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Results for search "Alzheimer's".

13 Jan

Just 6 Minutes of Intense Exercise May Protect Your Brain from Alzheimer’s, New Study Finds

Short bouts of high intensity exercise boost production of a protein that’s key to learning and memory, researchers say.

24 Mar

High Cholesterol In Your 30s Could Raise Future Alzheimer’s Risk, Study Finds

People with high cholesterol at 35 face higher odds of Alzheimer’s disease later in life, researchers say.

Health News Results - 339

Wintertime Wandering: A Real Danger for People With Alzheimer's

Winter weather can add a layer of danger to the wandering behavior common in people with dementia.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) offers some suggestions to help prevent wandering and prepare folks to react quickly if it occurs.

“During the winter, it’s especially important for families living in areas affected by cold weather, snow and ice,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 27, 2023
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  • Women, Keep Moving to Help Keep Mental Decline at Bay

    A lot of people wear watches that count their every step as they try to move more.

    Now, a new study finds that getting more of those steps each day, along with moderate-to-vigorous physical exercise, could cut the risk of dementia and thinking impairments for women.

    For women aged 65 or older, each additional 31 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associat...

    Home Workouts Help Your Brain, But Group Exercise May Be Even Better

    A good physical workout benefits an older brain. So does socializing. Put those two together and the payoff may be even bigger.

    Researchers in Japan found that link in a new study that looked at exercising solo and in a group.

    "Exercise is manageable for many older people, and we saw cognitive benefits from it compared with those who don't exercise," said study senior author

    Initial Symptoms Could Predict How Fast Alzheimer's Progresses

    Memory loss is the most common symptom associated with Alzheimer’s disease — the terrifying prospect of slowly forgetting yourself and everything around you.

    But people who exhibit memory loss early on in their dementia actually have a slower rate of decline than those who develop other symptoms earlier, a

    Could Hearing Aids Lower Your Odds for Dementia?

    Could losing your hearing as you age be a harbinger of dementia?

    Maybe, suggests new research that found that older people who had trouble hearing were more likely to develop dementia down the road. But there's good news with the bad: Hearing aids — which are now available over-the-counter at much lower prices — may reduce this risk.

    “There is evidence that hearing loss c...

    Social Isolation Can Raise Odds for Dementia

    Social isolation is a substantial risk factor for dementia in older adults, according to a pair of studies that add evidence to past research on this threat.

    But these new studies offer a potential solution: using technology to encourage older adults to text and email to stay in touch.

    Although the studies don’t prove lack of regular social contact causes dementia, researchers sai...

    Could 6 Minutes of Exercise Help Shield Your Brain From Alzheimer's?

    Six minutes of high-intensity exercise might prolong the lifespan of a healthy brain, perhaps delaying the start of Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s diseases, a new, small study suggests.

    Researchers found that short but intense cycling increased the production of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is essential for brain formation, learning and memory. It's tho...

    New Year: Time for Your Memory Screening Appointment

    Many conditions cause memory issues, and early detection is essential for effective treatment, according to a national Alzheimer’s disease organization.

    The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) encourages people to get a memory screening in the new year.

    The foundation offers free, confidential virtual memory screenings. It doesn’t set a minimum age and there are no insura...

    FDA Approves Second Alzheimer’s Drug, Despite Safety Concerns

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a second Alzheimer's drug, lecanemab, despite reports of rare brain bleeds linked to use of the drug in some patients.

    However, the FDA pointed to the drug's benefits, as well.

    “Alzheimer’s disease immeasurably incapacitates the lives of those who suffer from it and has devastating effects on their loved ones,” Dr. Bill...

    Patients, Doctors Await FDA Decision on Experimental Alzheimer’s Drug

    Lecanemab: It's an experimental medication that's been shown in trials to slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s disease.

    It's also up for accelerated approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, with a decision expected by Jan. 6.

    However, the drug has also been linked to two deaths from brain bleeds among people who’ve used it in trials, so safety concerns c...

    Congressional Report Slams FDA, Drugmaker Over Approval of Alzheimer's Drug Aduhelm

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval process for the controversial Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm was "rife with irregularities," despite lingering doubts about the power of the pricey medication to slow the disease down, a Congressional report released Thursday claims.

