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Results for search "Diseases &, Conditions: Misc.".

26 Sep

Study Suggests Long COVID Is a Unique Biological Disease Impacted by Your Medical History

Researchers say patients with long COVID have clear differences in their immune and hormone functions, which can be detected through blood tests with high accuracy.

29 Jun

New MS Discovery Could Lead to Treatments That Prevent Disease Progression, Study Finds

Scientists say they have identified the 1st genetic variant that increases the severity of multiple sclerosis. They say this discovery could one day lead to new treatments that prevent long-term disability.

Health News Results - 169

Americans Can Expect to Spend Half Their Lives Taking a Prescription Drug

Americans born in recent years can likely count on taking prescription drugs for about half their life, according to new research.

For males born in 2019, it's about 48% of their lives. For women, it's 60% of their lifetime, the study found.

“The years that people can expect to spend taking prescription drugs are now higher than they might spend in their first marriage, getti...

Rat-Borne Parasite That Can Cause Brain Disease Spreading in Southern U.S.

Brown rats found and analyzed near Atlanta now carry rat lungworm, researchers report.

It's a parasite that can trigger a dangerous brain encephalitis in both people and pets, and which now threatens a wide area of the U.S. Southeast.

Researchers in Georgia say the microscopic rat lungworm, known scientifically as Angiostrongylus cantonensis, typically begins its life cycle...

U.S. Livestock, Pet Industries Pose Disease Threat to People

American industry engages in some of the same high-risk practices as other countries in keeping and selling commercial animals that have the potential for triggering outbreaks of disease among humans, a new report shows.

Researchers from Harvard Law...

Sciatica: What Is It, and How Can You Ease the Pain?

If you have had a sharp pain shooting down one leg, you may be experiencing a condition called sciatica.

Here is what you need to know about sciatica, including what it is, its causes, symptoms and treatments. Plus, learn about medications, self-care and stretches that may provide relief.

What is sciatica?

  • Sue Benzuly, RN HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 26, 2023
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  • When Your Child Has Scoliosis: Symptoms & Treatments

    The future for a child diagnosed with scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine that typically occurs just before puberty, can feel uncertain.

    As a parent, you want answers to your questions about scoliosis and how it can affect your child's development. Here's what you need to know.

    What is scoliosis?

    Scoliosis is an abnormal sideways curvature of the spine. In some cases...

    Getting Rid of Neck Pain: 6 Ways to Feel Better

    The phrase "pain in the neck" is a tongue-in-cheek way to describe annoying situations or people that test our patience, but for those who experience genuine neck pain, it's no laughing matter.

    Neck pain can be a debilitating condition that affects daily life and leaves sufferers longing for relief. This article will explore some practical strategies to alleviate neck pain and provide sel...

    The Most Common Back Surgeries, Explained

    Imagine a life where even the simplest movement becomes a painful endeavor.

    Back pain, a pervasive ailment affecting millions, can turn daily routines into exhausting and painful challenges. Back surgery emerges as a potential solution when conventional treatments fall short, offering hope for those trapped in chronic pain.

    What are the most common back surgery types, and how do the...

    What Is Gastritis and How Is It Treated?

    You're feeling bloated, nauseous and in pain. What is wrong?

    It may be gastritis, an inflammation of the stomach lining that can come on suddenly or gradually. It can also lead to other problems, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Here, experts explore gastritis, its caus...

    Crohn's Disease: What Is It, and How Can It Be Treated?

    Crohn's disease can turn your life into a gastrointestinal nightmare, but there is hope.

    According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), more than half a million Americans have Crohn's diseas...

    What Is Celiac Disease?

    Celiac disease is a chronic disease that can't be cured, but treatment can help with symptoms.

    This guide will break down what you need to know about celiac disease, including its causes and symptoms, along with self-care and treatment. You'll also learn more about the celiac disease diet, especially foods to eat and those to avoid.

    What is celiac disease?

    Cel...

    What's Causing Your Indigestion — And How to Treat It

    Indigestion, or dyspepsia, is a common ailment that can bring about a range of uncomfortable symptoms, leaving one feeling full and experiencing stomach pain.

    It's a condition that affects many individuals and can significantly impact their quality of life. In this article, experts delve into the intricacies of indigestion, exploring its causes, symptoms and treatment options.

    Addit...

    Loss of Bees Could Harm Health of Millions of People

    Bees, in their role as master pollinators, increase crop yields, leading to more production of healthy fruits, vegetables and nuts.

    But new research claims that the challenges these important insects face from changes in land use, harmful pesticides and climate change is affecting food production, leading to less healthy food in global diets and more diseases causing excess deaths.

