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Health News Results - 130

Who's Most Likely to Get Bullied at School?

TUESDAY, July 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Bullying remains a threat to American teens, and a new study reveals which kids may be at highest risk.

Race-based bullying takes a heavy toll on teens, the research found, but minority kids who are picked on for other reasons — whether gender, sexual orientation, religion, disability or immigration status — suffer a double...

Worry, Depression, Burnout: Survey Finds College Students Stressed as Fall Term Nears

Like many of her peers, Ohio State University engineering student Mary Trabue spent much of the pandemic taking classes online. And she was struggling.

"I don't know what was wrong, but I just felt tired all the time because I wasn't sleeping," she said. "And I knew I couldn't continue down that path."

Whether a question of COVID-related depression, anxiety, burnout or all of t...

Federal Court Backs Indiana University's Vaccine Mandate

Indiana University's mandate that most students be vaccinated in order to attend classes was upheld by a federal judge on Monday in what may be the first such ruling in the United States.

The decision came in a lawsuit involving eight students who claimed the vaccine requirement violated their right to bodily integrity and autonomy, and that COVID-19 vaccines should not be considered pa...

White Men's Grip on U.S. Health Care May Be Slipping

TUESDAY, July 20, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. medical field is less dominated by white men than it used to be, but there are still few Black and Hispanic doctors, dentists and pharmacists, a new study finds.

The study, which looked at trends over the past 20 years, found that white men no longer make up the majority of physicians and surgeons in the United States....

How Your Kid's Education Could Make You Healthier

If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

Do Women or Men Make the Best Doctors?

MONDAY, July 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When you're hospitalized, you'll want qualified medical professionals treating you, but does it matter if your doctor is a man or a woman?

It might.

A new study in Canada found that patients cared for by female physicians had lower in-hospital death rates than those who had male doctors.

"Our study overall shows th...

Remote Learning Hurt High School Students Academically, Emotionally

There were academic, social and emotional consequences for U.S. high school students who attended classes remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

The study included more than 6,500 students in Orange County Public Schools in Florida, who were surveyed in October 2020, when two-thirds were attending school remotely and one-third were attending in person.

On a 100...

Many States Move to Ban Vaccine Mandates, Passports in Public Schools

As schools around America begin to prepare for reopening this fall, many states are taking steps to stop public schools from requiring COVID-19 vaccination or proof of vaccination.

At least seven states -- Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Montana, Oklahoma and Utah -- have already passed such laws, while 34 more have introduced bills that would limit requiring someone to demonstr...

Why Handwriting Still Beats Typing, Videos at Helping Folks Learn

Want to learn something new? Pick up your pencil.

New research suggests that despite the ease of using a computer for typing notes or watching videos, people learn certain skills significantly better and faster when writing them by hand.

"The question out there for parents and educators is, why should our kids spend any time doing handwriting," said senior study author Brenda Rapp, ...

Vaccinated Teachers, Students Can Skip Masks This Fall: CDC

When schools open their doors this fall, teachers and students who are vaccinated can enter without masks, according to a new guidance issued Friday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The relaxed recommendation comes as a national vaccination campaign in which children as young as 12 can get COVID-19 shots unfolds, accompanied by a general decline in coronavirus hospi...

School-Based Mindfulness Program Gives Big Boost to Young Kids' Sleep

THURSDAY, July 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Children tend to sleep less as they approach early adolescence, perhaps because of the pressures of homework and the presence of social media.

Now, new research suggests that loss of precious slumber is not inevitable.

The researchers found that a school-based program in mindfulness training — which involves being pres...

What Drives Preschoolers' Curiosity to Learn?

Want to hold a preschooler's interest in learning something new? Give them just enough information to make them want to know more, a new study suggests.

This creates the perfect mix of uncertainty and curiosity in children, said researchers from Rutgers University, in New Jersey.

"There is an infinite amount of information in the real world," said lead study author Jenn...

High Curiosity in Infancy Carries Through to Toddler Years

Using a bit of sleight of hand, researchers were able to demonstrate that babies who were the most intrigued with magic tricks became the most curious toddlers.

The children's early delight in the unexpected could be a sign of their future thinking skills, the researchers said.

"Something about a baby's curiosity about magic tricks is predicting how curious they become as preschoole...

