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1 in 10 Teens Have Sexted, Many See Porn by 6th Grade: Study

A high number of preteens and teens in the United States have viewed pornography and many have also sent or received nude or seminude photos -- sexting -- over their smartphones, a new study reveals.

“The prevalence rates we found in this study suggest that school counselors must be prepared to talk about sexting and pornography use with students, and to change the narrative about the...

As Alcohol Abuse Declines Among Teens, Marijuana Abuse Soars

American kids are drinking to excess less and abusing marijuana more, a new study finds.

Marijuana abuse among 6- to 18-year-olds has increased 245% since 2000, while child alcohol abuse has steadily declined over those years, say researchers who analyzed poisonings over two decades.

"This dramatic increase does coincide with this huge wave of decriminalization in the U.S.," s...

For Kids, Mental Trauma From Gun Injury Far Exceeds That of Car Crashes

Firearm injuries traumatize children, saddling them with mental health issues that include stress disorders and drug or alcohol use, according to a new study.

In all, 35% of kids injured by firearms receive a new mental health diagnosis in the following year, the

'Virtual' Driver Program Could Make Driving Safer for Teens With ADHD

A simulator may make driving safer for teens with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder by training them to take shorter glances away from the roadway.

Focused Concentration and Attention Learning (FOCAL) is a computer-based program that teaches teens to keep their eyes on the road. For this study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, a driving simulator was added to give ...

Valium, Xanax Prescriptions Could Raise Overdose Risk in Youth

Teenagers and young adults who use benzodiazepines to treat insomnia may be at heightened risk of overdose, a new study finds.

Benzodiazepines include anxiety medications like Ativan, Klonopin, Valium and Xanax, as well as prescription sleep aids such as estazolam (ProSom), triazolam (Halcion) and temazepam (Restoril).

In the

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 29, 2022
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  • Lots of Teen Boys Use Steroids, Often With Side Effects

    Steroid users, especially teen boys and young men, seem indifferent to the serious side effects and dependency associated with use of the drugs, a new study finds.

    “We're seeing more young adults and adolescent boys engaging in risk behaviors, such as the use of steroids, to achieve what many see as the ideal male body,” said lead author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 28, 2022
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  • Mental Health Care Shortage Could Play Role in U.S. Youth Suicides

    The kids aren't alright.

    Up to 1 in 5 children in the United States has a mental health condition, but only about half of those who need mental health care are now receiving it. What's more, suicide is the second leading cause of death among U.S. kids and teens, and youth suicide rates have been rising over the last decade.

    Now, about one year after the U.S. Surgeon General cit...

    Words Can Wound When Parents Talk to Kids About Obesity

    With U.S. health officials calling childhood obesity a public health crisis, conversations about weight are important. But what you say to your kids can be challenging, and even counterproductive, a new study found.

    "Body weight is a sensitive issue and the way we talk about it matters," said lead author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 21, 2022
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  • Over a Billion Young People Could Lose Hearing Due to Earbuds, Loud Concerts

    More than a billion young people are at risk for hearing loss because of listening to loud music at concerts and using earbuds and other personal listening devices, a new study suggests.

    “There is an urgent need for governments, industry, and civil society to prioritize global hearing loss prevention by promoting safe listening practices,” the study authors said in a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 16, 2022
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  • LGBTQ Youth Have Double the Risk for Suicidal Thoughts, Attempts

    A new study that looks at suicide risk among U.S. teens who are lesbian, gay and bisexual finds they have disproportionately high rates of suicidal thoughts, planning and attempts compared to their heterosexual peers.

    “The major message of this paper is that among a group of survivors of these types of violence, those who identify as a sexual minority are more likely to develop suicidal...

    Illinois Study Shows Big Jump in Suicide-Linked ER Visits by Teens

    Illinois has seen a recent surge in the number of kids arriving in the emergency room for suicidal thoughts -- both during and shortly before the pandemic, according to a new study.

    Among kids ages 5 to 19, ER visits for suicidal thoughts rose by 59% across the state between 2016 and 2021, researchers found. That included a sharp spike in the fall of 2019, followed by another in the fall ...

