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Yes, Kids Ward Off COVID More Easily. But Their Immune System Pays a Price

Children’s amped-up immune systems allow them to beat back COVID-19 easily, producing a strong initial response that quickly slaps away the virus.

But there might be a price to be paid for that sharp reaction, a new study from Australia says.

Because the init...

Childhood Autism Diagnosis Is Getting Better, But Not for Everyone

Autism cases are surging in the New York-New Jersey metro area, mainly fueled by the diagnosis of autistic children who don’t have intellectual disabilities, a new study reports.

The percentage of kids identified with autism spectrum disorder rose from about 1% in 2000 to 3% in 2016 in that region, said lead researcher

Is Rest Really Best After a Child Has a Concussion?

When kids suffer a concussion, an extended period of rest at home is always the best course, right? Perhaps not.

In fact, a new study suggests that -- despite what many people may presume -- getting kids back to school quickly is the best way to boost ...

Kids' COVID More Dangerous When Co-Infected With RSV, Colds

As colds, flu and COVID continue to circulate this winter, a new U.S. government study finds that young children infected with COVID plus a second virus tend to become sicker.

While severe COVID is rare among children, kids can and do fall ill enough to end up in the hospital.

During the pandemic's first two years, young U.S. children who were hospitalized with COVID tended to be mo...

When States Legalize Marijuana, Teens' Asthma Rates Rise

Cannabis use in U.S. states where recreational use is legal could be contributing to children's asthma, according to new research.

A study found increases in asthma in teens where cannabis is legal, compared to states where it remains banned for medicinal and recreational use. The study a...

Too Few Kids Are Getting Recommended Vaccines, CDC Warns

Vaccinations among kindergarteners declined for the second year in a row, leaving hundreds of thousands of young children vulnerable to dangerous infectious diseases, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

About 93% of kindergarteners had their required vaccinations during the 2021-2022 school year, including the measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis, polio and chick...

Leading Pediatricians' Group Calls for More Aggressive Treatment of Childhood Obesity

A leading pediatricians' group has issued new guidelines on treating obesity in children and teens that, for the first time, call for early, aggressive intervention that can include weight-loss drugs and surgery.

“There is no evidence that ‘watchful waiting’ or delayed treatment is appropriate for children with obesity,” Dr.

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 9, 2023
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  • New Hope Against 'Incurable' Liver Disease That Kills Children

    Patients with an incurable, genetic liver disease have new hope after an animal study showed that a single drug could reverse its effects.

    Alagille syndrome is caused by a mutation that prevents the formation and regeneration of bile ducts in the liver.

    About 4,000 babies a year are born with this condition. Often, they require a liver transplant, which is not always available. With...

    Look Out for the Early Signs of Autism

    When children have autism, it's possible to recognize the symptoms as early as when they are 18 months old.

    Although it takes a doctor to diagnose the condition, parents and caregivers should be aware of the signs, advises the Autism Research Institute, offering some other tips for noticing early symptoms.

    Children with autism may have variety of social, communication and behaviora...

    Measles Outbreak in Ohio Infects 82 Kids, Most of Them Unvaccinated

    A measles outbreak in central Ohio has now infected at least 82 children.

    Most of those impacted by the outbreak have been under the age of 5, state officials reported. Since details of the first measles cases were announced last month by Columbus Public H...

    Can Too Much Screen Time Raise a Child's Odds for OCD?

    Preteens who spend much of their free time watching online videos or playing video games may have a heightened risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among 9,200 9- and 10-year-olds they assessed, the odds of developing OCD inched up ...

    Gene Therapy Breakthrough Helps Children Born Without Immune System

    Ten children with an especially rare and hard-to-treat form of "bubble boy" disease are living normal lives after receiving a new gene therapy approach, researchers say.

    Experts said the findings are a major advance for children with the disease -- a subtype of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

    SCID refers to a group of rare genetic diseases that cause babies to be born ...

    Holiday Toys: Fun, But Remember Safety, Too

    Keeping an eye on safety will let the joy from holiday toys last longer, without a trip to the emergency room, experts say.