Spanish Spoken at Home? It Won't Slow Youngsters Learning English: Study

Being in a Spanish-speaking home doesn't hamper American kids' ability to learn English, new research shows.

The first-of-its-kind study included 126 U.S.-born 5-year-olds who were exposed to Spanish at home from birth, along with varying amounts of English.

Researchers found that the kids not only learn English reliably, their total language knowledge is greater to the degree that...

Stress Has Many U.S. Teachers Leaving Profession: Survey

Teaching has always been a stressful job, and now a new survey suggests the pandemic could be driving even more teachers from the time-honored profession.

"Teacher stress was a concern prior to the pandemic and may have only become worse," said study author Elizabeth Steiner, a policy researcher at RAND Corp. "This raises the concern that more teachers may decide to quit this year than in...

Treating Teachers' Depression Could Boost Young Students' Grades: Study

When depression strikes teachers, they can suffer mightily, but a new study suggests their students' ability to learn might also be harmed.

Researchers found a correlation between teachers' depressive symptoms and math skills in early learners enrolled in Head Start programs. Head Start is a U.S. government program providing early education, nutrition, health and parent support for low-in...

Big Rise in U.S. Teens Identifying As Gay, Bisexual

More teens in the United States are reporting their sexual identity as gay, lesbian or bisexual, nationwide surveys show.

Between 2015 and 2019, the percentage of 15- to 17-year-olds who said they identified as "non-heterosexual" rose from 8.3% to 11.7%, according to nationwide surveys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Although our analyses demonstrated that t...

For Toddlers, More Time Watching Screens Mean Less Time Reading

Is too much screen time turning kids off of books?

New research suggests that's so: Toddlers who regularly spent time on electronic devices -- including tablets, smartphones and TVs -- were less likely to read print books with their parents at age 3. That, in turn, translated to even more screen use by age 5.

The findings do not prove definitively that early exposure to electronic d...

Rural U.S. Schools Are Bringing Back In-Person Learning Faster Than Urban Schools

Rural school districts in the United States have led the way back to in-person instruction during the pandemic, a survey of school leaders finds.

About 42% of rural school districts were fully back to in-school learning by February, compared with 17% of urban districts, the survey found.

The opposite was true for online learning: 29% of urban districts offered fully remote instructi...

Better Access to Birth Control Boosts School Graduation Rates

Access to free or low-cost birth control may be an important factor in improving young women's futures, according to new research from Colorado.

When access to affordable birth control increased, the percentage of young women leaving high school before graduation dropped by double digits, while the rates of pregnancies and abortions also dropped. The study, led by University of Colorado a...

Many Consumers Misunderstand Those 'Best Before' Food Labels

People may think they know what 'Best before' food date labels mean, but a new study reveals that many consumers misunderstand them.

The study of over 2,600 U.S. adults "showed that an overwhelming majority of consumers say that they use food date labels to make decisions about food and say they know what the labels mean," said study author Catherine Turvey,. She's from the department of ...

New Study Examines Sexuality of People With Autism

Adults with autism report a broad range of sexuality -- being much more likely to identify as asexual, bisexual or homosexual than people without autism, a new study finds.

In a survey of nearly 2,400 adults, researchers found that those with autism were three to nine times more likely to identify as homosexual, asexual or "other."

Among men, those with autism were over three times ...

Finding a Doctor Is Tough and Getting Tougher in Rural America

Health care in rural America has become ever more scarce during the coronavirus pandemic, with folks finding it increasingly difficult to find a doctor or get to a hospital.

For a decade, rural areas have been losing hospitals to financial problems, forcing residents to either drive long distances or shrug their shoulders and forgo needed care.

Add to that a nationwide shortage of d...

Higher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: Study

That college degree may be useful in many ways, but new research suggests it probably won't keep your brain from shrinking with age.

Over the years, a number of studies have suggested that education might buffer people against age-related declines in memory and thinking. But those findings did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

In the new study, researchers asked whether peo...

Later School Start Times Mean Better-Rested Kids: Study

Starting the school day a little later helps middle and high school students get more and better sleep, according to a new study.

The research is based on annual surveys of about 28,000 elementary, middle and high school students and their parents. The surveys were completed before and two years after school start times were changed.

Changes to sleep cycles during puberty make it ha...

Americans Are Eating Less Healthily Everywhere, Except at School

Taking a deep dive into how Americans eat, a new dietary analysis finds that no matter where people get their food, bad nutrition rules the day, with one key exception: schools.