    Climate Change Making 218 Infectious Diseases Even Worse

    Flooding, heat waves and drought have made 58% of infectious diseases worse, a new analysis claims.

    For the review of previous studies, published Aug. 8 in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers found that 218 of the known 375 infectious diseases have been made worse by climate change, including

    'Human Cell Atlas' Maps 1 Million Cell Types in 33 Organs

    An international research effort has unveiled the most extensive reference map yet of individual cells within the human body, knowledge that could revolutionize the study of health and disease.

    The massive Human Cell Atlas contains detailed maps of more than one million individual cells across 33 organs and systems, researchers announced this week.

    "You can think of it as a Google M...

    Nerve Gas Sarin Probably Caused Gulf War Syndrome

    After 30 years, researchers believe they finally have definitive evidence of the primary cause of Gulf War syndrome: exposure to low levels of the nerve gas sarin.

    Gulf War syndrome is blamed for leaving a quarter million veterans of the 1991 conflict with a disabling array of long-...

    City Rats May Not Pose Big Pandemic Threat

    Despite what you may have heard, rats and other city wildlife aren't likely to trigger future pandemics in people, according to a new study.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has scientists trying to determine where future outbreaks are most likely to start. It's long been suspected that critters in cities might act as reservoirs for viruses that could cause outbreaks in humans.

    An internationa...

    Did Your Gene Screen Turn Up Dangerous DNA? Study Finds Real Risk Is Low

    Most gene variants that have been labeled "pathogenic" may make only a small difference in a person's risk of actually developing disease, a new study suggests.

    Scouring genetic data on more than 72,000 individuals,

    Vitamin D Supplements Might Cut Your Odds for Autoimmune Diseases

    Taking vitamin D supplements may help stave off psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and other autoimmune diseases, a new study suggests.

    Previous research has hinted at this connection, but the new study is the first randomized controlled trial to look at what happens when people are given vitamin D supplements and followed to see if they develop an

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 27, 2022
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  • Scientists Discover How the 'Mono' Virus Might Trigger MS

    A one-two punch from science has clearly tagged the mononucleosis virus, Epstein-Barr, as a major cause of multiple sclerosis.

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) appears to trigger multiple sclerosis (MS) by tricking the immune systems of some into attacking their body's own nerve cells, a new study indicates.

    "...

    Many People With Asthma Have Mixed Feelings About Masks: Poll

    Although they report difficulty breathing and discomfort while wearing a face mask, most people with asthma still use them in public places during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds.

    University of Illinois Chicago researchers conducted an online survey of more than 500 adults with asthma. They found that 84% report...

    Crowded Emergency Rooms Cost Lives: Study

    A seemingly endless wait in an emergency department can be taxing for many reasons, but new research suggests that long delays in being admitted to the hospital may even raise a patient's risk of death within the following 30 days.

    Why? One possible reason: A crowded ER might mean care happens in suboptimal spaces, said study author Simon Jones, a research professor in the department of p...

    New MRI Technique Might Help Spot MS Sooner

    Researchers in Austria say a new MRI technique may lead to faster diagnosis and treatment for people with multiple sclerosis.

    The technique can detect biochemical changes in the brains of people with MS early in their disease, according to findings published Jan. 4 in the journal Radiology.

    "MRI o...

    A Better Way to Correct Severe Scoliosis in Kids?

    Young patients with early-onset scoliosis, a dangerous curvature of the spine, have two options for surgery, but a new study finds one of the procedures results in fewer complications.

    For 8- to 11-year-olds, growth-friendly surgery that allows the spine to continue growing might sound preferable, but researchers say it leads to far more operations and complications than

  • Cara Murez
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • When Gums Aren't Healthy, Mind and Body May Follow

    Gum disease isn't just a threat to your teeth. It also increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, mental woes and more, British researchers report.

    "The study reinforces the importance of prevention, early identification and treatment of periodontal disease, and the need for members of th...

    Highly Inbred, French Bulldogs Face Higher Odds for 20 Health Issues

    French Bulldogs are incredibly cute, sporting adorable snub snouts, big round heads, bright wide eyes and large bat ears.

    Unfortunately, the physical traits that make them one of the most popular breeds in the United States and United Kingdom also saddle them with a host of health problems, a new study shows.

    Frenchies have significantly higher odds than other dog breeds of being di...

    Medical Marijuana May Help Ease Severe Epilepsy in Kids: Study

    Kids with severe epilepsy may take multiple medications and follow special diets, yet still suffer seizures. Now a small study suggests medical marijuana may sometimes help when other therapies fail.

    British researchers found that medical pot slashed seizures by almost 90% and reduced use of traditional medications.

