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20 Jul

When Mom is BRCA+, Should the Kids Be Told?

Teens and young adults adapt well to family genetic information, reporting relatively low psychological stress, researchers say.

Health News Results - 404

Hints That Experimental Drug Might Curb a Form of ALS

People with a rare genetic form of ALS may benefit from extended use of an investigational drug, a new study shows.

The medication, tofersen, benefited patients with mutations of the gene SOD1. These mutations create a misfolded version of a protein, which leads to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also kn...

Deep Brain Stimulation Offers Hope Against Severe OCD

THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When traditional treatments fail to help patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), an implant that zaps the brain with electrical pulses just might, a new research review shows.

...

Lots of Nightmares in Middle Age Might Be Warning Sign of Dementia

THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- No one likes nightmares, but having persistently bad dreams may also signal impending dementia, new British research suggests.

In the study, people aged 35 to 64 who had bad dr...

Depression, PTSD Plague Flint Residents 5 Years After Water Crisis

An unprecedented water crisis continues to take a heavy toll on the mental health of adults in Flint, Michigan, a large survey shows.

Five years after the crisis, an estimated one in five — about 13,600 people — remained clinically depressed, the survey found. And about one in four — 1...

COVID Appears to Raise Risk for Alzheimer's Disease

COVID-19 infection may significantly boost an older person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new, large-scale study suggests.

People 65 and older who contracted COVID were nearly 70% more likely overall to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's within a year of their infection, researchers report. Th...

Kids With Bell's Palsy Typically Recover Without Treatment

While adults typically need steroid medication to treat Bell’s palsy, most children can recover without treatment, a new study finds.

Bell’s palsy temporarily causes weakness and pa...

In Boxers and MMA Fighters, Brain May Make Some Recovery After Retirement

Professional fighters take a lot of knocks to the head, but a new study suggests they may find themselves thinking more clearly again after they retire.

Many studies have pointed to the perils of repeated blows to the head in sports like boxing and football.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 15, 2022
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  • Concussion Aftermath Could Drag Down Teens' Grades

    Efforts to prevent concussions from happening at school or school-related sports activities may help keep teens from lagging behind on their academics.

    In a new study, researchers at the University of Washington found that those who had a recent

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 14, 2022
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  • In Rare Cases, Monkeypox Can Trigger Dangerous Brain Inflammation

    Though the risk appears small, a new review suggests that, in rare instances, monkeypox may trigger serious neurological complications, including seizures and brain inflammation.

    The finding is based on a look at 19 studies conducted in the United States, the United Kingdom and across Africa.

    A...

    Research Reveals Cause of 'Freezing' Gait in Parkinson's

    Researchers think they've figured out why Parkinson's disease causes a person's limbs to become so stiff that at times they can feel frozen in place.

    Using a robotic chair equipped with sensors, a research team has linked the activation of leg muscles in Parkinson's patients with a region of the brain called the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 12, 2022
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  • Screening Test Leads to Fewer Women Included in Autism Studies

    A frequently used screening test for autism creates a gender gap that could hinder diagnosis and treatment for women and girls, a new study suggests.

    Researchers who study autism have been working to include m...

    In Rare Move, FDA Panel Gives Support to Controversial ALS Drug in 2nd Review

    In a rare second review, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel on Wednesday recommended approval for an experimental drug for ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).

    The FDA is not obligated t...

    Justin Bieber Takes Break From Touring Due to Health Issues

    Singer Justin Bieber said Tuesday that he will take a break from touring while he takes care of his health.

    Bieber has a condition known as Ramsay Hunt syndrome, which is rare type of viral infection. Caused by the chickenpox- and shingles-related

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 7, 2022
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  • Blood Test Shows Promise for Quick Diagnosis of ALS

    Patients suspected of having amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may soon be able to get a diagnosis much more quickly, not wasting the precious time many have left, new research suggests.

    In 20...

    With 'Chemical Imbalance' Theory in Doubt, What's Next for Depression Care?

    TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- For Mary Christ, the idea that depression is a chemical imbalance in the brain has always felt true to her personal experience.

    A former educator, Christ, 57, has taken antidepressants for much of her adult life. She experienced bouts of anxiety and panic attacks from...

    FDA Panel Skeptical of Controversial ALS Drug Ahead of Vote

    A U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel will once again consider approval for an experimental drug for ALS, a rare second review for a disease that has no cure.

    The same panel that will meet ...

    How 'This Is Us' Put Alzheimer's Care in the Spotlight

    When the wildly popular TV show “This Is Us” wrapped up its final season this year, it did so with a storyline that showed one of the lead characters dealing with Alzheimer's disease as her adult children disagreed over the type of care she should receive.

    Now, a new online survey of more than 700...

    Widely Used Steroid Meds Could Alter the Brain

    Long-term steroid use can reshape the structure of the brain, causing some parts to shrink and others to grow, a major new study reports.

