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Results for search "Education".

25 Sep

Playtime with Dad Helps Boost Kids’ Grades Significantly, New Study Finds

Fathers who regularly read, play and draw with their young children give them an educational advantage, according to new research.

Health News Results - 240

GED Recipients Have Worse Health Than High School Graduates: Study

Adults who received a high school equivalency diploma have significantly poorer health outcomes than traditional graduates, according to a new study.

Older Americans with a General Education Development (GED) certificate had a higher risk for mental, hearing and vision impairments, limitations in activities of daily living and mobility issues, University of Toronto researchers found.

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Fatal ODs Are Hitting Less-Educated Americans the Hardest

Americans who haven't been to college appear to be a risk group for drug overdose deaths.

Deaths due to overdose increased among less-educated Americans, with the rate nearly doubling in a three-year period for those without a high school diploma, according to a new study by the RAND Corporation, a nonprofit research organization.

While it's not new that less-educated Americans repr...

Playtime With Dad Brings Kids Better Grades at School

Most parents want to help their kids do well in school, and for dads the answer may be found in something simple and fun.

A new study from the United Kingdom finds that kids do better in elementary school when their fathers regularly spend time interacting with them through reading, playing, telling stories, drawing or singing.

Researchers at Leeds University Business School found t...

Kids' ER Visits for Mental Health Crises Rise When School Term Begins

While the start of the school year can give kids and teens the chance to reconnect with friends and enjoy school sports and activities, it can also trigger stressors that send many to the emergency room for mental health woes, a new report shows.

Among children aged 5 to 17, emergency department visits for depression, suicidal thoughts, stress and substance abuse increased significantly i...

For Preemie Babies, Preschool Plus Parenting Can Spell Academic Success

Infants born three to six weeks early -- considered late preterm -- are at risk for learning problems, but they can be overcome, researchers say.

Preschool attendance and sensitive parenting can help them bridge the gap academically, a new study shows.

"Our findings highlight an opportunity for pediatric providers to offer prevention strategies to parents of late preterm infants to...

Adult Education Classes Could Be a Buffer Against Alzheimer's

Older people who take adult education classes may lower their risk for dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, Japanese research suggests.

Middle-aged folks and older people in adult education classes had a 19% lower risk of developing dementia within five years, the researchers found.

"We also found that nonverbal reasoning performance was well preserved in the adults taking educa...

Is Your Child Lagging in Reading Skills? An Expert Offers Tips

Helping a child who struggles with reading can be a rewarding experience.

A nationally known expert offers some tips for parents who are trying to help their child work through these difficulties.

Patricia Edwards, professor of language and literacy at Michigan State University's College of Education, s...

Help Kids Hit 'Reset' on Sleep as They Head Back to School

Keeping to a consistent bedtime routine is the key to helping your kids get restful and refreshing sleep.

Fortunately, about 81% of parents with kids under 18 surveyed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) say that's happening in their house.

The AASM offers some sleep tips to start the school year off right.

“Setting a consistent bedtime routine is very important...

Back-to-School Tips on Preventing Asthma, Allergy Flares in Kids

Heading back to school requires supplies and planning for all, but if you're a parent of a child with allergies or asthma then you have even more to consider.

“The start of a new school year is exciting for some, but for parents of children with allergies and asthma, their thoughts are probably on keeping their child free from triggers that can cause allergic reactions,” said allergis...

Some Schools Respond to Child Obesity by Focusing on Water

In the midst of a childhood obesity epidemic, a new study is pointing to a way to help school kids maintain a healthier weight: clean, accessible drinking water.

The decidedly low-tech solution emerged in a study of 18 California elementary schools that serve largely low-income minority families. Researchers found that when they kicked off a "Water First" program -- which included putting...

As Kids Head Back to School, New Survey Finds 71% Faced Challenges Last Year

As kids prepare to return to school, a new poll warns that the many children who found the last school year challenging are likely to be apprehensive this time around.

The online survey, conducted by the Harris Poll on behalf of the nonprofit On Our Sleeves Movement for Children's Mental Health, found that 71% of American parents say their children experienced challenges last school year....