The conclusion is based on surveys conducted among 61,000 adults and children between 2003 and 2018. Respondents' answers revealed that the quality of much of the food they've been getting from restaurants, grocer...

Kids With Autism Can Really Benefit From Exercise

FRIDAY, April 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) - Being active is good for most everyone, and new studies now show it can help kids with autism manage common behavioral issues.

"Exercise goes beyond health-related benefits and increased levels of fitness for those with autism," said David Geslak, a pioneer in using exercise to help kids with autism. "Research shows that exercise can increase focus...

Nearly 8 in 10 School, Child Care Staff Have Gotten at Least 1 Dose of COVID Vaccine: CDC

In findings that bode well for the full reopening of schools across America, a new government survey shows that nearly 80 percent of school employees and child care workers have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine.

Released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday, the latest figures came as the Biden administration pushes to reopen schools by...

More Kids With Autism May Be Doing Well Than Thought

School-age children with autism may be faring better than commonly thought, with most "doing well" in at least some aspects of development, a new study suggests.

The study, of 272 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), found that nearly 80% were doing well in at least one of five developmental areas by age 10. Nearly one-quarter were doing well in four of those areas.

The res...

Teen Pot Use Could Mean Less Success as Adult

Teenage pot use can hamper a kid's future chances of landing a good job with a large salary, mainly by interfering with his or her education, a new study of twins has found.

A teenager who uses more marijuana than their identical twin is less likely to wind up in a highly skilled occupation with better pay than their brother or sister, according to the report.

That's not because pot...

Whatever the Language, Babies LOVE Baby Talk

There's a reason you may choose to talk in singsong tones and with exaggerated sounds when you're talking to babies -- they're more likely to listen.

New research shows that babies pay more attention to baby talk than to regular speech. The finding held in many languages, and even when the baby was bilingual.

"Crucially for parents, we found that development of learning and attenti...

Nearly Half of U.S. Schools Now Offer In-Person Learning

Nearly half of the public schools in America are now holding in-person classes, with white children far more likely to be in those classrooms than Black, Hispanic or Asian students, the first federal data on the state of education during the pandemic shows.

The survey, released early Wednesday, suggests the nation is moving toward a goal set by President Joe Biden for a reopening of ...

Another Study Finds COVID Doesn't Spread in Schools With Proper Safeguards

COVID-19 transmission is rare in schools that follow precautions such as mandatory masks, social distancing and frequent hand-washing, a new study finds.

And that's true even among close school contacts of people who test positive for the new coronavirus, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"Schools can operate safely during a pandemic ...

CDC Says 3 Feet of Social Distancing Now OK in Most Classrooms

In a move that should make reopening schools an easier task, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday lowered its social distancing recommendation for most classrooms to 3 feet.

That should enable many schools to keep all students enrolled in a class within the same room.

"[The] CDC is committed to leading with science and updating our guidance as new evidence...

Does Too Much 'Screen Time' Have Your Preschooler Acting Out?

Preschoolers who spend a lot of time watching movies and shows on TVs and other screens are more likely to develop emotional and behavioral problems by age 5, a Finnish study warns.

But despite their reputation, video games did not appear to promote any emotional problems in youngsters, researchers concluded.

"We found that high levels of screen time at the age of 1.5 years is relat...

Virtual Learning Has Taken a Toll on Kids' & Parents' Mental Health

A new government report confirms what many moms and dads already know: Parents and kids are struggling mightily to cope with the stresses of distance learning.

A survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of parents of children aged 5 to 12 found that parents of kids receiving in-person instruction were less likely to suffer from stress than those whose school...

Is Your Teen Unmotivated at School? That Might Change

If your teen seems disinterested in school, new research suggests there's a good chance that things will get better over time.

"Our results point to a more hopeful picture for students who start out with lower levels of motivation," said study senior author Kui Xie, a professor of educational studies at Ohio State University in Columbus

The study included 1,670 students at 11 public...

College Students With ADHD Have Lower Grades, Higher Dropout Rates

College students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a harder time making it to graduation than their peers do, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that of 400 students they followed, those with ADHD had a lower grade-point average (GPA) -- about half a grade lower -- than students without the disorder. The gap emerged freshman year, and persisted throughout coll...

