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Aspirin has long been taken by heart patients to reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack, but a new study suggests that it can also guard against cardiovascular trouble in pneumonia patients.

Such complications are common in pneumonia patients and strongly associated with a long-term risk of death.

The study assessed whether aspirin could reduce the risk of heart attack and ische...

Many older adults are still taking a daily baby aspirin to ward off first-time heart problems -- despite guidelines that now discourage it, a new study finds.

Researchers found that one-half to 62% of U.S. adults aged 70 and up were using low-dose aspirin to cut their risk of heart disease or stroke. And aspirin use was common even among those with no history of cardiovascular disease -- ...

When it comes to taking a daily aspirin to cut heart patients' risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study finds dosing doesn't matter.

Researchers looked at more than 15,000 heart disease patients at 40 health centers across the United States who took either 81 milligrams (mg) or 325 mg of daily aspirin for a median of 26.2 months.

Though there were no significant differences betw...

It may not be a good idea to take a daily low-dose aspirin if you're also taking a widely used class of blood thinners called direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), researchers caution.

DOACs include drugs such as Eliquis (apixaban), Pradaxa (dabigatran), Lixiana (edoxaban) and Xarelto (rivaroxaban). They're used to help prevent strokes from atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of what's...

New research offers insight into why regular, long-term use of low-dose aspirin may reduce the risk of death from colon and rectal cancers.

Resarchers found that aspirin prevents blood cells called platelets from producing an enzyme that allows them to clump together. Tumor cells can attach to these clumps and spread (metastasize) throughout the body.

"Aspirin inhibits platelet act...

Could something as simple as taking a low-dose aspirin once a day guard against pregnancy loss among women who have already suffered miscarriages?

New research suggests that's the case, though exactly how low-dose aspirin helps stave off miscarriages is not fully understood yet.

But "aspirin is anti-inflammatory and in a certain subset of women, miscarriage may be the result of an u...

Low-dose aspirin may help some people curb their risk of developing colon cancer -- but not if they wait until age 70 to start, a large, new study suggests.

Researchers found that when people began using aspirin in their 50s or 60s, their risk of developing colon cancer after age 70 was trimmed by 20%.

There was no such benefit, however, among people who began using aspirin at age 7...

Certain nutrients, foods and medicines may help protect you against colon cancer, a large research review suggests.

A team of international researchers led by Dr. Marc Bardou, of Dijon Bourgogne University Hospital in France, reviewed about 80 studies that examined how diet and certain medicines affected colon cancer risk. The studies were published between September 1980 and June 201...

Taking a daily low-dose aspirin may speed the progression of cancer in the elderly, a new clinical trial shows.

Daily aspirin doubled the risk that a person 70 or older would die from a stage 3 cancer, and increased the death risk associated with stage 4 cancers by nearly a third, according to data from more than 19,000 older people in the United States and Australia.

Older ...

It's a myth that heart attacks are a "man's disease." Yet a new research review confirms that women remain less likely than men to get medications routinely recommended for preventing heart trouble and strokes.

Researchers found that across 43 international studies, a general pattern emerged: Women with risk factors for heart disease and stroke were less likely than men to be prescrib...

Low-dose aspirin may reduce the risk of several types of digestive tract cancers, according to a team of researchers in Europe.

For the new study, the researchers analyzed 113 studies investigating colon/rectal ("bowel"), head and neck, esophageal, stomach, liver, gallbladder, bile duct and pancreatic cancers in the general population. The studies were published up to 2019.

...

Millions of Americans pop a low-dose aspirin each day to help ward off heart issues, but a new study finds that protection may not extend to dementia.

Although the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin have been touted as protection against thinking and memory (or "cognitive") problems from Alzheimer's and other dementias, a large, randomized trial suggests aspirin won't slow mental de...

People with hepatitis B or C are at greater risk for liver cancer, but a low-dose aspirin a day might significantly lower that risk, a new study suggests.

Over a median of nearly eight years of follow-up, 4% of those taking low-dose aspirin developed liver cancer, compared with 8.3% of those not taking the drug, researchers found.

"It's not clear how aspirin works ...

When someone close to you dies, grief can literally break your heart, but two common medicines may help prevent a heart attack.

"While almost everyone loses someone they love during their lifetime and grief is a natural reaction, this stressful time can be associated with an increased risk of heart attack," said Dr. Geoffrey Tofler, a professor of preventive cardiology at the Univers...

A daily baby aspirin helped first-time mothers lower their chances of delivering too soon in a new clinical trial, though it's not clear the practice should become routine everywhere.

The trial, which was run in six lower-income countries, found that giving first-time mothers a daily low-dose aspirin reduced their risk of preterm birth by 11%. Their chances of a very early delive...