    Actions the agency took with Biogen, maker of Aduhelm, "raise serious concerns about FDA's lapses in protocol," th...

    Time Spent in Nature Appears to Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's

    Living in an area with easy access to parks and rivers appears to slow the progression of devastating neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

    That's the conclusion of a new study based on more than a decade and a half tracking disease risk among ...

    Hints That Deep Brain Stimulation Might Ease Alzheimer's Symptoms

    Researchers are studying whether deep brain stimulation could help people with Alzheimer's hold on to their memory longer, and now a new finding may help refine the approach.

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for several medical conditions, including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It involves implanting electrodes in certain areas o...

    Stranded Dolphins' Brains Show Alzheimer's-Like Changes

    Groups of whales, dolphins and porpoises are regularly stranded in shallow waters around the coasts of the United Kingdom.

    Researchers wanted to understand why, so they studied the brains of 22 toothed whales — or "odontocetes" — that were stranded in Scottish coastal waters.

    The study includ...

    Make the Holidays Comforting for Loved Ones With Alzheimer's

    Those who have dementia can find the holiday season disorienting, but their loved ones can help.

    "The holiday season can be both joyful and stressful for all of us, especially individuals living with a dementia-related illness," said Jennifer Reeder, director of educational and social se...

    Vitamin D Might Help Shield the Aging Brain

    Older adults who harbor more vitamin D in their brains may stay mentally sharper, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that when older adults had higher levels of vitamin D in their brain tissue, they tended to perform better on standard tests of memory and thinking. They were also less likely to have dementia or milder cognitive impairments.

    Experts stressed that

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 8, 2022
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  • Seizures Seem Tied to Faster Decline in People With Dementia

    Dementia patients who suffer from seizures tend to decline faster and die younger, according to a new study that urges caregivers to watch for these sudden brain changes.

    "Our hope is that controlling seizures by prescribing antiseizure medications to these patients will slow down the progression of cognitive impairment," said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 2, 2022
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  • Experimental Alzheimer's Drug May Slow Decline, But Safety Concerns Linger

    The experimental Alzheimer's drug lecanemab slowed thinking declines among patients suffering the early stages of the disease in a new study, but safety concerns about brain swelling and brain bleeds remain.

    In the eagerly awaited trial findings, published Tuesday in the New England...

    Second Death in Trial of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Is Raising Concerns

    Two people have now died from brain hemorrhages that may be linked to an experimental Alzheimer's drug, calling into question the medication's safety.

    A 65-year-old woman with early-stage Alzheimer's recently died from a massive brain bleed that some researchers link to lecanemab, an antibody drug designed to bind to and remove amyloid-beta from the brain, according to a report published ...

    Science Reveals Links Between Down Syndrome & Alzheimer's

    The genetic abnormality that drives Down syndrome causes the same sort of abnormal brain plaques and protein tangles that are found in Alzheimer's disease patients, a new study reports.

    Amyloid beta plaques and tau tangles have long been associated with Alzheimer's disease, and they're also evident in most people with Down syndrome by age 40, researchers note.

    These plaques and tan...

    Alzheimer's Experts Offer Tips for 'Dementia-Friendly' Homes

    While most homes aren't designed to be dementia-friendly, they can easily be adapted, according to a national Alzheimer's disease group.

    "Virtually every aspect of a home can affect the person's quality of life," said Charles Fuschillo Jr., president and CEO of the Alzheimer's Fo...

    Dementia Rate Declining Among Older Americans: Study

    There's good news for aging adults: Prevalence of dementia declined in the United States from 2000 to 2016, a new study reveals.

    In people ages 65 and up, prevalence of dementia dropped by 3.7 percentage points. Disparities also decreased between white and Black men and between men and women.

    "The ...

    Clinical Trials Could Help Stop Alzheimer's. But Who Will Join Them?

    New drugs that could slow or prevent the start of dementia would be groundbreaking, but a new poll suggests many middle-aged adults may be reluctant to take part in the studies that test those medications.

    Only about 12% of the roughly 1,000 people aged 50 to 64 who were surveyed said they're very likely to step forward to test a new dementia drug, according to the National Poll on Health...