    Last year, more than 200,000 people were treated in emergency departments for toy-related injuries, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

    Dr. R...

    Homicide a Leading Cause of Death for Kids, Teens

    Homicide has become a leading killer of children, with guns being the most common weapon used in their deaths, a new study shows.

    The overall rate of homicides in children has grown about 4.3% each year for a decade, with a steep rise seen between 2019 and 2020, when the number of kids who died by homicide rose 27.7%.

    Firearm-related homicides rose 47.7% between 2019 and 2020, acc...

    Using Devices as Babysitters Can Backfire on Parents

    It's an all-too-familiar scenario for many parents: Your preschooler starts to act up just as the phone rings or you start dinner.

    Maybe you hand over an iPad or smartphone to soothe the child so you can get down to business.

    And this probably does the trick. But if this is your go-to strategy, your child may be at risk for developing longer-term behavioral issues — especially boy...

    Pfizer Asks FDA to Approve Tweaked COVID Booster as Third Shot for Kids Under 5

    Infants and young children could soon receive an updated COVID-19 vaccine as part of their three-dose series.

    Pfizer Inc. on Monday asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to have the vaccine that targets the Omicron subvariants BA.4 and BA.5 replace the third dose in the series for children aged 6 months through 4 years old. Children in that age group would still receive two doses o...

    Your Child Is Sick. Do You Call Your Doctor or Head to the ER?

    It's a common dilemma when your child seems sick: Do you call the doctor, make a trip to urgent care or head straight to the emergency room?

    If it's not an emergency, a call to your child's pediatrician may help guide you. The doctor's staff may recommend bringing your child in for a visit or going to urgent care -- particularly after hours when the pediatrician's office isn't open.

    <...

    Food Allergies & Thanksgiving Dinner Can Mix, Just Follow These Tips

    When loved ones come together for your Thanksgiving feast, keep in mind your those who have food allergies.

    Practice safety in menu planning, food preparation and even serving, urged Courtney Cary, a senior dietitian at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Be aware of the eight...

    Even in Kindergarten, White Kids More Likely to Join Extracurricular Activities

    Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.

    Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities.

    The study found similar results for other after-school...

    Parent's Mental Health Can Affect Kids' Asthma Care

    When a parent is depressed, their child's asthma care may suffer. Now, research suggests that getting a child's asthma under control may include assessing a parents' mental health.

    Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern found that treating a parent's depression could sometimes improve symptom control in asthmatic children.

    About 8% of American children have asthma. Sympto...

    Pediatricians Offer Tips on a Spooky But Safe Halloween

    By the time they're in elementary school, kids typically know their favorite parts about celebrating Halloween.

    But the holiday is still new to babies and toddlers, and some little ones may find it all too much.

    That's OK, said pediatrician Dr. Dina DiMaggio, a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She offered some tips for getting started with babies and toddlers who might ...

    Toddlers Nap a Lot - and Then They Don't. New Research Uncovers Why

    Why do some preschoolers refuse naps while others have a meltdown without an afternoon snooze? Researchers suspect it may have a lot to do with a specific memory-related part of the brain.

    While young children all need a lot of sleep, they do vary widely in when they stop napping during the day: Some leave naps behind by the time they are 3, while many others happily take an afternoon nap...

    Video Games May Bring Cognitive Benefits to Kids: Study

    School-age kids who spend hours a day playing video games may outperform their peers on certain tests of mental agility, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with children who never played video games, those who regularly spent hours gaming had higher scores on two standard cognitive tests: one measuring short-term memory and another gauging impulse control.

    Experts...

    U.S. Child Hunger Spiked in Weeks After Child Tax Credits Repealed

    Child tax credits had a huge impact in U.S. households that struggle to afford food.

    And after those credits ended, many...

    Child Danger: Almost Half of Parents Have Leftover Meds at Home

    Getting into prescription or over-the-counter medicines at home is a major source of accidental poisoning for young children.

