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Autism services are harder to find in many of the places where Black, Hispanic and Native American families live, new research shows.

It's known that there are racial disparities in U.S. families' receipt of autism services — ranging from diagnosis and behavioral therapy to school and community programs.

The

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 30, 2023
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  • Just like adults, children need lots of fiber in their diets.

    Fiber is part of what fuels a child’s normal growth and development. It helps them feel full longer, controls blood sugar levels, reduces cholesterol and promotes regular bowel movements, according to Children's Health of Orange County, Calif. ...

    Researchers have long struggled to figure out what causes a seemingly healthy baby to die suddenly in the first year of life, with an array of possible genetic and environmental factors to choose from.

    Now a large, Danish study has found that in families where one child has succumbed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a younger sibling’s risk appears to quadruple.

    “I am not...

    Autism cases are surging in the New York-New Jersey metro area, mainly fueled by the diagnosis of autistic children who don’t have intellectual disabilities, a new study reports.

    The percentage of kids identified with autism spectrum disorder rose from about 1% in 2000 to 3% in 2016 in that region, said lead researcher

    When kids suffer a concussion, an extended period of rest at home is always the best course, right? Perhaps not.

    In fact, a new study suggests that -- despite what many people may presume -- getting kids back to school quickly is the best way to boost ...

    By the time they're teenagers, babies born prematurely may be getting poorer school grades than their non-preemie peers.

    Researchers found that babies born before 34 weeks of pregnancy had lower scores on math and language tests during their teen years compared to kids born at 40 weeks.

    However, the study did not find a significant difference in later brain function in babies born b...

    While childhood obesity gets a lot of attention, some kids struggle with the opposite issue — they have trouble gaining weight.

    So, how can parents know if their child is “too skinny?”

    While the best resource is likely a child’s pediatrician, experts have also weighed in on the topic.

    “Underlying health conditions can result in children and adolescents being underwei...

    As colds, flu and COVID continue to circulate this winter, a new U.S. government study finds that young children infected with COVID plus a second virus tend to become sicker.

    While severe COVID is rare among children, kids can and do fall ill enough to end up in the hospital.

    During the pandemic's first two years, young U.S. children who were hospitalized with COVID tended to be mo...

    When birth rates fall in the United States, experts try to figure out what’s happening.

    The fertility rate is at its lowest since the 1970s -- 1.71 per woman, according to a new study.

    But it's not that young people today don't want children, new research suggests. In fac...

    A Texas-based education initiative has found that enrolling children in poor communities in gardening and cooking classes may help boost their long-term health.

    Called “Texas Sprouts," the program covered one full academic year and exposed elementary school children in 16 low-income schools access to outdoor gardening instruction, nutrition information and cooking lessons. Parents were ...

    If a study conducted at one St. Louis hospital is a good indicator, the COVID pandemic is tied to a surge in childhood injuries and deaths due to firearms.

    Black children and those in low-income households were at greater risk, according to the University of Missouri-led study.

    “We found a significant increase in pediatric firearm injury rates during the pandemic compared to the ...

    Vaccinations among kindergarteners declined for the second year in a row, leaving hundreds of thousands of young children vulnerable to dangerous infectious diseases, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

    About 93% of kindergarteners had their required vaccinations during the 2021-2022 school year, including the measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis, polio and chick...

    Continuing a decades-long trend, the percentage of American women who've ever had a child declined again in the latest figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    "A lower percentage of women aged 15 to 44 in 2015–2019 had ever had a biological child (52.1%) compared with women aged 15 to 44 in 2011–2015 (54.9%)," concluded a report issued Jan. 10 by the CDC's Na...

    Two companies are issuing new recalls on Monday for millions of previously recalled rocking sleepers for infants, with about 115 infant deaths possibly linked to use of the sleepers so far reported.

    With both products, the Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play Sleepers and the Kids2 Rocking Sleepers, infants have rolled from their back to their stomach or side while unrestrained, in addition to pos...

    Following the deaths of 15 infants, families are advised to immediately stop using all models of Kids2 Rocking Sleepers, according to a second recall notice.

    Four of those 15 babies died after the first recall notice, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported.

    The company is recalling 694,000 Rocking Sleepers. Parents can contact the Kids2 company for a refund.

    An antidote to teenage depression might be found in school gymnasiums and on sports fields, a major new review argues.

    Supervised exercise programs are associated with significant reductions in symptoms of depression among children and teenagers, according to the analysis of data from 21 studies involving more than 2,400 kids.

    “This is the first time that we've been able to put en...

    Generous parental leave policies at work can do wonders for a new mom's mental health.