EPA Awards $58 Million to Help Schools, Daycare Centers Remove Lead From Drinking Water

The Biden administration on Monday awarded $58 million in grants to help schools and daycare centers remove lead from drinking water.

The announcement came during an event in Boston.

“I am excited to join local leaders in Boston to announce $58 million in grant funding that can be used to test for lead in drinking water, identify potential sources, and remove those so...

Concussions Won't Lower Your Kid's IQ: Study

If your child has ever taken a knock to the head on the playing field, a new study has some reassuring news: There's no evidence that a concussion shaves points from a kid's IQ.

Researchers found that compared with children and teens who'd suffered broken bones or sprained ankles, those with a recent concussion did just as well on IQ tests up to three months after the head injury.

T...

Board Games Could Be a Win for Your Kid's Math Skills

Family game night can be more than just a fun time: New research suggests it may even help build some early math skills in young children.

While past research has pointed to games as a way to enhance reading development and literacy, a new comprehensive review finds that number games like Monopoly, Othello, and Chutes and Ladders may help children with math.

“Board games enhance ...

Loving, Supportive Daycare Tied to Better Grades Years Later

Could high-quality child care for young children translate into better grades in math and science?

Yes, says new research that found children with caregivers who provided both warmth and mental stimulation go on to do better in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in high school.

“Our results suggest that caregiving quality in early childhood can build a strong foundat...

Longer Breastfeeding in Infancy, Better School Grades for Kids?

Could breastfeeding lay the groundwork for good grades in high school?

That's what the findings of a new British study suggest, although the differences were small between those who were breastfed and those who weren't when it came to standardized test scores and grades.

"Breastfeeding promotes the development of the brain, which may account for better school performance," said lead...

Early College Class Times Can Hurt Students' Grades

Early morning college classes can be a prescription for poor attendance and lower grades, a new study suggests.

But starting classes later boosted both, as students got more sleep, were more likely to attend and were less likely to be groggy, which leads to better grades, researchers reported.

"Early morning classes likely impair learning due to effects on presenteeism -- being...

Florida Bill Would Ban Elementary School Kids From Learning About Menstruation

A proposed bill in Florida would prevent children from learning about menstruation in elementary school, even though some girls get their first periods in those years.

The bill would also ban other sex education topics through the fifth grade.

Sponsored by Republican Florida state Rep. Stan McClain, the bill advanced out of the House Education Quality Subcommittee last week, CBS...

Less Sleep Brings Worse Grades for College Kids, Study Finds

Late-night cramming, hall parties and other nocturnal activities can rob college kids of sleep, taking a big toll on grade point averages.

Freshmen who racked up fewer than 6 hours of sleep a night saw a drop in their end-of-term GPA, new research showed. For every hour of nightly slee...

Healthier School Meals Program Led to Less Overweight Kids: Study

More than a decade ago, the Obama administration passed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 as a way to counter the toll the obesity epidemic was taking on children's health.

The goal was to markedly improve the nutritional value of federal food programs that regularly put free and/or low-cost breakfasts, lunches and snacks on the plates of nearly 30 million American students.

Poorer Schools Could Bring Higher Dementia Rates Many Decades Later

What do race and early education have to do with dementia risk among seniors?

Quite a bit, a new study suggests.

Researchers spent decades tracking the onset of dementia among nearly 21,000 U.S. seniors, before reaching two main conclusions.

The firs...

USDA Proposes New Rules to Cut Sugar, Salt in School Meals

American schoolchildren could be getting school lunches that have less sugar and salt in the future, thanks to new nutrition standards announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday.

These are the first school lunch program updates since 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What's diffe...

Elementary School Kids Get Healthier When Gardening Is on Curriculum

A Texas-based education initiative has found that enrolling children in poor communities in gardening and cooking classes may help boost their long-term health.

Called “Texas Sprouts," the program covered one full academic year and exposed elementary school children in 16 low-income schools access to outdoor gardening instruction, nutrition information and cooking lessons. Parents were ...

America Facing Shortage of Infectious Disease Doctors

The COVID-19 pandemic. Dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The current waves of influenza and RSV ripping through schools and workplaces.