    Yet, nearly half of parents say they have leftover prescriptions at home, a new poll shows.

    "We found that it's common for parents to keep m...

    Sleep-Deprived Kids Will Snack More: Study

    Experts studying kids' sleep and eating habits have learned more about a potential reason for childhood obesity.

    Kids who are deprived of sleep tend to eat more calories the next day, researchers found. And some of those extra calories come from less-healthy, sugar-laden snacks or treats.

    "When children lost sleep, overall they ate an extra 74 calories per day, caused by an increase...

    Early Elementary School Start Times May Not Harm Kids' Grades

    While later school start times can benefit middle and high school students, elementary school kids do just fine with an earlier wake-up call, according to new research.

    An earlier bell in elementary school may mean less sleep, but it doesn't affect learning for those children, according to research in a pair of studies published Oct. 13 in the journal Educational Evaluation and Policy...

    FDA Approves New Bivalent COVID Booster for Use in Children

    The new bivalent COVID-19 booster is now approved for children as young as 5 years old, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

    The bivalent booster shot includes one part that protects against the original strain of the COVID-19 coronavirus, and another part that targets the hi...

    Screen Kids 8 and Older for Anxiety, Expert Panel Recommends

    Children aged 8 and up should be screened for anxiety, the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended on Tuesday. Kids aged 12 and up should also be screened for

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 12, 2022
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  • Severe Food Allergies Can Traumatize Kids, But New Program Helps Ease Fears

    For a young child with life-threatening food allergies "the world looks like a minefield," a New Jersey mother says.

    It's a stress-filled landscape that financial adviser Amy Leis knows all too well. Her daughter Zoe was just a few months old when she suffered her first serious reaction to food, a potentially deadly event known as

    COVID Infection Raises a Child's Odds for Type 1 Diabetes by 72%

    Children who fall ill with COVID-19 may have a slightly increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that of more than 285,000 children with COVID, 0.04% were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over the next six months. While that's a small percentage, it was 72% higher than the rate in a comparison group of kids with no history of COVID.

    Experts...

    Pediatricians Offer Latest Advice on Controlling Head Lice in Kids

    Head lice are ubiquitous still, so there's a good chance your son or daughter could develop an infestation. Now, the nation's leading pediatrics group is issuing new guidelines to help schools and families cope.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is emphasizing education to reduce stigma and manage infestations. The new guidelines are the first on diagnosing and treating

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 27, 2022
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  • Pfizer, Moderna Seek Approval of New COVID Boosters for Kids

    Both Pfizer and Moderna have asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to approve their updated coronavirus boosters for children.

    The "bivalent" shots, like those that adults were able to start receiving this month, t...

    Too Few Kids With Sickle Cell Anemia Get Screened for Stroke Risk

    Too few children with sickle cell anemia are getting the recommended screening tests for stroke, a common complication of this disease, a new government report finds.

    What's more, many aren't receiving

  • By Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 21, 2022
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  • 'Life Changing': New Drug Eases Severe Eczema in Young Kids

    Sonia Dhaliwal knows exactly how bad childhood eczema can get.

    That's because her young daughter, Ariah Khan, has struggled with a severe case of the skin condition ever since she was a baby.

    Ariah's symptoms were relentless and debilitating until the age of 3. They included rashes; skin discoloration...

    Kids With Bell's Palsy Typically Recover Without Treatment

    While adults typically need steroid medication to treat Bell's palsy, most children can recover without treatment, a new study finds.

    Bell's palsy temporarily causes weakness and paraly...

    Pediatricians Urge Parents to Get Kids a Flu Shot

    Children should get their flu shot as soon as it is available, preferably by the end of October, a leading medical group recommends.

    Flu vaccination lagged last year, with 55% of children getting their vaccines, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) noted. Coverage levels were 8 percentage points lower for Black childre...

    One Factor Is Key to Healthy Eating for Kids With Down Syndrome

    When it comes to food, kids with Down syndrome have definite likes and dislikes -- and a food's texture is crucial.