    People taking steroids -- even inhaled steroids -- appear to have less intact white matter structure in their brains compared with those not taking the drugs, brain scans reveal. White matter serves as the communication link between different regions of...

    School Sports Are Starting Again: Know the Signs of Concussion

    As high school sports get underway this fall, sports medicine specialists remind athletes, parents and coaches that concussions can be challenging to diagnose.

    Dr. Sean Bradley, a primary care sports medicine physician at Ochsn...

    Hate Listening to People Chewing? You Might Have Misophonia

    Most people have cherished memories of their grandparents reading to them as children.

    Ekaterina Pesheva's memories are quite different.

    "I remember distinctly being very irritated and very angry listening to my grandmother reading children's books to me, like fairy tales," said Pesheva, 48, who lives in Boston. "I would become aware of her mouth getting dry, and that, for whatever ...

    There's More MS in Northern Countries. Now, Researchers Find New Reason Why

    Vitamin D exposure, or lack of it, has long been thought to influence the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) because the disease is diagnosed more often in people in northern countries.

    However, new research suggests there might be an additional reas...

    Too Much TV Time May Really Harm Your Brain

    Older adults who get a lot of "screen time" may have an increased risk of developing dementia — but a lot depends on what type of screen they use, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among older British adults, those w...

    In Trial, Brain Zaps Gave Seniors a Month-Long Memory Boost

    If you're a senior who struggles to remember where you put your car keys, could noninvasive brain stimulation boost your memory?

    Yes, clai...

    Why Coffee & Cigarette Is a Morning Ritual for Millions

    Smokers in the throes of nicotine withdrawal when they wake up in the morning may crave not just a cigarette but a cup of coffee along with it.

    Science can explain that.

    Researchers have identified two compounds in coffee that directly affect certain nicotine receptors in...

    Major Gene Study Spots DNA Tied to Autism, Other Disorders

    More than 70 genes are very strongly associated with autism and more than 250 are linked to the condition, a major new genetic analysis has revealed.

    The analysis is the largest of its kind to date, involving more than 150,000 participants, including 20,000 diagnosed with autism.

    The researchers found t...

    Is It Parkinson's? These 10 Signs Could Tell

    Parkinson's disease can be hard for the average person to identify, but 10 warning signs may offer an early clue that you or a loved one may be developing the disease.

    The Parkinson's Foundation suggests being aware of

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 19, 2022
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  • Lead Poisoning Plus Systemic Racism Are Harming Black Kids' Test Scores

    It's well known that exposure to lead can harm young children's brain development. Now a new study suggests that racial segregation may be compounding the detrimental effects of lead on Black children.

    The study, of close to 26,000 schoolchildren, found that Black children with elevated blood lead levels had wo...

    Nerve Block Plus Lidocaine Clears Psoriasis in Small Study

    Spinal injections of a common anesthetic may help clear the inflammatory skin condition psoriasis, a small pilot study suggests.

    The study involved four patients with severe psoriasis, and researchers are describing it as a "proof-of-concept" — specifically, the idea that targeting certain sen...

    Your Brain Gets Tired, and Scientists Now Know Why

    Preparing your taxes is a purely mental activity, but one that leaves many exhausted by the end of the effort.

    The same goes for reading a dense report, picking apart reams of spreadsheet data, or writing a fact-laden paper.

    That feeling of

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 12, 2022
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  • Everyday Activities That Can Cut Your Odds for Dementia

    Reading, doing yoga and spending time with family and friends might help lower your risk of dementia, a new study suggests.

    "Previous studies have shown that leisure activities were associated with various health benefits, such as a lower cancer risk, a reduction of

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 12, 2022
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  • When Older Dogs' Hearing Fades, Risk of Dementia Rises

    When dogs' hearing fades, their mental skills follow, new research reveals.

    For the study, the researchers examined the link between hearing loss in aging dogs and dementia. The findings shed light on ways sensory loss affects canine cognition (thinking skills) and could lead to better tre...

    Who Fares Worse After Multiple Sclerosis Strikes?

    For people with multiple sclerosis, certain factors early in their disease may determine their quality of life in the years to come, a new study suggests.

    In medicine, there are ways to objectively measure a disease's course, such as whether a medication is keeping it under control. And then there's health-related

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 11, 2022
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  • COVID May Be Tied to Rise in Brain Infections in Children

    COVID-19 may be linked to a rise in bacterial brain infections in children, a new study suggests.

    When the pandemic hit, doctors at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital of Spectrum Health in Grand Rapids, Mich., saw a worrisome 236% rise in these infections and wondered why.

    Although rare, these infections can be mild, needing only antibiotics to clear, or severe, requiring surgery and t...

    Too Little Sleep May Harm Young Kids' Brains

    For peak performance, school-age children need more than a healthy diet and exercise. They also need plenty of sleep.