    More Teens Are Getting Weight Loss Surgery, If Families Can Afford It

    A growing number of U.S. teenagers are undergoing weight-loss surgery, but the figures suggest many still lack access to the procedures -- especially underinsured Black and Hispanic kids.

    That's the conclusion of a new study charting trends in bariatric (weight-loss) surgery among U.S. teens. Researchers found that between 2010 and 2017, the annual rate of the procedures doubled among kid...

    Binge Eating Disorder Looks Different in Brains of Boys and Girls

    The brains of girls and boys who have binge eating disorder show key differences, according to a new study.

    That's an important finding, researchers say, because both genders struggle with eating disorders, yet treatments are mainly targeted at girls.

    "Males have been excluded from rese...

    Over 3 Million U.S. School Kids Now Vaping or Smoking

    Despite continued efforts by health advocates and U.S. public health officials, a huge number of middle and high school students are still using addictive tobacco products, most often vaping products.

    A new study released by two federal agencies on Thursday estimated a total of 3.08 million ...

    More U.S. Teens Are Getting Heavily Addicted to Vaping

    More American youth than ever are so addicted to e-cigarettes that they vape within 5 minutes of waking up in the morning, a new analysis shows.

    While that percentage was around just 1% in 2017, it increased every year after that. It reached 10.3% by 2021, researchers reported.

    "The increasing intensity of use of modern e-cigarettes highlights the clinical need to address youth addi...

    Pregnancy Is Most Dangerous for the Very Young

    When preteen children or very young teenagers become pregnant, they face higher rates of complications and a greater risk of winding up in the intensive care unit than older teens do, a new study finds.

    The question about what happens when a young girl goes through pregnancy and delivery takes on more relevance after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June and subsequent abo...

    Brain Waves Could Help Guide Concussion Diagnosis, Treatment

    A particular brain wave may help diagnose concussions in high school football players and predict when it's safe for them to return to play, new research suggests.

    Delta waves are markers of brain injury and perhaps healing. They tend to decrease with age, but researchers found increased levels of these lo...

    New TikTok Trend of Mouth Taping During Sleep Carries Dangers

    A new trend promoted on the social media platform TikTok has people taping their lips shut at bedtime -- a practice that could be dangerous, an expert warns.

    The purpose of mouth taping is to keep from breathing through your mouth at night.

    "If you have obstructive sleep apnea, yes, this can be very dangerous," sleep specialist Dr. Raj Dasgupta told CNN.

    "There is lim...

    Video Games May Bring Cognitive Benefits to Kids: Study

    School-age kids who spend hours a day playing video games may outperform their peers on certain tests of mental agility, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with children who never played video games, those who regularly spent hours gaming had higher scores on two standard cognitive tests: one measuring short-term memory and another gauging impulse control.

    Experts...

    Almost All Adolescents Who Begin Gender-Affirming Hormones Continue Into Adulthood: Study

    When young adolescents strongly identify with a gender that does not match their gender at birth, one option is to offer a reversible treatment that can delay the onset of puberty.

    If the desire to transition endures, that delay can be followed with a second step: hormone treatments designed to trigger physical changes that match a young person's true sense of identity. But that begs the ...

    Too Few Young People Get Mental Health Follow-Up After ER Visit

    When teens and young adults go to the emergency room or are hospitalized for critical mental health issues a staggering number are not receiving quick follow-up care, new U.S. research finds.

    Researchers at the University of Massachusetts looked at more than 100,000 ER visits of young people ages 12 to 27 who have private insurance. Only about 29% received follow-up care within seve...

    Sports Like Soccer, Basketball Are Better Than Running for Young People's Bones

    Playing sports can benefit children in many ways, but all sports are not equal when it comes to their bones.

    New research suggests children will have healthier bones if they participate in multidirectional sports such as soccer or basketball, rather than unidir...

    Screen Kids 8 and Older for Anxiety, Expert Panel Recommends

    Children aged 8 and up should be screened for anxiety, the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended on Tuesday. Kids aged 12 and up should also be screened for

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 12, 2022
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  • America's Teen Athletes Are Bouncing Back After Pandemic Lows

    Before the pandemic, Theodore Kleinman, then a rising high school freshman, was excited to earn his spot on the varsity track team. Aside from staying in shape, he was also looking forward to making new friends and being part of a group.