    This is among the key messages from a new review of 45 studies examining how parental leave policies affect mom and dad’s mental health and well-being.

    Mothers working for companies with generous parental leave policies were less likely to experience symptoms of depression, poor mental heal...

    As more U.S. states legalize marijuana, the number of preschoolers accidentally eating cannabis "edibles" is rising in tandem, a new study shows.

    In the past five years, U.S. poison control centers have witnessed a whopping 14-fold increase in calls about youngsters who got their hands on marijuana edibles.

    In 2017, there were just 207 cases reported nationally. By 2021, that had b...

    When children have autism, it's possible to recognize the symptoms as early as when they are 18 months old.

    Although it takes a doctor to diagnose the condition, parents and caregivers should be aware of the signs, advises the Autism Research Institute, offering some other tips for noticing early symptoms.

    Children with autism may have variety of social, communication and behaviora...

    It might seem like your toddler or preschooler has a nose that is always runny, but experts say that's normal.

    “Children under 6 years of age average six to eight colds per year, with symptoms lasting an average of 14 days,” said Dr. Maria Mejia, an associate professor of family and community medicine at...

    Preteens who spend much of their free time watching online videos or playing video games may have a heightened risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among 9,200 9- and 10-year-olds they assessed, the odds of developing OCD inched up ...

    Cold, dry winter air and a trio of spreading viruses could cause children's asthma to flare up this winter season.

    But experts at one children's hospital offer some tips to help parents keep their kids' worrisome respiratory symptoms in check.

    While asthma is a lung condition that can make it harder to breathe, some things can make symptoms worse, such as illness, cold air and smok...

    Many young U.S. adults are estranged from their parents, at least temporarily -- with the father/child bond being especially fragile.

    Those are among the findings of a new national study that tracked thousands of parent-child relationships from the 1990s to recent years.

    Researchers found that one-quarter of young adults were estranged from their fathers at some point -- four times ...

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is looking into a possible increase in invasive group A strep bacterial infections among children in the United States.

    A number of children's hospitals in different parts of the country have reported seeing more dangerous strep A infections in recent weeks, leading federal officials to launch an investigation.

    The agency noted the...

    Keeping an eye on safety will let the joy from holiday toys last longer, without a trip to the emergency room, experts say.

    Last year, more than 200,000 people were treated in emergency departments for toy-related injuries, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

    Dr. R...

    Final exams are stressful for students, but it is possible to ratchet down the pressure with some planning and self-compassion.

    A psychologist from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston offers a few suggestions for helping teens manage the pressure.

    Start with the basics, including making sure the teen is getting sufficient sleep, eating nutritiously without skipping meals and main...

    Kids who get the flu and COVID-19 together may be in for a serious, even deadly, bout of illness, U.S. health officials said Friday.

    So far, infections with both viruses in children have been rare because last flu season was mild, but this one could see dramatic uptick in coinfections, according to a New York City-based expert.

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 16, 2022
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  • The pandemic's focus on vaccines may have had a big downside: While kids have long been required to get certain shots to attend public school, a growing number of their parents now oppose these requirements, a new poll finds.

    About 35% of parents now say childhood vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella should not be mandatory, up from 23% in 2019. Overall, 28% of adults nationwide say pa...

    Nearly one-quarter of all American adults who care for an elderly parent also care for a child at the same time, a new study reveals.

    And when compared with those who only have a parent under their watch, members of the so-called “sandwich generation” — namely caregivers of both the old and the young — are much more likely to struggle with money problems, emotional trouble an...

    Black children and teens drown in swimming pools at rates seven times higher than white children, but a new survey suggests that special swimming programs could make a difference and help save lives.

    The survey, from the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, found that only 25% of Hispanic parents and 28% of Black parents were comfortable with their own swimming ski...

    Shortages of the ADHD drug Adderall are expected to continue for months, forcing families to scramble for ways to deal with their children's attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    The shortage has caused headaches and hassles for parents like San Diego mom Jackie Meader, who has been "flustered, rushed and out of sorts" since her 16-year-old son's prescription ran out about a mo...

    An attempt to block California's flavored tobacco ban was stopped Monday when the Supreme Court declined to hear the case.

    That now means the ban will go into effect on Dec. 21.

    The ban includes everything from candy flavors to menthol in a wide range of tobacco products including vape ...

    Babies born prematurely who are fed formula may need iron supplementation like their breastfed counterparts, new research suggests.

    “Just because a baby is on iron-rich formula, we should not assume all of their iron needs are being met, since iron from the formula may not have the same absorption as iron from breast milk,” said researcher Grace Power. She is a third-year medical stu...