Stressed and Distracted, Kids and Their Teachers Say Virtual Learning Isn't Working

For Morgan Compton, 7, who has attended school remotely for nearly a year, the stress of the pandemic manifests itself in meltdowns.

On one particular day, Morgan "threw a fit and decided to go upstairs," said her mother, Tracy Compton. Hearing the sound of his daughter's tears, Compton's husband, John, who also works from home, got involved.

Meltdowns are familiar to any paren...

Education Level Now Prime Driver of COVID Vaccine Hesitancy: Poll

In the early weeks of the U.S. vaccine rollout, race looked like it would determine who was willing to get a shot in the arm, but education level now plays the most powerful role in that decision, new research shows.

More than three-quarters of adults with at least a bachelor's degree have been vaccinated or plan to be, compared to 53% of those without a college degree, according to a new...

Pandemic Is Adding to Teachers' Stress, and Quit Rates

Stress is the No. 1 reason U.S. teachers left the profession before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

Nearly 1,000 former public school teachers were polled in December. Three-quarters said their job was often or always stressful during their final year in the classroom.

Stress was nearly twice as common as poor pay as a reason for quitting, according to the resu...

Teachers Main Drivers of School COVID Outbreaks, So Vaccinations Needed: Study

In the wake of U.S. recommendations to re-open schools, a new government report indicates that teachers may be key spreaders of COVID-19 in schools and should be vaccinated against the coronavirus.

Researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that educators were responsible for recent clusters of COVID-19 in suburban Atlanta schools. Teacher vaccination should th...

Meeting the Challenges of Type 1 Diabetes in the Teen Years

Diabetes is never an easy disease to manage, but coping with type 1 diabetes can be a particularly difficult challenge for teens.

The transition from childhood to adolescence can be hard on both kids and parents, the JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) says.

As boys and girls with type 1 diabetes enter puberty they undergo lots of changes, including increases i...

Lockdowns Are Leaving Kids With ADHD in Crisis

When clinical psychologist Maggie Sibley thinks about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, she worries most about the older teens who may drop out of high school and those kids who may be experiencing depression.

It would be hard to argue that this year hasn't been difficult for everyone, and that may be even mor...

U.S. Schools Can Reopen, With Safeguards in Place: CDC

It may be safe for many of America's kids to head back to classrooms, experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced on Friday.

According to the agency's new operational guidance, schools can safely reopen if they employ five key "layered mitigation" strategies based on the level of COVID-19 transmission in their communities. Those strategies include steps such ...

There's 'A Path Forward' to Reopening Schools, CDC Officials Say

With most in-person classes curtailed or canceled in schools across the United States since last spring, kids and their parents have had a really tough year.

However, new studies suggest a return to in-person classes could be warranted, according to officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Writing in the Jan. 26 issue of the Journal of the American ...

Health Care After COVID: Racial Disparities Laid Bare

Deidre Johnson spends her days leading a center that provides resources to help Black people in her community overcome health disparities and other societal challenges.

She understands the impact this can have. As a mother of two and a Black woman, Johnson faced discrimination in the hospital when her sons were born and she experienced postpartum preeclampsia, a serious medical condi...

3 Steps Could Nearly Eliminate COVID Infections on College Campuses: Study

A combination of mask use, social distancing and routine testing would eliminate nearly all COVID-19 infections on U.S. college campuses, a new study claims.

Using a computer model that simulated a semester of a mid-sized college (5,000 students and 1,000 faculty), researchers assessed the effectiveness and cost of 24 combinations of four common preventive strategies: social distancing; m...

Pediatricians' Group Says School Is Priority, With Proper Safety Measures

A prominent U.S. doctors' group reaffirmed its recommendation this week that having kids physically in school should be the goal, while also outlining safety protocols needed to allow schools to be open.

In its COVID-19 guidance for safe schools, the American Academy of Pediatrics listed measures communities need to address. These include controlling the spread of COVID-19 in the communit...

Parents Feel the Strain as Pandemic Adds New Role: Teacher

New York City mom and author Lyss Stern spends most of her weekdays trying to help her three children learn remotely, and things are not going smoothly for any of them.

"There are a lot of moving parts, and I feel like I am constantly being an octopus," she said. "Are they learning enough? Are they challenged? Are missed assignments piling up? Are they looking at TikTok on their phone und...

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