    Unfortunately, COVID shutdowns derailed those plans. Now, as a junior, the New York City teen is finally back on track -- literally and figuratively. "I ...

    Speeding, Texting a Dangerous Duo for Many Teen Drivers: Study

    Danger on the road: Speeding and texting while driving are two common but risky behaviors among teens, a new study finds.

    Among teen drivers in the study, researchers found they drove over the speed limit on 40% of trips and held cellphones more than 30% of th...

    Could Synthetic Turf Raise Kids' Odds for Injuries, Concussions?

    At some schools, grassy sports fields have been replaced by easier-to-maintain synthetic turf.

    But it turns out that may be more likely to cause player injuries.

    Noting that synthetic turf football fields have been associated with more ankle and knee injuries, medical stude...

    1 in 7 U.S. High School Students Now Vapes

    Teen vaping continues at concerning levels, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

    About 2.5 million middle school and high school students reported that they had vaped in the past 30 days in 2022,...

    Under 21? Many N.J. Stores Will Still Sell You Cigarettes

    Though it is illegal nationwide to sell tobacco products to anyone under age 21, many New Jersey stores still do, an undercover study revealed.

    More than 40% of store visits by 18- to 20-year-olds in New Jersey resulted in purchase of cigarettes, cigars and other tobacco products,

  • By Sydney Murphy HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 6, 2022
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  • Another Sports Bonus for Kids: Healthier Eyes

    Sometimes allergies can lead to pink, irritated eyes. But allergic conjunctivitis, or "pink eye" may have a simple fix: physical fitness.

    That's the conclusion of researchers in Taiwan who tracked health data of more than 1.2 million children. The kids were examined at age ...

    Study Counters Myth That Contraceptive Pill Enlarges Breasts in Teen Girls

    Birth control pills that contain both estrogen and progestin do not contribute to growth of enlarged breasts in teens and young women, a new study finds, and may actually be associated with developing less severe breast enlargement.

    Moreover, the combination pills don't increase the risk of regrowth after breast-reduction surgery, said researcher Dr. Brian Labow and colleagues. Labow is w...

    Rise in Cases of Kids Infected With Virus Linked to Paralyzing Illness

    Cases of a virus that strikes children and teens and can trigger paralysis in rare cases have been increasing in the United States and could continue to do so this fall, health officials warned Tuesday.

    Increases of enterovirus D68...

    Type 1 Diabetes Is Tougher on Girls Than Boys: Study

    Girls with type 1 diabetes may fare worse than boys when it comes to blood sugar control and other critical aspects of their health, a new research review finds.

    The review of 90 published studies by researchers in the Netherlands...

    High Levels of PFAS 'Forever' Chemicals in Kids' School Uniforms

    Your children's school clothes may look neat, but are they safe to wear?

    Maybe not.

    Researchers found high levels of dangerous chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in school uniforms sold across North America. These chemicals — which can build up in people and the envir...

    U.S. Teens' Drinking, Smoking Declines While Vaping & Pot Use Keep Rising

    Fewer U.S. teenagers are drinking and smoking these days, but marijuana and vaping have gained in popularity — particularly among kids with lots of unsupervised free time.

    Depression Affects Almost 1 in 10 Americans

    Nearly 10% of Americans suffer from depression, with the mood disorder increasing fastest among teens and young adults, a new study finds.

    Between 2015 and 2020, incidence of depression reached 9% among Americans 12 and older. Among teens and young adults, the depression rate stood at 17% in 2020, the researchers found.

    "

    Chicken Cooked in NyQuil? Help Kids Steer Clear of Social Media 'Medicine Challenges'

    Misusing over-the-counter medications can have dangerous consequences, but recent social media trends encouraging this could be downright deadly for gullible teens, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

    One concerning trend has been a challenge that encouraged people to cook chicken in NyQu...