America has had ample examples in recent years of the importance of infectious disease doctors.

Despite this, the United States is facing a shortage of doctors choosing to specialize in infectious disease, according to the Infectious Diseases...

Final Exams Don't Have to Be High Stress for Your Teen

Final exams are stressful for students, but it is possible to ratchet down the pressure with some planning and self-compassion.

A psychologist from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston offers a few suggestions for helping teens manage the pressure.

Start with the basics, including making sure the teen is getting sufficient sleep, eating nutritiously without skipping meals and main...

Type 1 Diabetes Doesn't Have to Hold Kids Back in School

Children with type 1 diabetes miss more school than their peers without this condition, but the good news is these absences don't have to affect their grades or chances of going on to college, new research shows.

Kids who had the tightest control of their diabetes missed seven sessions a year, while those who had challenges managing their blood sugar levels were absent for 15 session...

Brain Imaging Shows How Young Kids Learn Quicker Than Grownups

Ever wonder why kids seem to pick up new knowledge and skills faster than adults?

A new study attributes the kids' mental prowess to differences in a brain messenger called GABA.

"Our results show that children of elementary school age can learn more items within a given period of time than adults, making learning more efficient in children," said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 17, 2022
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  • Even in Kindergarten, White Kids More Likely to Join Extracurricular Activities

    Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.

    Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities.

    The study found similar results for other after-school...

    Liability Fears Keep Some Schools From Stocking Asthma Inhalers

    It's a potentially deadly issue: Some U.S. school administrators don't keep life-saving albuterol asthma inhalers on hand because they're afraid of getting sued for misuse. That's true even in states like Illinois, where strong "stock albuterol" laws are on the books, researchers say.

    Kids with asthma don't always carry their inhalers, and some may not even know they have asthma until the...

    Early Elementary School Start Times May Not Harm Kids' Grades

    While later school start times can benefit middle and high school students, elementary school kids do just fine with an earlier wake-up call, according to new research.

    An earlier bell in elementary school may mean less sleep, but it doesn't affect learning for those children, according to research in a pair of studies published Oct. 13 in the journal Educational Evaluation and Policy...

    Concussion Aftermath Could Drag Down Teens' Grades

    Efforts to prevent concussions from happening at school or school-related sports activities may help keep teens from lagging behind on their academics.

    In a new study, researchers at the University of Washington found that those who had a recent

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 14, 2022
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  • The Most Common Form of Bullying Isn't Physical or Verbal

    The most widespread form of bullying isn't physical acts like pushing or kicking, nor is it verbal threats or derogatory remarks. Far and away bullies' top tactic is social exclusion.

    Also known as "relational aggression," this involves shutting out peers from group activities and spreading false rumors about them. And research underscores the damage done by this behavior.

    “When a...

    Kids Born Premature Lag in Elementary School, But Most Catch Up Later

    While babies born prematurely may lag behind their elementary school peers, they eventually catch up, British researchers report.

    By the end of high school, only the kids born before 32 weeks of gestation were continuing to struggle, according to a new study published online Aug. 17 in the journal

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 18, 2022
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  • The More Words Your Preschooler Knows, the Better They Do in Class

    Kids who enter preschool with good vocabulary and attention skills have a head start on academic success.

    That's the takeaway from a new study of nearly 900 4-year-olds and their ability to engage with teachers and peers, as well as their involvement in classroom tasks.

    “The levels of ...

    If a Child's Grades Falter, Consider Hearing Loss

    While some may think of hearing loss as something that happens with age, it can also happen to kids.

    Parents and teachers should consider hearing loss if a child's academic performance declines or he or she develops behavioral issues, lack of focus and depression, the American Academy of Audiology advises.

    “Because children often don't realize they are missing information and may ...

    One Back-to-School Worry for Parents: Traffic Dangers

    The dangers of school traffic is a major worry for many parents, a new poll finds.

    In fact, a third of more than 900 parents surveyed last spring said speeding and distracted parent drivers are their main concern, and drivers who don't follow the rules should be banned from school parking areas.

    According to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health from ...

