called perivascular spaces help clear waste and toxins from the brain and might be linked with changes in the aging brain, researchers say.

"Dilated perivascular spaces, which are a common MRI finding, especi...

COVID Vaccine Advised for Alzheimer's Patients, Their Caregivers

All Alzheimer's disease patients and their family caregivers should be vaccinated against COVID-19, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America says.

"Getting vaccinated is one of the most important steps families affected by Alzheimer's disease can take to protect themselves and their loved ones," said Dr. J. Wesson Ashford, chair of the foundation's medical, scientific and memory screening ad...

Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But Without Memory Loss

A rare brain disease that causes loss of language skills doesn't lead to memory loss, a new study finds.

The condition is called primary progressive aphasia and about 40% of people who have it have underlying Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers. Their study was published online Jan. 13 in the journal Neurology.

"While we knew that the memories of people with prima...

How Are 'Super Agers' Protected From Alzheimer's and Mental Decline?

Some older folks are still sharp as tacks and dementia-free well into their 80s and beyond. Now German researchers have uncovered a possible reason why: Their genes may help them fend off protein build-up in the brain.

The finding is based on a study of brain images of 94 participants, all aged 80 or older. They were characterized by the amount of tau protein tangles and beta-amyloid prot...

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