    Common Blood Pressure Drug Might Prevent Alzheimer's in Black Patients

    A new study has shown the blood pressure drug telmisartan may offer new hope as an Alzheimer's treatment in Black patients. It did not show the same benefit in white people.

    Learning how people from different ethnic groups respond to the same drug could be key in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. Even though Black people are more likely than white folks to develop th...

    Half of Americans Over 50 Are Now Caregivers

    More than half of Americans aged 50 and up are helping an older adult manage tasks ranging from household chores to care for medical conditions, a new national poll shows.

    Researchers said the findings highlight the critical ro...

    Get a Free Memory Screening From the Alzheimer's Foundation This November

    Early detection of memory issues is important.

    It can help rule in or out a variety of health issues, including vitamin deficiency, thyroid condition, sleep apnea, urinary tract infection and, of course, Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    The Alzheimer's Foundation of America suggests getting scr...

    Halloween Can Be a Scary Time for People With Dementia. Here's How to Help

    When there are suddenly creepy decorations and lots of knocks at the door from strangers, Halloween can be frightening for someone living with dementia.

    It is possible to keep a loved one living with the disease calm and safe, while also including that family member in celebrating the holiday quietly, ...

    1 in 10 U.S. Seniors Has Dementia; Minorities Hit Hardest

    One in 10 older Americans has dementia, and twice as many have mild mental impairment, a new study finds.

    As the nation's population grows older, the burden on families and society is likely to grow, and minorities will be affected most, experts say.

    "As the population in the U.S. ages, it is projected that there will be more cases of cognitive impairment, unless and until effective...

    Certain Class of Diabetes Meds Could Cut Dementia Risk

    An older class of type 2 diabetes drugs known as thiazolidinediones, or TZDs, may protect you from dementia down the road, according to new research.

    Thiazolidinediones, also known as glitazones, cut dementia risk by 22% among folks at high risk who also had mild or moderate type 2 diabetes when they took these me...

    Study Casts Doubt on Mediterranean Diet's Benefit to Brain

    A healthy diet might not protect you from dementia as some have suggested, according to a new Swedish study.

    The Mediterranean diet — which includes lots of vegetables, fruits, fish and healthy fats and little dairy or meat — has been touted as brain-protective. Bu...

    Mouse Study Points to Why Alzheimer's Affects Women More Than Men

    Women are diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease twice as often as men. Now researchers think they know why.

    A new study found evidence in mice and human brain tissue that may explain the differences, according to researchers from Case Western University in Cleveland.

    Female brains showed a higher ...

    Scientists Propose New Mechanism Driving Alzheimer's Disease

    Amyloid-beta plaques have long been linked to Alzheimer's disease, with some scientists theorizing that the plaques actually cause the degenerative brain disease.

    But a new study suggests that the plaques are actually a symptom of what's going on in the brain, rather than the cause of Alzheimer's.

    ...

    Suicide Risk Rises Sharply in People Diagnosed With Early-Onset Dementia

    Thoughts of suicide are often a first reaction to a diagnosis of dementia before age 65, a new study suggests.

    Suicide risk is highest in the first three months after the dementia diagnosis and if the patient already has a psychiatric disorder, British researchers found. For those younger...

    Minority Patients Less Likely to Get Newer Alzheimer's Meds

    While certain minority groups are more likely to be diagnosed with dementia than their white counterparts, they may also be less likely to be eligible for new disease-slowing treatments, a new study finds.

    Cognitive, or mental, impairment in Black, Hispanic and Asian patients is more likely to be caused by forms of dementia unrelated to the

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 4, 2022
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  • Alzheimer's Meds Are Mostly Tested in Whites. That Worries Black Patients, Caregivers

    Larry Griner resigned from his job in California and moved back to his childhood home in Baltimore nearly five years ago so he could care for his mother, Norma.

    She had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease almost 12 y...

    Longevity Calculator Could Aid Planning After Dementia Diagnosis

    How long can someone newly diagnosed with dementia expect to live?

    It's a tough question but definitely one that many family members and friends grapple with after a loved one is diagnosed with dementia and begins to decline. Now, a new sta...

    New Alzheimer's Drug Shows Promise in Phase 3 Clinical Trial

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2022 (HealthDay) -- Japanese drugmaker Eisai on Wednesday said its experimental drug lecanemab helped slow thinking declines among people in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    The findings from a phase 3 clinical trial have yet to be peer-reviewed in any medical journal. But accor...