    But at least one outside expert cautions that it's way too early fo...

    Across the U.S., Black Americans Breathe in Dirtier Air

    Is air pollution a bigger health threat to minorities?

    Apparently so, claims a new U.S. study that finds while air pollution levels have fallen in recent decades, people of color still have more exposure to dirty air than white Americans do.

    Air pollution is linked to a range of heal...

    'Wellness' Vapes Are All the Rage, But FDA Says Buyer Beware

    “Fights off tumors and alleviates symptoms of chemotherapy," one vape's advertising claims, while another is touted as an "asthma remedy, ADHD remedy, and dementia treatment."

    Don't believe the hype.

    Despite claims that certain vaping products may alleviate health problems, there's no proof that they do -- and they may even cause health issues, the U.S. Food and Drug Administratio...

    Exercise May Be a Buffer Against Pneumonia

    Regular physical activity has all sorts of benefits, and now researchers say it may help ward off serious pneumonia.

    Until now, it wasn't clear how exercise affected the risk of pneumonia, an infection of the lung tissue usually caused by bacteria or viruses. To find out, researchers ana...

    Black Women Have Triple the Odds for Lymphedema After Breast Cancer Surgery

    A condition called lymphedema is a well-known side effect of breast cancer treatment that can lead to swelling in the arms and legs.

    New research suggests that Black women experience are at more than three times the risk of this painful issue compared to white women.

    "Lymphedema worsens quality of life for breast cancer patients," said the study's lead author, Dr. Andrea Barrio. S...

    Most Dog Breeds Are Highly Inbred -- and Unhealthy

    Traits particular to certain dog breeds -- the distinctive spots of a dalmatian or the stubby legs of a dachshund -- are often achieved through inbreeding.

    But most breeds are now highly inbred, increasing a dog's risk of health problems, a new study confirms.

    "It's amazing how inbreeding seems to matter to health," study leader Danika Bannasch said.

    Her genetic analysis of 2...

    'Active Grandparent': Humans Evolved to Exercise in Old Age

    Becoming a couch potato as you get older goes against evolution and puts your health at risk, a new study suggests.

    Humans have evolved to be active in their later years, and staying active can protect against heart disease and a number of other serious health problems, according to researchers at Harvard.

    "It's a widespread idea in Western societies that as we get older, it's norma...

    People With Diabetes Less Likely to Spot Dangerous A-Fib: Study

    If they have diabetes, people with atrial fibrillation (a-fib) are less likely to notice symptoms of the common heart rhythm disorder. They also tend to have a higher risk of serious complications, a new study finds.

    "It is remarkable to find that patients with diabetes had a reduced recognition of atrial fibrillation symptoms," said study co-author Dr. Tobias Reichlin, a professor of car...

    Two New Symptoms That Could Point to Pancreatic Cancer

    Researchers have identified two previously unrecognized symptoms of pancreatic cancer -- a discovery that might help with earlier detection and improve extremely low survival numbers, they say.

    "When pancreatic cancer is diagnosed earlier, patients have a higher chance of survival. It is possible to diagnose patients when they visit their GP, but both patients and GPs need to be aware of ...

    Almost 1 in 3 U.S. Seniors Now Sees at Least 5 Doctors Per Year

    Nearly one-third of older U.S. adults visit at least five different doctors each year -- reflecting the growing role of specialists in Americans' health care, a new study finds.

    Over the past 20 years, Americans on Medicare have been increasingly seeing specialists, researchers found, with almost no change in visits with their primary care doctor.

    On average, beneficiaries saw a 34%...

    Are Avid Exercisers at Higher Risk for ALS?

    A new study may allay concerns that strenuous exercise could up the risk for developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an incurable neurological disease.

    No evidence of rising ALS risk was seen among adults who routinely work up a sweat by playing team sports or engaging in heavy gym workouts. Nor was increased ALS risk associated with less intense leisure activities, such as runnin...

    Japanese Scientists Discover New Disease Carried by Ticks

    Scientists in Japan have discovered yet another tick-borne virus that can make people sick.

    The Yezo virus is transmitted by tick bites, and triggers fever and a reduction in blood platelets and white blood cells.

    "At least seven people have been infected with this new virus in Japan since 2014, but, so far, no deaths have been confirmed," said Keita Matsuno, a virologist at Hokkaid...

    Tree Rings Show Hurricanes Becoming Wetter, Longer, More Dangerous

    The rings of stately pines on the coasts of North and South Carolina offer telling long-term evidence of climate change and a chilling forecast for the future.

    The upshot: The last 300 years have gotten wetter and wetter, making hurricanes ever more dangerous.