The scourge of addiction among Americans young and old made big headlines in 2019, as did one big change in heart health guidelines.

Here are the top health stories of the past year, as compiled by editors at HealthDay.

Vaping takes hold, and new dangers emerge

Perhaps no health issue dominated headlines this past year as m...

The daily use of low-dose aspirin against heart disease may have taken another knock.

New research shows that the practice may not provide black Americans with any lowering of their heart attack risk.

Researchers analyzed 11 years of data from more than 65,000 people, ages 40-79, living in the American Southeast. More than two-thirds of the participants were black, and about...

A cheap, century-old drug in most Americans' medicine cabinets -- aspirin -- may come to the rescue for people suffering from migraines, a new study finds.

While there are effective prescription medications, many migraine patients in the United States don't have access to them due to limited access to doctors or good insurance, or high insurance co-pays, sa...

Daily low-dose aspirin might reduce your risk of dying from cancer, particularly if you've packed on a few extra pounds, researchers say.

Taking aspirin three or more times a week is associated with a lower risk of cancer death as well as death for any reason, a new study reports.

Aspirin's protective effect appears particularly pronounced among people who are overweight -- ...

More teens are attempting suicide by overdosing on drugs, and new research suggests they are often turning to over-the-counter (OTC) medications like ibuprofen and aspirin in their efforts.

Antidepressants, antipsychotics and antihistamines were also common choices, the researchers added.

"What we were seeing was youth increasing suicide attempts using medications readily av...

With so much attention focused on the dangers of opioid painkillers, it's easy to forget that even "safe" over-the-counter products carry some dangers.

If you don't think twice about reaching for a pill to relieve aches and pains, especially medicines called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, you need to know about the wide-ranging cautions surrounding their use, especi...

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose aspirin may improve survival odds for patients battling head/neck and lung cancer, two new studies suggest.

The first reviewed data on 460 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) or early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

That study concluded that taking a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug su...

Debate over the benefits and drawbacks of daily low-dose aspirin has flared in recent years, with guidelines now generally urging against the regimen to prevent a first heart attack or stroke in healthy people.

But some people with good heart health still might benefit from taking daily low-dose aspirin, a new study from New Zealand argues.

About 2.5% of women and 12%...

Taking aspirin or anti-clotting medicines like Plavix won't boost the risk of another stroke if you've already survived a bleeding stroke, a new study suggests.

In fact, they might even help guard against a second brain bleed, the researchers noted.

The findings "are reassuring for survivors of brain hemorrhage who need to take antiplatelet [anti-clotting] medicines to preve...

Let's say you're one of the millions of older adults who takes a low-dose aspirin religiously, in the belief that it will guard against heart disease and heart attacks.

Now, a new review suggests your risk of a brain bleed outweighs any heart benefit that a daily aspirin might bring you.

Researchers said the findings support a recent change to guidelines on low-dose aspirin:...

Heart patients who get a stent to prop open a blocked artery are typically put on a powerful anti-clotting drug and aspirin for a full year after their procedure.

Now, new research suggests these patients can safely drop the aspirin regimen after just three months, and lower their bleeding risk in the process.

"Even though this treatment strategy needs to be confirmed in oth...

Millions of aging Americans worried about heart attacks and strokes have for years popped a low-dose aspirin each day, thinking the blood thinner might lower their risk.

But new guidelines issued Sunday by two cardiology groups say that, for most adults, the practice may no longer be warranted.

The new heart health guidelines were issued jointly by the American College of Ca...

Will an aspirin a day keep prostate cancer at bay?

Not necessarily, according to new research.

Danish scientists say low-dose aspirin doesn't seem to reduce a man's risk of death from prostate cancer, but it may slow down the disease in some cases.

For patients with slow-growing, non-aggressive cancer, aspirin did appear to stop the cancer from progressing. A slig...

Many Americans take a daily low-dose aspirin to protect their hearts. Now it appears aspirin may also reduce flare-ups of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

In a study of COPD sufferers, researchers found that aspirin was linked to fewer moderate exacerbations, but not severe bouts, of the lung disease. It also reduced moderate and severe episodes of labored breathing.

People with colon polyps spotted during screening are at higher risk for colon cancer. But while low-dose aspirin could lower the odds for the disease, too few patients adopt the regimen, new research shows.

Advanced colon polyps are a major risk factor for colon cancer, the third most common cause of cancer death in the United States.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Forc...

Daily low-dose aspirin is recommended for heart attack survivors or people at increased risk, but up to now experts have discouraged the practice for aging individuals in good health.

Now, a new evidence review suggests that some healthy seniors and middle-aged adults might gain a bit of benefit from taking daily aspirin.

Low-dose aspirin decreases the risk of heart attack a...