    It's an all-too-familiar scenario for many parents: Your preschooler starts to act up just as the phone rings or you start dinner.

    Maybe you hand over an iPad or smartphone to soothe the child so you can get down to business.

    And this probably does the trick. But if this is your go-to strategy, your child may be at risk for developing longer-term behavioral issues — especially boy...

    The updated bivalent COVID-19 boosters are now approved for use in children as young as 6 months of age, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today.

    Children can receive either a Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech bivalent booster shot, although the rules differ depending on their age and what type of vaccine they got as their primary series, the FDA said.

    Kids 6 months to 5 year...

    A high number of preteens and teens in the United States have viewed pornography and many have also sent or received nude or seminude photos -- sexting -- over their smartphones, a new study reveals.

    “The prevalence rates we found in this study suggest that school counselors must be prepared to talk about sexting and pornography use with students, and to change the narrative about the...

    Researchers have discovered a link between access to welfare payments and foster care.

    As many as 29,000 fewer children may have entered the foster care system during the 12-year study if U.S. states had made it easier for poor families to receive cash through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

    "The relatively small amount of income provided through...

    American kids are drinking to excess less and abusing marijuana more, a new study finds.

    Marijuana abuse among 6- to 18-year-olds has increased 245% since 2000, while child alcohol abuse has steadily declined over those years, say researchers who analyzed poisonings over two decades.

    "This dramatic increase does coincide with this huge wave of decriminalization in the U.S.," s...

    Young girls tend to babble their way to bigger vocabularies earlier than boys, and researchers now think they might know why.

    It has nothing to do with gender, and everything to do with parental interaction, researchers assert.

    Parents tend to talk more to young children who have started talking and can respond to them, regardless of gender, according to data derived from more than ...

    Getting toys for some of the tots in your life this holiday season? Experts at Penn State Health offer tips on making safe choices.

    Each year, about 200,000 U.S. children end up in the emergency room with a toy-related injury, ranging from poisoning to choking hazards, according to Jen Lau

    An early surge in cold and flu cases has created shortages in key antiviral and antibiotic drugs needed for the annual “sick season,” pharmacists report.

    The antiviral flu drug Tamiflu is in short supply for both adults and children, in both its brand name formulation as well as the generic version, said Mich...

    Millions of Americans will enjoy a hot, nutritious Thanksgiving meal thanks to their local food pantry, often staffed by volunteers. Now, new research spotlights just how important these charities are.

    Families who rely on pantries for food assistance come away with $600 to $1,000 in free meals and produce every year, after taking into account time, transportation and other costs associ...

    It's a common dilemma when your child seems sick: Do you call the doctor, make a trip to urgent care or head straight to the emergency room?

    If it's not an emergency, a call to your child's pediatrician may help guide you. The doctor's staff may recommend bringing your child in for a visit or going to urgent care -- particularly after hours when the pediatrician's office isn't open.

    <...

    With U.S. health officials calling childhood obesity a public health crisis, conversations about weight are important. But what you say to your kids can be challenging, and even counterproductive, a new study found.

    "Body weight is a sensitive issue and the way we talk about it matters," said lead author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 21, 2022
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  • Vaccines have become a hot topic in the past few years, but a new survey finds many parents aren't discussing immunization with their child's doctor.

    Though a child's pediatrician has often been the go-to resource on vaccines, the University of Michigan Medicine poll found that 1 in 7 parents have not discussed vaccines with their child's doctor during the pandemic.

    While 80% of p...

    Something — or rather, someone — may be standing between moms and a regular exercise routine: their children.

    New research from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton in the United Kingdom suggests that fewer than half of mothers met recommended activity levels, a number that was even lower when the children were younger or there was more than one.

    “It is perhaps not ...

    Millions of parents drop their toddlers off at day care centers so they can go to work, but some are racked with guilt about it.

    One of their main concerns? Time spent in group day care could encourage their toddler to start acting out.

    Now, a large, new study suggests that parents can breathe a sigh of relief: Kids who spend long hours in day care centers aren't any more likel...

    Children's health is jeopardized when they have a parent in prison, new research finds.

    In the United States, 5 million kids have an incarcerated parent. Those children have worse access to primary, dental and mental health care than their peers, the investigators found.

    And that puts the kids at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes, according to the study.

    “...

    Increasing numbers of young children are showing up in emergency rooms after accidentally ingesting the cough suppressant benzonatate, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.

    Benzonatate is a non-narcotic cough suppressant first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1958 for children ages 10 and up. It works by reducing the cough reflex in the lungs and airways.

    "Benz...

    Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.

    Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities.

    The study found similar results for other after-school...