    Breathing Dirty Air Can Cause Teens' Hearts to Skip a Beat

    Air pollution may cause irregular heart rhythms in otherwise healthy teens within two hours of exposure, a new study shows.

    Irregular heart rhythms, or arrhythmias, occur when the heart's electrical impulses don't work p...

    Concussion Aftermath Could Drag Down Teens' Grades

    Efforts to prevent concussions from happening at school or school-related sports activities may help keep teens from lagging behind on their academics.

    In a new study, researchers at the University of Washington found that those who had a recent

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 14, 2022
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  • One App Is Especially Bad for Teens' Sleep

    Many teens look at screens at bedtime, but some apps are more likely to keep them awake than others, leading to sleep problems.

    That's the upshot of a new study in which researchers found YouTube fans experienced consistent and negative effects on sleep. Surprisingly, traditional TV was associated with earlier bedtim...

    TikTok 'Slugging' Trend Has People Coating Their Faces With Grease

    To slug or not to slug? That's the question for millions of TikTok users, who turn to the social media giant for tips and information on what amounts to a DIY skin care phenomenon.

    Slugging involves slathering some sort...

    Getting Kids Walking, Biking to School Can Lead to Long-Term Fitness

    Kids who walk, skateboard or ride their bikes to school when they are young are more likely to keep it up as they get older, reaping the health benefits, recent research suggests.

    “The walk to school is a wonderful moment in the day that provides children a glimpse of living an active lifestyle,” said study...

    Juul to Pay $438.5 Million for Its Role in Teen Vaping Crisis

    Juul Labs said Tuesday it will pay $438.5 million, without acknowledging wrongdoing, to settle dozens of lawsuits filed over company practices that may have fueled widespread vaping among American teens.

    "This settlement with 34 states and territories is a significant part of our ongoing commitment to resolve issues from the past," the company said in a

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 7, 2022
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  • Teens More Likely to Vape If Parent Smokes

    Parents who smoke should know that their kids are more likely to vape and try smoking.

    Those teens were 55% more likely to try e-cigarettes than those of nonsmoking parents and 51% more likely to have tried traditional cigar...

    'Digital Self-Harm': When Teens Cyberbully Themselves

    Up to 9% of American teens say they've engaged in what's known as "digital self-harm" -- anonymously posting negative comments about themselves on social media.

    As is the case with acts of physical self-harm such as cutting, this "virtual" self-harm is associated with a higher risk for thinking about or attempting suicide, according to a startling

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 2, 2022
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  • Many Teens Easily Fooled by Fake Online Health Messages

    Many teenagers have a hard time discerning between accurate health messages and “fake news," a new study finds.

    Presented with a choice between fake and true health messages, about two in five teenagers considered both messages equally trustworthy, researchers found...

    Tight Blood Sugar Control Boosts Brain Power of Teens With Type 1 Diabetes: Study

    When teenagers with type 1 diabetes get better control of their blood sugar, their brains may benefit, a new clinical trial shows.

    Researchers found that when teenagers started treatment with a newer technology — often dubbed "artificial pancreas" systems ...

    'Healthier' Option? Fit Teens Are More Likely to Vape

    It might seem incongruous, but new research suggests that teens who engage in more physical activity may vape m...

    The Most Common Form of Bullying Isn't Physical or Verbal

    The most widespread form of bullying isn't physical acts like pushing or kicking, nor is it verbal threats or derogatory remarks. Far and away bullies' top tactic is social exclusion.

    Also known as "relational aggression," this involves shutting out peers from group activities and spreading false rumors about them. And research underscores the damage done by this behavior.

    “When a...

    School Sports Are Starting Again: Know the Signs of Concussion

    As high school sports get underway this fall, sports medicine specialists remind athletes, parents and coaches that concussions can be challenging to diagnose.

    Dr. Sean Bradley, a primary care sports medicine physician at Ochsn...

    Helmets Protect Young Lacrosse Players, Study Finds

    A rule requiring high school girls who play lacrosse to wear protective headgear is paying big dividends in Florida.

    Their risk of concussion is lower than that of players in states without such a mandate,

  • By Marianne (Consumer)Madeiros HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 25, 2022
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