    Lots of Nightmares in Middle Age Might Be Warning Sign of Dementia

    No one likes nightmares, but having persistently bad dreams may also signal impending dementia, new British research suggests.

    In the study, people aged 35 to 64 who had bad dreams weekly were four times more likely to have

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 22, 2022
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  • COVID Appears to Raise Risk for Alzheimer's Disease

    COVID-19 infection may significantly boost an older person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new, large-scale study suggests.

    People 65 and older who contracted COVID were nearly 70% more likely overall to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's within a year of their infection, researchers report. Th...

    Multivitamins Linked to Healthier Brains in Old Age

    A daily multivitamin might help keep your brain free from any decline in thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    In a trial of more than 21,000 men and women, the study authors reported that

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 14, 2022
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  • Unhealthy Gums Could Up Your Odds for Dementia

    Gum disease has far-reaching effects and may increase your odds of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

    In a review of 47 previously published studies, researchers in Finland found that tooth loss, deep pockets around teeth in the gums, or bone loss in the tooth sockets was tied to a 21% higher risk of dementia and a 23% higher risk of

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 12, 2022
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  • Music: Bridging Memories for People With Alzheimer's

    Wes Mika started out on drums, but in his heart he was a tambourine man.

    “He got fascinated by the little silver discs on the tambourine,” said his wife, Susan Mika. “Sometimes he would hit the tambourine with the little mallets of the drum. He just he loved that tambourine.”

    Wes, 77, has dementia and lives in a memory care facility in Arlington Heights, Ill., a northwest su...

    How 'This Is Us' Put Alzheimer's Care in the Spotlight

    When the wildly popular TV show “This Is Us” wrapped up its final season this year, it did so with a storyline that showed one of the lead characters dealing with Alzheimer's disease as her adult children disagreed over the type of care she should receive.

    Now, a new online survey of more than 700...

    Alzheimer's: Who Is Caring for the Caregivers?

    Katherine Sanden drove over 1,400 miles, from California to Nebraska, to care for her beloved uncle after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in November 2020, but seeing him after years apart was more devastating than she could have ever imagined.

    Like Sanden, many family caregivers are thrown into t...

    Rural Americans With Early Alzheimer's Find It Tough to See Specialists

    Rural Americans with early-onset Alzheimer's disease are less likely than city dwellers to see a specialist and undergo tests that can help them and their families manage, new research reveals.

    While most Alzheimer's patients are over 65, about 6% develop the disease between the ages of 30 and 65. Typically, their mental decline is faster and more pronounced than that of older folks.

    ...

    Lifestyle May Be Key to Helping You Avoid Dementia

    Socializing, taking classes and exercising may boost your brain's cognitive reserve and stave off memory and thinking problems down the road, a new study suggests.

    Cognitive reserve refers to the brain's ability to withstand the effects of diseases like Alzheimer's and not show signs of de...

    Experiences of Racism Tied to Worsening Memory, Thinking in Older Black Americans

    Black and Hispanic Americans are more likely than others to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and new research suggests that racism is a contributor.

    Experiences of structural, interpersonal and institutional

    Rapid Loss of Smell May Be Alzheimer's Precursor

    Could the future of dementia screening include a test of a person's sense of smell?

    It may, suggests a new study that found the decline in a person's sense of smell could predict their loss of mental function and warn of structural changes in the brain that are important in Alzheimer's d...

    Even Chores, Socializing Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

    Your daily walk, cleaning the house and lunch with friends could together be keys to staving off dementia, according to researchers.

    A new study looked at lifestyle habits that could help lower risks, instead of factors that may contribute to the disease.

    Researchers in China combed t...

    Diets Heavy in 'Ultra-Processed' Foods Could Harm the Brain

    Eating lots of ultra-processed foods may dramatically increase your risk for dementia, according to a new study by researchers in China.

    Ultra-processed foods are high in sugar, fat and salt, but low in protein and fiber. Sodas, salty and sugary snacks and desserts, ice cream, sausage, deep-fried chicken, flavored yogurt, ketchup, mayonnaise, packaged bread and flavored cereals are all ex...

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