    Food with a crispy, oily mouthfeel generally get a big thumbs-up, while brittle or gooey foods get a thumbs-down.

    But picky food choices can result in a less healthful diet, so researchers wanted to better understand how

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 31, 2022
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  • The Most Common Form of Bullying Isn't Physical or Verbal

    The most widespread form of bullying isn't physical acts like pushing or kicking, nor is it verbal threats or derogatory remarks. Far and away bullies' top tactic is social exclusion.

    Also known as "relational aggression," this involves shutting out peers from group activities and spreading false rumors about them. And research underscores the damage done by this behavior.

    “When a...

    Breakfast Might Be Good for a Child's Emotional Health, Too

    What your kids eat for breakfast and where they eat it could matter for their social and emotional health.

    That's the upshot of a new nationwide study from Spain that concluded that eating breakfast away from home was almost as detrimental as skipping the meal altogether. Researchers said thi...

    Tasty, Nutritious School Lunches for Your Budget

    School lunches can be nutritious, help kids maintain their energy throughout the day and fit into a budget.

    One nutrition expert offers some tips for cost-effective healthy lunch options.

    "All foods belong in our diet, but we need to view them as energy," said Courtn...

    Tips to Food-Fueling Your Active Vegan Child

    Kids can take part in sports while on vegetarian and vegan diets, but parents and caregivers must help them select foods that will fuel them and meet their nutrition needs.

    Vegan athletes can become deficient in vitamin B12, vitamin D, long-chain omega-3 fats, riboflavin and calcium, so it's important to find good substitutes, said Roberta Anding, a registered dietitian at Baylor College ...

    Organ From Live Donor Best When Child Needs New Kidney

    Children who need kidney transplants have better long-term outcomes when the donor is a living person and not someone who has died and donated organs, a new study finds.

    "The findings of our study should lay to rest any fears and concerns that centers have about accepting organs from unrelate...

    The More Words Your Preschooler Knows, the Better They Do in Class

    Kids who enter preschool with good vocabulary and attention skills have a head start on academic success.

    That's the takeaway from a new study of nearly 900 4-year-olds and their ability to engage with teachers and peers, as well as their involvement in classroom tasks.

    “The levels of ...

    Lead Poisoning Plus Systemic Racism Are Harming Black Kids' Test Scores

    It's well known that exposure to lead can harm young children's brain development. Now a new study suggests that racial segregation may be compounding the detrimental effects of lead on Black children.

    The study, of close to 26,000 schoolchildren, found that Black children with elevated blood lead levels had wo...

    If a Child's Grades Falter, Consider Hearing Loss

    While some may think of hearing loss as something that happens with age, it can also happen to kids.

    Parents and teachers should consider hearing loss if a child's academic performance declines or he or she develops behavioral issues, lack of focus and depression, the American Academy of Audiology advises.

    “Because children often don't realize they are missing information and may ...

    Global Warming Will Mean More Unfit, Unhealthy Kids Worldwide: Study

    Children are not as physically fit as their parents were when they were kids, and this will likely harm them as the Earth warms, new research claims.

    The findings are based on a comprehensive review of more than 150 studies that looked at how children maintain physical activity, exercise and cope with heat, as well as how thi...

    Getting Young Athletes Ready for a New School Year

    As a new school year begins, many students return to their favorite sports or try something new.

    Encouraging kids to make physical activity part of their lives has lifelong benefi...

    8/9 -- Pandemic Brought More Woes for Kids Prone to Headaches

    Add more frequent headaches in kids who are already vulnerable to them to the list of ills associated with the pandemic.

    Before the pandemic, 60% of kids reported headaches on less than 15 days of the month. After the start of the pandemic, this number fell to 50%. W...

    Too Little Sleep May Harm Young Kids' Brains

    For peak performance, school-age children need more than a healthy diet and exercise. They also need plenty of sleep.

    A new study finds that elementary school kids who get less than nine hours of sleep each night show significant differences in some brain regions responsible for memory, intelligence and well-being compared to those who get the advised nine to 12 hours' sleep.

    “We ...

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