    "Our findings suggest that the maximum amount of rainfall from these storms is increasing and is likely going to continue to...

    Peripheral Artery Disease: Common, and Here's How to Spot It

    If you're older and your legs ache, it could be nothing -- or it could be a sign of peripheral artery disease (PAD).

    Have you ever even heard of it? Maybe not. That's why the Society for Vascular Surgery would like you to know a little more.

    "As we age, we are susceptible to some aches and pains, possibly a tightness in the lower back after standing for long periods of time or a sor...

    Weight Loss Surgery More Dangerous for Men Than Women: Study

    Weight loss surgery is riskier for men than women, with males five times more likely to die within 30 days of the procedure, a new study finds.

    Moreover, men's odds of dying over the long run are almost three times higher, said researchers who looked at thousands of weight loss (bariatric) procedures in obese patients in Austria.

    The reason? Compared to women, men who opt for weight...

    Common Hormone Disorder in Women Costs U.S. $8 Billion a Year

    Treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) -- the most common hormone disorder in women of child-bearing age -- is costly.

    In 2020, diagnosing and treating this disorder cost an estimated $8 billion in the United States, according to a new economic ana...

    Trial Into Antioxidant for Parkinson's Disease Yields Disappointing Results

    FRIDAY, Sept. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers hoped to show that the natural antioxidant urate could delay Parkinson's disease progression, but a study completed at Massachusetts General Hospital dashed those expectations.

    The trial enrolled nearly 300 individuals recently diagnosed with early Parkinson's disease, which affects the body's motor system. Symptoms such as tremors,...

    Why Are More U.S. Babies Being Born With Syphilis?

    The number of U.S. infants born with syphilis is climbing at an alarming pace, reaching a high not seen since the 1990s, according to new government figures.

    Newborn syphilis, a potentially fatal condition, was at one time nearly eliminated in the United States. But the disease has seen a resurgence in recent years -- and 2020 was no exception, say researchers with the U.S. Centers for Di...

    Could COVID Be Eradicated Someday? Maybe, Experts Say

    Could COVID-19 one day go the way of smallpox and polio?

    New research suggests it might be possible to beat the coronavirus with high vaccination rates and rapid responses to immunity-evading variants, the study authors said.

    "While our analysis is a preliminary effort, with various subjective components, it does seem to put COVID-19 eradicability into the realms of being possi...

    Cats Might Be Purrfect Model for Human Genetics Research

    Dogs may be man's best friend, but cats may hold critical keys to humans' health.

    Our feline friends have the potential to become a valuable model for genetic research, because their genome is similar to that of people, according to Leslie Lyons of the Feline Genetics Laboratory at the University of Missouri in Columbia.

    "Using cats in research is really overlooked, since people don...

    Severe COVID for People Under 45: Who's Most at Risk?

    Young people aren't immune from severe COVID-19, and a new study warns that some are more at risk than others.

    Folks under 45 have more than triple the risk for severe COVID-19 if they have cancer or heart disease, or blood, neurologic or endocrine disorders, according to Mayo Clinic researchers.

    "One of the surprising findings was that almost every single chronic condition category...

    Long COVID May Qualify as a Disability: Biden

    Serious "long COVID" symptoms could qualify as a disability and make patients eligible for federal assistance, President Joe Biden said Monday.

    Some recovered COVID-19 patients have lasting problems such as fatigue, brain fog, joint pain, fever and double vision, which "can sometimes rise to the level of a disability," Biden said during a White House event marking the 31st anniversary of ...

    Fermented Foods Could Boost Your Microbiome

    Fermented foods may seem like just another health fad, but a small trial suggests they can help strike a healthier balance in the body's gut bacteria.

    In a study of 36 people, researchers found that those randomly assigned to eat plenty of fermented foods, such as yogurt, kimchi and kombucha, showed an increase in their gut "microbiome" diversity.

    The microbiome refers to the vast c...

    Certain Sickle Cell Disease Traits Can Raise Odds for Severe COVID

    People with sickle cell disease who have a history of severe pain episodes and coexisting organ conditions have an increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness, a new study suggests.

    "This study tells us that all individuals with sickle cell disease are not at equal levels of risk," said study author Dr. Lana Mucalo, of the Medical College of Wisconsin. "Patients with a history of pain, as ...

    COVID Falls From America's #1 Killer to #7 by June

    A steep rise in vaccination rates has dropped COVID-19 from the first to the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, a new analysis shows.

    The disease was the third leading cause of death for much of 2020, but became the leading cause of death in December 2020 and early 2021, reaching a peak of 3,136 deaths per day in January 2021 and far surpassing U.S. deaths from heart dis...

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