    E 8/11 3PM -- CDC Eases COVID Social Distancing Guidance

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday it has loosened its COVID-19 social distancing recommendations as the American public learns to live with the virus in its midst.

    “We're in a stronger place today as a nation, with more tools — like vaccination, boosters, and treatments — to protect ourselves, and our communities, from severe illness from COVID-19,”...

    B 8/11 -- Pandemic Showed Teachers' Key Role in Spotting Child Abuse

    Teachers play a critical role in the early detection and reporting of child abuse, according to a new study that found school closures during the height of the pandemic may have meant that up to 8,000 reports of endangered children were missed.

    "Child maltreatment is a vex...

    CDC Set to Ease COVID Guidance, Including for Schools

    Americans could see an easing of COVID-19 social distancing recommendations as soon as this week.

    Updated guidance expected from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would change current recomm...

    Minority Students More Likely to Leave Medical School: Study

    Medical schools are doing a better job of recruiting minority students, but they still struggle to keep those would-be doctors on...

    Long, Regular Sleep Key to Kindergarten Success

    Long, restful and - most importantly - regular sleep is key to helping kindergarteners adjust to school, and a new study urges parents to start forming good sleep habits a full year ahead of time.

    Researchers found that kids who regularly got 10 hours of sleep or more b...

    Study Spots Key Factor in Kids' Friendships

    While kids in a classroom are likely to be familiar with all their classmates after a short time, the children they are assigned to sit near are likely to become their closer friends, a new study suggests.

    Researchers from Florida Atlantic University found that after seat assignments changed, students were more likely to become friends with newly near-seated classmates, than with those w...

    Why Getting Along in Preschool Is So Important

    The expression "plays well with others" is often tossed around to describe people who are less likely to ruffle feathers, and new research shows these sandbox skills really matter.

    It turns out that kids who play well with others in preschool are less likely to experience mental health issues ...

    The 3 Midlife Factors That Raise Your Odds for Alzheimer's

    Certain lifestyle factors can sway the risk of dementia, and a new study points to the top threats to Americans these days: obesity, physical inactivity and lack of a high school diploma.

    Researchers found that in just the past decade, there has been a shift in the most important modifiable risk factors for dementia in the United States. In 2011, the big three were physical inactivity, de...

    Bans on Affirmative Action Led to Fewer Black, Hispanic Doctors

    State bans on affirmative action have prompted a precipitous decline in the number of U.S. medical students from racial/ethnic minority groups, a new study finds.

    "We know that a more diverse physician workforce leads to better care for racial- and ethnic-minority patients," said lead researcher Dr. Dan Ly, a...

    Race, Income Can Be Roadblocks to Recovery From Depression

    If you're battling depression, the success of your treatment might be affected by your race, income, job status and education, a new study says.

    "If you're going home to a wealthy neighborhood with highly educated parents or spouse, then you're arguably in a much better environment for the treatment to be effective than if you're going to a poor neighborhood with other problems," said stu...

    Virtual Learning Didn't Slow Preschoolers' Reading Skills

    Preschoolers can learn reading skills in a virtual classroom, University of Washington researchers say.

    "Children are ready to learn to read at the age of 5. But the pandemic robbed children of the opportunity for in-person reading instruction," said Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS), in Seattle. "What we've shown here is that an online rea...

    School Segregation Tied to Problem Drinking Among Black Youth

    School segregation may sound like a relic from the past, but it has actually been increasing in the United States for years. Now a new study shows that has come with health consequences for Black children.

    Researchers found that in school districts with greater segregation, Black students tended to have more behavioral issues and were more likely to drink alcohol, versus their peers in mo...

    U.S. Medical Schools' Faculty Still Lack Diversity: Study

    U.S. medical schools are not keeping pace with a nation that is more racially and ethnically diverse every day, a new study reports.

    The schools' clinical faculty and leadership are not as diverse as the communities around them, though ...

    Parents' Expectations Driving College Kids to Dangerous Perfectionism: Study

    Kids today feel more pressured by their parents' high expectations, and that may be feeding a rise in perfectionism, a new study suggests.

    Some people claim the title "perfectionist" ...

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