    A new study finds that elementary school kids who get less than nine hours of sleep each night show significant differences in some brain regions responsible for memory, intelligence and well-being compared to those who get the advised nine to 12 hours' sleep.

    “We ...

    Kids With ADHD Have Differences in 'Neural Flexibility,' Brain Study Shows

    Children with ADHD may have less flexibility in the brain circuitry that allows for seamless "multitasking," a new study suggests.

    Research has shown that kids with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder often have more difficulty with so-called cognitive flexibility than their peers wi...

    Rapid Loss of Smell May Be Alzheimer's Precursor

    Could the future of dementia screening include a test of a person's sense of smell?

    It may, suggests a new study that found the decline in a person's sense of smell could predict their loss of mental function and warn of structural changes in the brain that are important in Alzheimer's d...

    Even Chores, Socializing Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

    Your daily walk, cleaning the house and lunch with friends could together be keys to staving off dementia, according to researchers.

    A new study looked at lifestyle habits that could help lower risks, instead of factors that may contribute to the disease.

    Researchers in China combed t...

    8/9 -- Study Casts Doubt on 'Chemical Imbalance' Theory of Depression

    The notion that depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain has become widespread among the general public.

    But there's actually no hard evidence that the brain chemical

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • Most Post-Stroke Depression Still Goes Untreated

    While depression is common after a stroke, most stroke patients who need mental health care aren't getting the help they need, new research reveals.

    Roughly one in three stroke victims have depression. But about two-thirds of those received no mental health treatment. Patients who were older, men, Black people or Hispanic folks were even less likely to get help, the study found.

    “...

    Exercise, Puzzles, Games: They Help Men's, Women's Brains Differently

    Exercising your body and mind can help stave off memory problems as you age, and some of these benefits may be even greater for women, a new study suggests.

    The study looked at cognitive reserve, or the brain's ability to withstand the effects of diseases like Alzheimer's without showing a decline i...

    Dogs' Keen Sense of Smell May Help Them 'See'

    While humans typically use their sight to orient themselves, dogs navigate the world by combining their sense of smell with their vision.

    So claims a new study that found dogs' sense of smell is integrated with their vision and other unique parts of their brain.

    "We've never seen this connection between the nose and the

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 21, 2022
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  • Special Brain Scans May Diagnose Early Parkinson's

    It may not be long before highly sensitive scans might spot Parkinson's disease in its early stages, researchers report.

    A disease of the brain that is characterized by shaking hands, Parkinson's is a condition that wor...

    Even a Drink a Day Might Raise Brain Risks

    Even moderate drinking may be related to higher iron levels in the brain - a potentially risky situation for memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among nearly 21,000 middle-aged and older adults, those who drank as little as a few beers a week sh...

    Mindfulness Can Help Ease Pain, and Scientists Think They Know How

    For thousands of years, people have used meditation to help diminish their pain -- but how the process works has always seemed rather mysterious.

    Today, advanced brain scan technology has revealed how this ancient practice alters brain function and provides pain relief to its practiti...

    Brad Pitt Believes He Has Rare 'Face Blindness' Disorder -- What Is It?

    Award-winning actor Brad Pitt believes he suffers from a rare condition that interferes with his ability to recognize people's faces.

    In a new interview with GQ magazine, Pitt said that he thinks he has prosopagnosia, an extremely rare neurological condition that makes it difficult to tell f...

    Feeling 'Hangry'? It's Natural, New Study Finds

    The concept of "hangry" helps sell candy bars, and it's a convenient excuse to snap at someone when you're in a foul mood.

    But is hangry -- being angry when you're hungry -- a real thing? Do people really become more irritable when they want food?

    "My wife sometimes used to tell me, 'you're being hangry.' And I kind of always thought that's not a real thing -- it's not a real psycho...

    Could ADHD Meds Help Treat Alzheimer's?

    Could ADHD drugs also treat degenerative brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease?

    British researchers say there is good evidence that some medications used for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - known as noradrenergic drugs - might also help treat key aspects of Alzheimer's.

    "...

    Research Spots Gene That Raises Alzheimer's Risk for Women

    Researchers studying genes involved in Alzheimer's disease have identified a new gene, called MGMT, that increases risk for this common dementia in women.

    "This is one of a few and perhaps the strongest associations of a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's that is spec...

    Brain Changes Link Menopause With Higher Alzheimer's Risk

    Women are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than men, and a new study shows that certain brain changes known to increase this risk may accrue during menopause.

    Women who have gone through menopause have more white matter hyperintensities in their brains than premenopausal women or men of the same age, res...

    First Major League Soccer Player Is Diagnosed With CTE

    When former professional Major League Soccer (MLS) player Scott Vermillion died at age 44, he had stage 2 CTE, his family announced Tuesday.

    He is the first former MLS player diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Vermillion died from an accidental overdose in December 2020.

    "Th...

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